Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 28

A Renovation of the Rosary
Byline: Kenneth L. Woodward For 500 years, devout Roman Catholics have recited the rosary, a mantra-like series of Our Fathers and Hail Marys designed to stimulate meditation on 15 key events or "mysteries" in the lives of Jesus and his mother....
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A Wide World of Trouble: While Bush Pushes War against Iraq, New Threats Loom from Al Qaeda and North Korea. Can We Fight on All These Fronts?
Byline: Michael Hirsh, Tamara Lipper and Michael Isikoff George Tenet could not have been more plain-spoken. "They are coming after us," the CIA director warned last week, on the edge of his seat, glaring. "The threat environment we find ourselves...
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'Bin Laden Is a Hero': Abu Bakar Bashir Looks like a Gentle Cleric. but His Words Are Chilling, and Investigators Believe He Leads a Terror Network
Byline: Joe Cochrane Dressed in flowing white robes, Abu Bakar Bashir sat quietly on a straw mat last Wednesday in a house in a blue-collar neighborhood of south Jakarta. The grandfatherly 64-year-old, whose face is adorned with thick glasses and...
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Cheap Seats to Europe
Byline: Arthur Frommer It smacks of panic. But if you're a traveler, it's the happiest kind of commercial hysteria. Starting Nov. 1, a fall or winter trip to Europe is priced so low as to defy reason. It's either a conscious decision by the big...
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China's Coal Addiction: Health: It Fuels the Economy, but the Mines Also Are Producing Safety Problems. What to Do?
Byline: Sarah Schafer Deep into the night shift at the Fuyuan Coal Mine last May, Zhang Qijian noticed a slight trickle of water running through the cramped, murky tunnel where he and the other miners were digging. Suddenly one of the shaft's support...
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Close, but No Cigar: The Vatican Pushes Back the U.S. Plan on Sex Abuse
Byline: Kenneth L. Woodward Fashioned in haste and high emotional heat, the U.S. Roman Catholic bishops' plan for dealing with sexually abusive priests--sent to Rome for approval four months ago--got the Vatican's response last week: good start,...
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Cries from the Heart: It's Nirvana's Moment Again with a 'New' Hit-And a Raw, Revealing Book of the Late Kurt Cobain's Diaries. an Exclusive Excerpt
Byline: Lorraine Ali Kurt Cobain introduced me to karaoke. In May 1991, Nirvana was promoting its upcoming major-label debut "Nevermind"--an album that would sell more than 10 million copies, revitalize rock and roll and teach Michael Jackson, who...
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Don't Feed the Fundamentalists: While the Administration Has a Coherent Military Strategy, It Does Not Have a Political One. on That Front, the War on Terror Is Failing
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Last week George Tenet warned us that Al Qaeda is armed and dangerous. He pointed to the series of threats and attacks around the world--from Kuwait to Yemen to Bali--as evidence that the organization is rejuvenated and in...
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Don't Worry, Be Happy: OPINION: China Is Crackling with Energy, Youth and Hope. Here's the Case for Optimism
Byline: Chris Patten Every day the headlines warn us about the awesome social, economic and environmental problems confronting China. But however much I read the papers, I still find it difficult to change my view: I am bullish on China. To be a...
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Iraq's Blood Drive: A NEWSWEEK Correspondent Returns to Baghdad and Finds the Same Madness-And Whispered Dissent
Byline: Rod Nordland Every time I arrive in Iraq, the experience is a shock. The place always seems exactly the same, only worse. More bare-faced corruption. More overblown monuments and palaces and portraits of Saddam Hussein. More gory displays...
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Jimmy Carter, Disappointed
Byline: George F. Will Jimmy Carter, whose reputation as a better ex-president than president constitutes damnation with the faintest possible praise, is a Christian whose services to his faith include making vivid the scarlet sin of pride. He is...
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Mail Call: Resurgence of a Virulent Scourge?
Readers still absorbing the possibility of a smallpox attack were nevertheless heartened by reports of our government's mobilization and inoculation plans ("Operation Smallpox," Oct. 14). One letter writer viewed the threat of an outbreak as coming...
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Mere Words Can't Describe Sigur Ros
Byline: --Devin Gordon In the annals of pretentious album titles, the latest CD by the critically revered Icelandic band Sigur Ros sets a new--and perhaps insurmountable--benchmark. Until now the champ was probably Fiona Apple, whose second CD had...
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Movin' to Broadway: Twyla Tharp Heads Uptown with Billy Joel
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan In Twyla Tharp's very first public performance, back in 1965, she danced briefly to Petula Clark's pop hit "Downtown." No one covered the event. "I was really pissed," Tharp recalled over breakfast last week, still sounding...
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Newsmakers
Byline: John Horn, Katherine Stroup On the Trail of 'X-Men' No fewer than four Marvel comic books will be teleported into movies next year: "Daredevil," "Hulk," "The Punisher" and "X2," the sequel to "X-Men," the 2000 blockbuster that started...
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Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom, left to right: New York Times, azcentral.com, Associated Press, The Washington Post, L.A. Times, Associated Press, New York Times, Bay City News, Reuters, Yahoo! News, Associated Press (2) "They are...
