Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 135, No. 7, February 14

A Bit of Advice: Don't Go There! Dear Hillary: Renovate the New Kitchen, Write a Book. Forget the Senate and Follow the Cash
Dear Hillary, Love the hair. Like the house. All the best. Think you're nuts. Not nuts to move to New York, of course, which I consider the center of the universe (although you overshot the epicenter, the corner of 57th and Fifth, where I've asked...
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Any Given Sundance: Utah's Annual Indie-Film Festival Mines Some Gems
Demonstrative doesn't begin to describe the audiences at the recent Sundance Film Festival. Maybe they're so happy to be out of the freezing Utah air they leap to their feet to cheer just to get their circulation going. At this annual Super Bowl for...
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A Sign of Civility in an Uncivilized World: By Sharing Our Classic Car with Other People, We've Discovered How Courteous and Restrained They Can Be
"It's OK to touch this car." That's what the sign says. Held down by the windshield wiper of our sleek, black 1952 Jaguar XK 120 roadster, the small sign elicits smiles and encourages people to call out to their friends to come and see. We put it on...
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A Very Human Hero: Yes, He's a Maverick. Operating by the Seat of His Pants, John McCain Has Embarked on What Amounts to a Hostile Takeover of the GOP. What He's Really Like-And What His Wild Ride May Ultimately Mean for the Country
On those rare occasions when he has time to watch TV, John McCain, like most politicians, has a weakness for C-Span. One of the programs he enjoys is called "Question Time," where the British prime minister each week faces a grilling from a selected...
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Battling 'The Bad Guys': Colombia's President vs. Drug Lords, Leftist Rebels and Right-Wing Paramilitaries
Today narco-guerrillas threaten Colombia's survival as a democracy. Its president, Andres Pastrana, is striving to bring peace to the beleaguered nation by negotiating with the guerrillas who control nearly half his country. The oldest democracy in...
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Coming out Swinging: To Beat Gore, Bradley Now Believes, He Must Throw More Punches-And Risk Seeming like the Kind of Pol He Scorns
Nobody kills a pep rally quicker than Bill Bradley. As his campaign tried to fire up the troops leading up to the New Hampshire primary, Bradley's discomfort onstage was painfully obvious. After receiving thunderous introductions from Minnesota Sen....
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Crunch Time at Kellogg: The Dethroned Cereal Giant Launches a Snack-Food Blitz to Win Back Customers. Kimchi-Flavored Treats?
Growing up in Cleveland, Terri Manns started her day with a bowl of Kellogg's Raisin Bran. But now, Manns's day begins with "pure chaos" as she rushes to get her two kids to school and herself to the office. "I'm lucky to make it to work," says the...
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How He's Catching a Cash Wave: In an Online Gold Rush, McCain Nets Big Bucks
The techies in the McCain campaign had it all figured out. When the Arizona senator proclaimed victory in the New Hampshire primary last Tuesday night, they made sure the candidate was positioned in front of a giant blue banner with the campaign's...
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Inside Hillary's D.C. Game: She Has Played a Major Role on 'Her' Issues. Now That She's Running for the Senate, Her Aides Want the Word Out
Rarely able to sleep in, Hillary Clinton got up early one February morning in 1995 and glanced at stories on the front page of The Washington Post. Nothing too exciting: a federal crackdown on telemarketers, a marathon swimmer setting a record. Then...
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Instant Recall
It was a day to remember. on the eve of the 2000 U.S. Memory Championship, the prelude to August's Mind Sports Olympiad, peri invited founder Tony Buzan to visit Newsweek and run a mini- memory match of our own. The players: "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire's"...
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Mansions off the Rack: For $10 Million, Not Just a House, but a Lifestyle
Your first surprise when you visit the new development of Oceanfront, 23 miles south of Santa Monica, Calif., is that it's actually on the ocean; in real-estate parlance, a name like that may just mean it's in a state with a coastline. The houses aren't...
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Money and Murder in Old London Town
London, 1719. Benjamin Weaver, once a famed boxer and now a sort of private investigator and tough-guy-for-hire, is walking the dark streets when he comes upon a gang of rich young hooligans about to slice up an elderly man for sport. Weaver never...
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Nothing but Garnett: He Skips College, Joins the NBA at 19 and Swiftly Becomes the Highest-Paid Player in Team Sports. Then Kevin Garnett Turns into an Arrogant, Immature Jerk, Right? Wrong and Here's Why
Kevin Garnett is a gifted mimic. He steps off the basketball court and seconds later is on a rollicking roll, from the late rapper Tupac Shakur to a dead-on Tony Montana, the Al Pacino mobster in "Scarface," to quick riffs goofing on his Minnesota...
