Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 3

A Reverse Midas Touch: Paul Allen Won with Microsoft, but His Current Bets Are Losers
Byline: Brad Stone Paul Allen throws great parties. At least once a year, the cofounder of Microsoft and fourth wealthiest citizen on the planet--with a fortune that Forbes estimates at $21 billion--invites friends, family and luminaries of entertainment...
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Being Sarah Pettit: Editor, Gay Activist and Happy Warrior: Sarah B. Pettit, 1966-2003
Byline: David Gates Maybe one reader in a thousand knew Sarah Pettit's name, but they knew her mind and sensibility, which would have pleased her just as much. (Well, more or less just as much.) From the spring of 1999 until her death last week,...
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'Being Shot at Is No Fun': Bombs, Screaming Men and the Terror of Uncertainty. A Vietnam Vet Remembers
Byline: Wayne Downing Right up front I want to assert that I am no hero, but I know some true American heroes who not only survived on the battlefield but led their men to extraordinary achievements against overwhelming odds. I was adequate at best...
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Caesar Slept Here: A 3-D Re-Creation at UCLA Lets You Roam Ancient Rome
Byline: Andrew Murr It's a sunny morning, perfect for a leisurely stroll. The date: A.D. 400. You walk up the steps of the Temple of Vesta, where inside, six virgins tend an eternal flame (and risk being buried alive if they, well, you know). Crossing...
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Civil Rights: Time to Get Back on the Bus
Byline: Elise Christenson It's every "Antiques Roadshow" enthusiast's dream. That old surplus bus Montgomery, Ala., resident Roy H. Sommerfield bought in 1970 and has been storing in the backyard for the last 30 years turns out to be the bus where...
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Do-It-Yourself Isn't Dead Yet: Day Trading Was All the Rage during the Bull Run. but Even with Stocks Falling, Many Are Still at It, and Adding New Recruits. Just Don't Call Them 'Day Traders' Now
Correction: 2/12/03 Our Feb. 3 article "Do-It-Yourself Isn't Dead Yet" misidentified a Connecticut accountant. His name is Robert A. Green. ------------------------------------------- Byline: Daniel McGinn There are no lava lamps in the office,...
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Fallout: Gauging the Human Toll: From Casualties to a Possible Refugee Crisis, New Reports Suggest a War's Health Consequences Could Be Devastating
Byline: Geoffrey Cowley Saddam Hussein is clearly a health hazard to his country and the world, but war poses risks of its own. How grave are they? As the Bush team plans for a military assault, outside experts are struggling to assess the likely...
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Farewell to 'Aunt Flo': A New Version of the Birth-Control Pill Would Limit Menstruation to Four Times a Year. Are Women Ready?
Byline: Claudia Kalb Ask a bunch of women if they enjoy getting monthly periods and a significant majority (at least according to our own water-cooler survey) will answer "No!" Still, a woman's cycle has long been seen as a healthy and inevitable...
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Fear at the Front: All Soldiers Are Brave in the Face of Battle-Until the Battle Breaks out. the War of Nerves, and How the Troops Preparing for Conflict with Iraq Are Coping with It
Byline: Evan Thomas I want to go to combat," says Sgt. Mathew Figley of the Second Brigade, Third Infantry Division, as he slouches in the back of his Bradley Fighting Vehicle in the desert wastes of northern Kuwait, a few miles from the Iraqi border....
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Get Ready for the Blizzard: Here Come Dividend Funds Touting Income and Safety, Now That Bush's Tax-Cut Plan Is Giving Wall Street Something New to Sell
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn This is not your grandfather's stock market. You'll be seeing more ads for old-fashioned income investing, now that the president plans to make dividends fully or partly tax-exempt. But younger, growth-stock investors may...
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Getting Physical: A New Fitness Philosophy Puts Gym Teachers on the Front Lines in the Battle against Childhood Obesity
Byline: Peg Tyre Twice a week, Kale Granda, an eighth grader at Titusville Middle School in rural Pennsylvania, changes into his gym clothes, straps on a heart-rate monitor and mounts a GameRider, a stationary bike attached to a PlayStation. For...
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Giving Protest a Chance: A New Kind of Conflict Begets a New Kind of Dissent. Can a Pre-Emptive Peace Strike Work? Only If Washington Listens
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores The 30-second TV spot opens with actress Susan Sarandon staring into the camera. "Before our kids start coming home from Iraq in body bags and women and children start dying in Iraq," she lectures solemnly, "I need to...
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Good as Gold: The Oscar Race Is Heating Up, So NEWSWEEK Gathered the Most Exciting Supporting Actors and Actresses of the Year for an Ad Hoc, Um, Support Group. A Revealing Talk about Movies
Byline: Jeff Giles and David J. Jefferson Every year, as Oscar season comes to a boil, NEWSWEEK invites leading contenders in some category or other to sit around a table and see if they hate each other. They never do. (OK, to be honest, one year...
