Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 130, No. 13, September 29

A Deadly Dance: As AIDS Cases Decline Sharply, Some Gay Men Are Returning to Unsafe Sex. They Call It Barebacking
As AIDS cases decline sharply, some gay men are returning to unsafe sex. They call it barebacking. JOSEPH HILBURN GOES FOR AN HIV test every six months and reads everything he can find about AIDS. He certainly doesn't want to get it. Yet that doesn't...
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After Fen-Phen
The loss of two wildly popular weight-loss pills has left many physicians, patients and drugmakers scrambling to find safe and effective alternatives MARGE FRIEL HAS NEVER had much luck with diets. "I can lose weight," she says, "but keeping it...
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'An Affair of the Heart.' (Bill Clinton Comments on the 40th Anniversary of the Forced Integration of the Little Rock School System by Nine African American High School students)(Brief Article)
The president on how the crisis looked then--and what its lessons are now. FORTY YEARS AGO, when the eyes of the world were on the crisis at Central High in Little Rock, I was an 11-year-old student 50 miles away in Hot Springs, Ark. My school system,...
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And Now, Live from Little Rock: The Standoff at Central Was Something New in American Life - an Epic Clash That People Could Watch in Their Living Rooms
The standoff at Central was something new in American life--an epic clash that people could watch in their living rooms. IN THOSE EXTRAORDINARY DAYS WHEN WHITE MOBS ASSAULTED the nine black teenagers trying to enroll at Central, Little Rock became...
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Breaking the Cages: Radical Animal Activists Turn to Violence
Radical animal activists turn to violence DICK SCHUENING, A VETERAN ARSON investigator for the State of Oregon, got the call one morning in July. Someone had firebombed a Redmond slaughterhouse that processed and exported horse meat. This was no...
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Bring on the paraSites: Can a New Breed of Independent Web Entertainers Free Television from the Networks' Monopoly?
Can a new breed of independent Web entertainers free television from the networks' monopoly? IF INTERACTION IS GOING to find its way into the world of television, we shouldn't leave it all to the broadcasters. Case in point is "Moesha," an experimental...
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Chinese Power Grab: He Has Consolidated His Hold on the Government. Now Can Jiang Pull off an Economic Revolution?
He has consolidated his hold on the government. Now can Jiang pull off an economic revolution? QIAO SHI KNEW HE'D BEEN PURGED even before the votes were counted. Last week, standing on a dais in the Great Hall of the People, the 72-year-old parliamentary...
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Clinton's Labor Pains
A Teamster scandal may reach the White House THE IRONY IS THICK. FOR YEARS THE Feds hounded Jimmy Hoffa, the head of the then notoriously corrupt Teamsters union. Whether it was Bobby Kennedy interrogating him in the '50s or the FBI investigating...
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Earning Your Wings: Learning How to Fly a Plane, Even Just a Little, Changes the Way You Walk on the Ground
Learning how to fly a plane, even just a little, changes the way you walk on the ground WHEN MY HUSBAND DECIDED TO TAKE FLYING lessons, his family was, to say the least, shocked. We knew him as the guy whose feet were fixed firmly on the ground....
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Echoes of Little Rock
They were the brave kids who faced the mob at Central High. Now, 40 years later, they can finally tell their stories. MINNIJEAN BROWN TRICKEY LIGHTS UP JUST TO think back on it, the corners of her broad face--the eyes, the mouth that can screw down...
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Fishing Buddies: As DreamWorks Finally Releases Its First Movie, the Partners Are Still Learning to Work Together
As DreamWorks finally releases its first movie, the partners are still learning to work together ON FRIDAY, THE MOVING-PICTURE version of the DreamWorks logo will flicker in theaters for the first time. Oh--and then there'll be a movie: DreamWorks'...
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For Humans, Evolution Ain't What It Used to Be
AMONG LARGE LAND animals, there's one species that eats the others for breakfast, and you know which it is. The rise of human beings to the top of the food chain was so astonishingly swift and decisive that it's natural to view the evolution of intelligent...
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Getting Others to Toe Your Line
Your sister adores your 6-year-old. She babysits frequently and buys any toys your daughter wants, but the one thing she doesn't provide is discipline. And your daughter's behavior is getting out of control Your mom is watching your new baby so...
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Hope for 'Snow Babies:' a Mother's Cocaine Use May Not Doom Her Child after All
A mother's cocaine use may not doom her child after all THE EPIDEMIC OF CRACK COCAINE had just hit the inner cities in the mid-1980s when pediatricians and hospital nursery workers began reporting truly harrowing observations: babies born to women...
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Important Facts about Children & Nutrition
Here's how to help your children eat healthy. Americans are bombarded with food facts, eat-healthy advice and the results of the latest study, Puzzled parents wonder whether they're feeding their kids properly or setting them up for a lifetime of...
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Inside the FCC's Billion-Dollar Boo-Boo
Bungled paperwork roils the wireless industry EMEMBER THE TALE OF THE philosopher who was so busy looking at the stars that he didn't watch where he was going and fen into a pit? If so, you can sympathize with the Federal Communications Commission....
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Is This Trip Necessary: This Week NASA Puts Another American on Mir
This week NASA puts another American on Mir American astronaut Michael Foale. Since he arrived on the Russian space station Mir in May, Foale has endured three major computer failures, two oxygen-generator malfunctions, contaminated drinking water,...