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Perspectives
"New Hampshire has long been known as a bump in the road for front runners, and this year is no exception." Republican presidential hopeful George W. Bush, after being romped in the state's primary, referring to New Hampshire's tradition of rejecting...
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'Ready for Prime Time?': Bush's Top Strategist Faces a Fight He Never Expected
Karl Rove and George W. Bush have been partners in politics for a quarter century, so it was up to Rove to deliver the bad news. It was his duty, as a consultant, to cadge early exit polls, and by lunch on Election Day in New Hampshire he had them....
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<SMALLCAPS>IPO</SMALLCAPS>s: Jumping over the Moon: After a Year of Easy Money, Everyone Wants a Piece of the Hot New-Issue Game
You can hear them mustering in the streets, waving banners, shaking fists and shouting "I want my IPO." Investors see easy money being made, and expect a cut. In the old days (say, two years ago), brokers joked that IPO meant "It's probably overpriced."...
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Smooth as Santana: Three Decades after His Star Turn at Woodstock, a Rock-Guitar Legend Returns with a Hit Album and Powers Up for a Big Night at the Grammys
In a couple of weeks, at this year's Grammy awards--where he's nominated in 10 categories--we'll all get to watch what's almost certain to be the uplifting conclusion of the Carlos Santana comeback story, but only two people witnessed the beginning....
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Social Fabric
JUSTICE Another Letter From the Unabomber Theodore J. Kaczynski believes there is a fate worse than death: having the whole world think you're crazy. In a handwritten brief recently filed by Kaczynski, better known as the infamous Unabomber,...
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Spiraling into the Sea: Questions about Alaska Airlines' Safety Rules
Airlines have elaborate procedures for caring for the families of the dead. Last week, as soon as Alaska Airlines Flight 261 plunged into the Pacific, killing all 88 aboard, the company assigned two employees to every victim's family to attend to their...
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Sturm Und Drang: Jorg Haider, a Nationalist with a Soft Spot for Hitler's Nazis, Becomes the Key Player in Austria's New Government-And Ignites an Uproar across Europe
The serene alpine nation of Austria had never seen anything like it. For five consecutive days last week, the elegant streets of downtown Vienna were packed with raucous demonstrators. Thousands of young people marched through the city, past the wedding-cake...
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Their Burning Love
Looks like Lisa Marie Presley is a sucker for a serenade. Elvis's daughter, 32, is engaged again, this time to singer John Oszajca, 25. It's her third attempt at harmony with a musician. Before Michael Jackson, she was married to bassist Danny Keough,...
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The McCain Mutiny: Deflating George W. Bush's Great Expectations, John McCain Pulls off a Decisive Upset in New Hampshire. Can the Straight-Talking War Hero Go the Distance? Behind His Big Win-And the Tough Battles Ahead
It was 106 in Charleston last Aug. 1. the air was as hot and as thick as she-crab soup. A touring bus called "The Straight Talk Express" was on its maiden voyage. Its captain, John McCain, U.S. Navy (Ret.), was cruising the Low Country landscape all...
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The Woman by His Side: Watchful and Protective, Cindy McCain Adjusts to the Trail
From middle distance, Cindy McCain seems shy, a little fragile, a suburban matron with a rich father and a degree from USC--"the University of Spoiled Children," her husband likes to tease. Watch her on the campaign trail, however, and she comes across...
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Two Giants Join Forces
Many readers who wrote to us were annoyed or puzzled by our decision to put the AOL-Time Warner merger on our Jan. 24 cover. "Do you really think that many people care much about the merger?" queried one, echoing the views of quite a few others. The...
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Way, Way out of Bounds: Yet Another Star NFL Player Is Charged with Murder
These should have been the glory days of Ray Lewis's young football career. At the NFL Players Association pre-Super Bowl banquet, the 24-year-old Baltimore Ravens star was honored as the league's premier linebacker. After the game, he was headed to...
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When Justice Lets Us Down: It's Happening More and More: A Convicted Criminal, Heading for Execution, Is Sprung by DNA Tests. and If the Innocent Are in Jail, the Guilty Are Still out There
The warden was seated at the head of a long table when Ron Williamson was led into the office and told to sit down. Once, Williamson had been a professional baseball player, the hero jock who married the beauty queen in his small Oklahoma town. Now,...
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