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Health: Herbal Stress Buster?
Byline: Anne Underwood As a Soviet soldier in Afghanistan in 1979, Zakir Ramazanov discovered a tonic that helped him reduce stress, while boosting mental and physical energy. It wasn't alcohol, but tea--made from the golden-yellow roots of a Siberian...
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Howard Dean: Not Nuancing
Byline: George F. Will Howard Dean breakfasted last week in the 2800 block of Washington's Pennsylvania Avenue, 12 blocks northwest of where he intends to take up residence in 24 months. He ate responsibly, as befits a physician--no bacon, no eggs,...
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Investigators: The FBI Says, Count the Mosques
Byline: Michael Isikoff Frustrated that his troops are still not aggressive enough in hunting down terrorists, FBI Director Robert Mueller has launched a potentially controversial initiative aimed at making sure that field agents finally get the...
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Kim Jong Il: The Truth Behind the Caricature: By Casting Him as the Villain, We're Throwing Away Our Chance to Find out What He Really Represents
Byline: Don Gregg As one with long experience in the Vietnam War--first in Washington, D.C., as we slid into the abyss and later as a CIA officer in the provinces surrounding Saigon--I am deeply concerned by the American establishment's tendency...
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Looking on the Bright Side: Fear Has Long Paralyzed Western Policy toward the Middle East. and What Has Come of This? Repression, Radical Islam and Terror
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Yesterday, a discussion on the meaning of love turned--as did every discussion at Davos this year--to one subject, America and Iraq. Most European and Middle Eastern participants at the conference think a war with Iraq would...
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Man, Machine and the Myth: The Chess Legend, Who Lost to IBM's Deep Blue Computer Five Years Ago, Says He's Better Prepared for His Next Match against a Machine
Byline: Steven Levy The world's greatest chess player (human variety) is famously aggressive, but also knows how to spin. At a press conference before taking on the current computer champion this week, Garry Kasparov described his loss to IBM's...
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Newsmakers
Byline: Devin Gordon; Malcolm Jones Once Upon a Time in Park City One of the best films at this year's Sundance Festival is about a dwarf who digs trains, and stars Peter Dinklage, whom you've never heard of. One of the worst stars Macaulay Culkin....
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Perils of Victory: No One Doubts That America Will Win a War with Iraq. but Many Wonder If It Will Win the Peace
Byline: Christopher Dickey He was absorbed already in the dilemmas of Democracy and the responsibilities of the West; he was determined--I learnt that very soon--to do good, not to any individual person but to a country, a continent, a world." President...
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Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom, left to right: New York Times, Fox News, New York Times, The Washington Post, Reuters, CNN, Associated Press, Yahoo News, Etonline.Com, Associated Press "Time is running out." Deputy Defense Secretary...
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The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker This was a very sad week for us at NEWSWEEK. Our friend and colleague, Sarah Pettit, passed away at 36 after a yearlong struggle with lymphoma. On page 62, David Gates remembers Sarah more eloquently than I possibly could....
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'The Perfect Crime': GHB Is Colorless, Odorless, Leaves the Body within Hours-And Is Fueling a Growing Number of Rapes
Correction; 2/12/03 We said that the trial for Andrew Luster took place in San Diego ("'The Perfect Crime'," Feb. 3). In fact, it was in Ventura, Calif. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Byline: Suzanne Smalley...
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Transition: The Line Kings Exit the Stage
Byline: Peter Plagens Al Hirschfeld, 99, was to the art of caricature what... Al Hirschfeld was to the art of caricature. The man who showed up at Broadway openings in a long black coat, black hat and Moses-like white beard to sit in the dark and...
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'Trust Me' Isn't Good Enough: Bush Sometimes Sounds like President Peeve, as If It's Someone Else's Fault He Can't Find-Or at Least Talk About-Harder Evidence
Byline: Jonathan Alter Imagine you're a soldier headed into harm's way in Iraq. If the system is working right, you've been issued a reliable chemical-biological protective garment, plus a backup. But if you're fighting in a contaminated area--a...
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War and Consequences: The Evidence against Iraq Is Scanty, the Global Opposition to an Attack Growing More Vocal. but the Bush Team's Biggest Dove Has Now Grown Talons. Will War Make Us More-Or Less-Secure?
Correction: 2/12/03 In the graphic "Bound For Battle" (Feb. 3), we incorrectly stated the location of Hurlburt Field. It is in Florida, not Georgia. --------------------------------------------------- Byline: Richard Wolffe and Michael Hirsh Something...
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