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Point and Bet: Internet Gambling's Explosive Growth Has Made It the Web's Killer App. Now Critics Are Trying to Pull the Plug
Byline: John Horn Scores of visitors stream into the Barrymore Beach Club on the tiny Caribbean island of Antigua on a recent morning. But none of them swim in the warm water or sip tropical drinks on the white-sand beach. That's because they have...
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Pull the Trigger on Fingerprints
Byline: Jonathan Alter Imagine if the Customs Service had a new technology that helped prevent unlawful entry by foreigners into the United States. It wasn't guaranteed to nail every terrorist sneaking in; a few could doctor passports or otherwise...
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Safety in Shopping: CONSUMERISM: Brand-Conscious Kids Are Transforming the Urban Lifestyle. Will the Older Generation Accept It?
Byline: Hung Huang China is one of the most brand-conscious markets in the world. As a publisher of lifestyle magazines in the country, I like to consider myself an unofficial expert on today's high-end Chinese consumers. It is, after all, my business...
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Shots in the Dark: A Sniper Strikes Again-Leaving Scant Clues, a Traumatized Capital and Growing Fears of a Terror Connection
Byline: Suzanne Smalley and Evan Thomas Once again, a single shot, out of the darkness. Shortly after 8:30 on Saturday night, a 37-year-old man was gunned down outside a Ponderosa SteakHouse in Ashland, Va., 90 miles south of Washington. Hit in...
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The Bipolar Stock Market
Byline: Allan Sloan When I look at the stock market these days, I can't help but think of what we used to say about the weather when I worked in Detroit during the 1970s: "Wait five minutes, it will change." You don't have to wait even that long,...
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The Chinese Split Personality: ECONOMICS: It Is a Country Divided Not Just into Rich and Poor but Five Distinct Regions, Each with Its Own Challenges
Byline: Minxin Pei For those who know China well, there is no greater sin than to suggest the country does not make sense as a single colossus. Wonder aloud if it would be better off being chopped into smaller and more manageable states, and your...
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The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker Over the years, we've run many stories that document the awful toll of drug abuse. But I don't think we've ever published a more powerful anti-drug testament than this week's excerpt from Kurt Cobain's "Journals." That wasn't...
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The Great Salmon Debate: A Critical Backlash against Salmon Farms Raises Questions about Whether This Icon of Healthy Eating Is Such a Miracle Fish after All
Byline: Jerry Adler When you think about how good salmon really is for you, you have to wonder, why would you ever eat anything else? That, at least, appears to be the premise behind Dr. Nicholas Perricone's "Nutritional Face-Lift," the three-day...
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The Last Days of Disco: The Soft Money's about to Evaporate. Ballot Reform Is on Its Way. Election 2002 Takes on an Apocalyptic Air
Byline: Howard Fineman Tim Johnson has an enormous buffalo hide nailed to the wall of his Senate office, a gift from South Dakota's Intertribal Bison Co-op. "I've been endorsed by all nine tribal councils in the state," he said proudly as he prepared...
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The Other Wireless: After Years of Empty Promises, Bluetooth Finally Delivers. Kiss Those Ugly Computer Cables Goodbye
Byline: N'Gai Croal Do you fear the tangle? You know, that serpentine mess of cables behind your PC, connecting it to the keyboard, printer, scanner, modem, handheld computer, digital camera, MP3 player and any other peripheral that you may have...
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The Portland Six: Getting Close to Afghanistan
Byline: Ron Gluckman The seven muscular men would have stood out in any hotel. All heavily bearded, they hung around the lobby, doing chin-ups from the rafters and sparring in the courtyard of the Chini Bagh Hotel in Kashgar, China, where I saw...
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The Secret of the Stradivarius Sound: My Dad Discovered It, and Used It to Build His Own Masterpiece. It's Still out There-Somewhere
Byline: Dana Wall When I was a boy, my father told me he could do anything he wanted to do. I believed him. Dad said he wanted to become the first photographer in Sioux City to develop color prints. He did, and his prints were displayed for weeks...
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The Troubles, Again: 'Bloody Sunday' Re-Creates an Infamous Irish Battle
Byline: David Ansen Watching director Paul Greengrass's explosive "Bloody Sunday," you have to remind yourself at moments that you're not looking at a documentary. The movie recreates the violent confrontation between civil-rights marchers and British...
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Time to Shoot for the Moon: SPACE TRAVEL: Beijing's Leaders Hope a Manned Launch by 2010 Will Symbolize Chinese Technological Mastery
Byline: Melinda Liu Space travel is deeply imprinted on the Chinese imagination. Ever since China's first rocket hurtled toward the heavens in 1970, millions of Chinese have dreamed of the day their country would reach up and explore the stars....
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Zhu Rongji's Promise: REFORM: Despite the Skeptics, the Prime Minister Largely Fulfilled His Promise to Fix State-Owned Enterprises
Byline: Nicholas Lardy Zhu Rongji began his tenure as China's prime minister with a promise. During his now-famous March 1998 press conference at the National People's Congress, the bold and freewheeling Zhu pledged that within three years he would...
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