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Junior's League: Baseball's Best Player Can Hit, Run, Catch - and Grin
Baseball's best player can hit, run, catch--and grin. Witness the Zen of Ken. KEN GRIFFEY JR. MOON-WALKS across the turf behind the batting cage in Seattle's Kingdome, his hat backward , his smile infections, his banter with teammates ceaseless...
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Lessons from South Africa
A reporter who covered the rise of Winnie Mandela recalls how the foreign press helped create an icon who acted with impunity. Winnie Mandela is scheduled to go before a closed-door session of South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission this...
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Meet Charles the Good: One of the Sad Ironies of Diana's Death Is That It Gives the Prince a Chance to Improve His Image
One of the sad ironies of Diana's death is that it gives the prince a chance to improve his image SUDDENLY LAST WEEK A Charles we hadn't seen before made an appearance. Or, at least, he was a Charles we hadn't noticed. Behind the familiar facade...
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Mr. Show with Bob and David
'Alternative' sketch comedy on HBO's 'Mr. Show' BOB ODENKIRK AND DAVID CROSS, stars of HBO's Mr. Show With Bob and David," are almost famous. Famous enough to get a ''YO!" from the beer-bellied guy inflating the 20-foot-high rubber Budweiser can...
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Primakov on Peace: 'I Do Not Envy Madeleine.'(Russian Foreign Minister Yevgeny Primakov; Secretary of State Madeleine Albright)(Interview)
Russia's foreign minister declares his country intends to expand its role in the Mideast YEVGENY PRIMAKOV HAS SET AN ambitious agenda for his trip to the United States this week. In meetings with both President Clinton and Secretary of State Madeleine...
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Revenge of the Britpack
A show called 'Sensation' shocks the London press. But viewers are lining up to be offended. CLAUDE RAINS AS CAPT. LOUIS renault was shocked--shocked--to find gambling going on at Rick s Place in "Casablanca." He'd have been really shocked if he...
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Take a Step in the Right Direction
We all live in a world that is pretty overwhelming. Especially when it comes to personal finances. Fact is, it costs a lot of money to cover even basic living expenses: mortgage or rent, car payments, insurance and food. Sometimes, the size of these...
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The Ice Storm
Ang Lee explores angst in the sterile '70s A CHILL IS IN THE AIR. IN THE SUBURban Connecticut town of New Canaan, winter approaches. It's 1973, a year of waterbeds, Watergate and wife swapping. Two well-off American families--the Hoods and the Carvers--are...
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The Land of the Handout
Ted Turner made it seem so simple. The market's up, and the world's needs are greater than ever. So why not Idek off a new golden age of giving? But our culture of charity is more complicated than Turner might think THE DAY AFTER TED TURNER announced...
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The Prosecutor Problem: Clinton's Dialing for Dollars May Force Reno's Hand
Clinton's dialing for dollars may force Reno's hand IT WAS BEGINNING TO LOOK AS IF AL Gore would take all the heat. When Attorney General Janet Reno announced earlier this month that her staff was investigating the vice president's questionable...
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Think before You Give: Why Our Favorite Worthy Causes Are Not Always the Neediest Ones. A Guide to Smarter Charity
Why our favorite worthy causes are not always the neediest ones. A guide to smarter charity. ANDREW CARNEGIE, THE 19TH-CENTURY steel magnate who started giving his fortune away while still in his 30s, had a touch of the Scottish radical in him....
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Treasure of the Badlands: How Much Is That T. Rex in the Hillside?
How much is that T. rex in the hillside? ON A BLAZING DAY THIS summer in the badlands of Montana, a group of fossil hunters found a few bones on what they thought was private land. "There weren't enough to fill a third of a sandwich bag," recalls...
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TV Meets the Web: The Latest Tech Trend Is 'Convergence.' (WebTV Networks)
The latest tech trend is 'convergence.' THE SCENE; A CROWDED VIDEO studio in midtown Manhattan. Lights blaze. Cameras whir. Theme music blares as a live audience welcomes the host, who reads his 1Lues off a TelePrompTer. "The Tonight Show" with...
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When Buying Toys, Aim for Safe & Stimulating
In the movie "Toy Story," the toys peer anxiously out the window as guests arrive for a child's birthday party. Fear grips the toys, who worry that the birthday boy will embrace his new toys and banish them to the closet. Wouldn't it be great if...
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When the Sniffles Mean More Than a Cold
Children seem to pick up colds as quickly as they latch onto the latest trendy toy. It seems that sneezing and sniffles are just part of childhood, But when the runny nose and sneezing last longer than a week or recur frequently, an allergic reaction...
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Why Ted Gave It Away: In an Autumnal Mood, Ted Turner Springs a $1 Billion Gift on the United Nations
In an autumnal mood, Ted Turner springs a $1 billion gift on the United Nations--and unabashedly challenges other rich guys to pony up, too. AS TED TURNER TELLS IT, HIS LIFE'S thrilling new mission was revealed to him in the form of a net-worth...
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Your Child's Development: Birth to Preschool
Comparing one child's progress to another's has become the spectator sport of the '90s. Competition among parents of young children can be lively, with bragging rights and the child's emotional and physical health hanging in the balance. Whenever...
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