Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 2

A Few Words of Advice for Rudy
Byline: Allan Sloan Dear Rudy, Isn't the business world great? The money's terrific, you don't have to smile at all those annoying voters and you don't have a city council to deal with. Your firm, Giuliani Partners, has signed up big-bucks customers...
Read preview Overview
A Natural Way to Age: Worried about the Safety of Hormone-Replacement Therapy, Women Are Wondering How to Deal with Menopause
Byline: Claudia Kalb Enter any health-food store and you will be overwhelmed by an alphabet of products promising menopausal relief. Black cohosh. Chasteberry. Dong quai. Licorice. Red clover. Soy. And then there are the blends of herbs, the creams...
Read preview Overview
Anxiety and Depression: Natural Mood Remedies
Byline: Michael Craig Miller, M.D., Harvard Medical School It's a wonderful concept. Feeling blue or worried, you run to the market and choose a natural remedy off the shelf. No stigmatizing visit to a psychiatrist. Nothing in your medical record...
Read preview Overview
A Pageant Turns Ugly: The Miss World Contest Sparks Deadly Riots in Nigeria
Byline: Tom Masland To avoid controversy, Miss World pageant organizers scrubbed the swimsuit contest and ruled out a tour of Nigeria's Muslim north. But controversy found them--in the form of a newspaper column. "The Muslims thought it was immoral...
Read preview Overview
Beyond the Backache
Byline: Dan Cherkin, Ph.D., Karen Sherman, Ph.D., Group Health Cooperative, Seattle; David Eisenberg, M.D., Harvard Medical School Back pain is often as mystifying to doctors as it is to patients. Diagnostic tests rarely pinpoint the causes, and...
Read preview Overview
Big Brother Is Back: The Pentagon's Plan to Eyeball America's Databases Is Drawing Fire-As Is Its Controversial Salesman
Byline: John Barry The official logo of the information Awareness Office, the Pentagon's secretive new terrorist-detection experiment, isn't subtle. A picture of the globe, under the watchful gaze of that spooky pyramid on the dollar bill, the one...
Read preview Overview
Easing the Treatment
Byline: Wendy Weiger, M.D., Ph.D., and David Eisenberg, M.D., Harvard Medical School Cancer "cures" abound on the Internet. Unfortunately, few of them are backed by credible evidence. Choosing an untested alternative over an established treatment...
Read preview Overview
Fewer Friends in Need: With the Market Sagging and Lingering Doubts about Some Charities' Finances, Donations Are Dropping Sharply This Year
Byline: Daniel Mcginn Betsy Isroelit has much to be thankful for. The 59-year-old resident of Hollywood, Calif., runs her own marketing company and has a loving husband and four children. But as she sits down to Thanksgiving dinner this year, Isroelit...
Read preview Overview
For the Littlest Patients: Yoga, Massage, Herbs, Acupuncture, Hypnosis-You Name It, Someone Somewhere Is Trying It on Kids
Byline: David Noonan For 12-year-old cancer patient Christie Blackwood, the key to coping with chemotherapy was going back to "the place where they throw the fish." Christie was diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia in mid-September. Not unexpectedly,...
Read preview Overview
From the Editor
Byline: Mark Whitaker You probably don't think of Harvard Medical School as a place you'd go to study acupuncture, herbal remedies and massage. But if you visit Boston these days, that's what you'll find: a faculty rigorously investigating the field...
Read preview Overview
Holiday Gift Guide: Toys
Not sure what to get the picky tykes on your Christmas list? Behold, we bring you good tidings of great toys: 1. Tutu Garnet Hill Cotton-candy tulle frills with satin ribbons and roses. Good luck ever getting your kid to take it off; $48 at garnethill.com....
Read preview Overview
How to Lift the Mind: For Those Suffering from the Pain of Anxiety and Depression, Complementary Medicine Is No Miracle Cure. but Some Treatments Offer Real Hope
Byline: Claudia Kalb They are invisible--no bandages or scars--but the mental and physical pain of mood disorders can be unbearable. Anxiety overwhelms the mind with worry, fear and dread. Depression hijacks a person's sense of well-being, manifesting...
Read preview Overview
Learning from China: Researchers Are Finding That Traditional Chinese Medicine May Have a Lot to Offer
Byline: Anne Underwood "A western doctor would say you are perfectly healthy, but you are not!" proclaims Nan Lu, a doctor of traditional Chinese medicine in New York's Chinatown. Dr. Lu has just examined my tongue and taken my pulse--or rather...
Read preview Overview
Newsmakers
Byline: Marc Peyser A FINE ROMANCE So another "Bachelor" bites the dust, and now we can debate again whether this is the most disgusting, degrading show since, since--well, we can debate that, too. But say what you will, the second installment...
Read preview Overview
Now,'Integrative Care: As Science Rigorously Examines Herbs and Acupuncture, a New Blend of Medicine Emerges
Byline: Geoffrey Cowley Carol green was busy filling out medical-school applications several years ago when she had an epiphany. She could devote herself to a single healing tradition, she realized, or she could take a chance on something more inclusive....
Read preview Overview
Options for Arthritis Pain
Byline: Robert Shmerling, M.D., Harvard Medical School; Catherine Ulbricht, Pharm.D., and Ethan Basch, M.D., Harvard Health Publications More than 20 million Americans suffer from osteoarthritis. For most cases, conventional treatment involves exercise...
Read preview Overview
Pondering the Placebo Effect: Why Do Sham Treatments Work? and What Do They Tell Us about the Nature of Self-Healing?
Byline: drs. Ted Kaptchuk, David Eisenberg and Anthony Komaroff Whether you regard it as an annoyance or a miracle, you have to marvel at the power of suggestion. When doctors test a new medical treatment, they conclude that it works only when patients...
Read preview Overview
Research: Finding out What Works
Byline: Drs. Ted Kaptchuk, David Eisenberg and Anthony Komaroff, Harvard Medical School Consumers are not the only ones experimenting with complementary and alternative medicine these days. After shunning CAM for most of the past century, many conventionally...
Read preview Overview
Retail's Quick Hit: Kohl's Has Posted Spectacular Growth by Appealing to Time-Starved Soccer Moms
Byline: Peg Tyre Prowling a Kohl's in suburban New York last week, Renee Gold was looking for bargains and finding them easily. She stopped at a rack of men's fleece jackets marked down from $36 to $17. "You can't beat the sales,'' says Gold, who...
Read preview Overview
SKIING: Trying to Keep Cool
Byline: Paul Tolme After one of the worst winters in memory, ski-resort operators in the Rocky Mountains are elated about this year's early-season snowfall: despite advances in snowmaking technology, resorts still live or die with Mother Nature....
Read preview Overview
TERRORISM: Score One for the United States
Byline: MARK HOSENBALL United States intelligence believes top Qaeda field commander Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri was actively plotting terrorist attacks against American targets in the Persian Gulf and elsewhere--attacks that U.S. officials hope have...
Read preview Overview
The Economic Impact of War
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson It is Feb. 7, 2003, just after American troops have seized several Iraqi airfields to be used as staging areas. Suddenly, Scud missiles--armed with both chemical and conventional warheads--strike the airfields. Hundreds...
Read preview Overview
'The Hammer' Strikes: As 'King of the Hill,' House GOP Leader Tom DeLay Could Be Bush's Best Friend-Or His Worst Nightmare
Byline: Howard Fineman George W. Bush is calling Rep. Tom DeLay of Houston more often these days. When he does, he praises the power of DeLay's political machine, which this year featured a get-out-the-vote drive called STOMP that helped win crucial...
Read preview Overview
The Sand Trap of Inequality
Byline: Anna Quindlen That Tiger Woods: what a disappointment. Sure, the guy is one of the greatest athletes of our time. And unlike others who trade superhuman eye-hand coordination for big cash, he has never felt the need to pound his significant...
Read preview Overview
The Saudi Money Trail: Rent Payments for 9-11 Hijackers and Mysterious Checks from a Princess's Account. Is There a Saudi Tie to Terror? Inside the Probe the Bush Administration Doesn't Want You to Know About
Byline: Michael Isikoff And Evan Thomas When the two Qaeda operatives arrived at Los Angeles International Airport around New Year's 2000, they were warmly welcomed. Nawaf Alhazmi and Khalid Almihdhar would help hijack American Airlines Flight 77...
Read preview Overview
Time to Build a Fence? Some Israeli Pols Talk about Fencing off the Whole West Bank. but Amram Mitzna, the New Labor Party Leader, Is Serious
Byline: Dan Ephron Even in the wildly disparate arena of Israeli politics, Amram Mitzna stands out. As the Labor Party's new leader, the 57-year-old general has become the country's first candidate for prime minister ever to run on a promise to...
Read preview Overview
Ways to Heal Your Heart
Byline: William Haskell, Ph.D., Stanford University, and David Eisenberg, M.D., Harvard Medical School Most people know that a healthy lifestyle can help prevent heart disease, but many assume that drugs and procedures are the whole secret to surviving...
Read preview Overview
Why It's Now or Never with Iraq
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Having gotten the inspectors back into Iraq with unfettered access, the Bush administration had better brace itself for the most likely outcome--they will find nothing. Don't get me wrong. Iraq is surely producing weapons...
Read preview Overview
Yoga and Massage: If It's Physical, It's Therapy: Alternative No More, Yoga and Massage Have Come into Their Own as Accepted Ways to Improve Health, Fitness and Emotional Well-Being. A Guide for the Uninitiated
Byline: Josh Ulick Yoga: Believe the Hype Eastern-inspired fitness trends tend to go out of style faster than you can say "TaeBo." But yoga may be here to stay. Developed over centuries, it promises to reduce stress, improve flexibility and perhaps...
Read preview Overview