Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 130, No. 22, December 1

1: Thaw Turkey; 2: Buy Bonds
With markets in turmoil and tax rules in flux, here's a checklist of year-end money maneuvers MONEY MANAGER PETER FORBES has been logging a lot of phone time since the market started tossing and turning a few weeks ago. He's not doing much trading;...
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A Deadly Kind of Charm
Did a mysterious Gypsy family use romantic wiles to seduce, fleece and poison lonely elderly prey? RICHARD NELSON COULD HARDLY believe his good fortune. The 92-year-old San Francisco widower was standing in a checkout line at Safeway in early 1993...
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A Five-Sister Sideshow
World-famous, the Dionnes were used infamously CECILE DIONNE IS worried about the McCaughey septuplets, and who can blame her? "I hope their lives will not be the tragedy our lives have been," she says. Cecile, 63, is one of the Dionne quintuplets,...
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And Now, It's Korea: Asia's Funk Deepens, but Look for the Silver Lining
Asia's funk deepens, but look for the silver lining NOT MANY PEOPLE HAVE HEARD of Tong Yang, South Korea's biggest investment bank. But it wasn't very long ago that its hot-handed execs, like Kim Chong Dae, envisioned their firm as an Asian Merrill...
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A New Breed of Killers
Like the Luxor gunmen, they answer only to God THEY SANG, THEY DANCED, THEY praised their god-and they slaughtered everyone in sight. When the killing spree was over in Luxor, Egypt, last week, 58 foreign tourists lay dead. Most of the victims were...
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Arms like Lead! Hit 'Em in the Head! Pro Football Awakens to a Concussion Crisis
Pro football awakens to a concussion crisis BEFORE THE RECENT NFL SHOW-DOWN between Dallas and San Francisco, Troy Aikman and Steve Young joked with their agent that the contest ought to be dubbed the "Concussion Bowl." The two superstar quarterbacks...
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A Tactical Retreat in a Race Case; Civil Rights Leaders Buy Themselves out of a Bind
Civil-rights leaders buy themselves out of a bind TO SUPPORTERS OF AFFIRMATIVE ACTION, it was the legal case from hell. To opponents, it was heaven-sent. In 1989 the Piscataway, N.J., school board laid off Sharon Taxman, a white business-ed teacher,...
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Autos: Divide and Conquer - Meet the Researcher Behind GM's Controversial Marketing Strategy
Meet the researcher behind GM's controversial marketing strategy IMAGINE YOU'RE IN THE market for a family car. Stop by a Toyota dealership and watch the salesman steer you toward the Camry, the only midsize car Toyota sells. Over at Honda they'll...
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Bringing the Loot 24/7: He's the Bail Bondsman of Choice for Jailed Rap Stars
He's the bail bondsman of choice for jailed rap stars ASK JOSH HERMAN IF HE CAN REMEMBER the moment he realized he was a success, and the burly 26-year-old doesn't hesitate. It was Feb. 21, 1996, the night he attended his client Snoop Doggy Dogg's...
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Bundles of ... Joy?
One baby at a time is child's play. Raising multiples takes a village--and then some. MANY PARENTS, LIKE THE MCCAUGHEYS, regard their children as gifts from God, which is very good for the children. The implied corollary-- God wants you to get out...
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'Didn't Seem like Much.'(skinhead Nathan John Thill's Casual Confession to Murder in Denver, CO)(Brief Article)
A skinhead's chillingly matter-of-fact confession to a random murder caps a spate of violence in Denver NATHAN JOHN THILL sees himself as a "deep thinker" who knows it's "very hard to decide the right thing to do." One night last week Thill, 19,...
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Eat like a Champion
Want to eat like a champion skier? Well, let's start with breakfast. Which of the following do you think is the breakfast of an elite alpine skier? a. 3 cups cereal with skim milk and 2 cups of juice b. 4 pancakes with syrup, yogurt, banana and...
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Exposing the Rape of Nanking
Exclusive excerpts from a Chinese-American author's unflinching re-examination of one of the most horrifying chapters of the second world war. THE CHRONICLE OF humankind's cruelty is a long and sorry tale. But if it is true that even in such horror...
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Getting Down to Cases
Some of Harvard B-school's influential case studies will finally feature women executives WHEN HER FATHER and his business partner both died suddenly in the same month, Victoria Jackson was just 22 years old and about to graduate from college. She...
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Gifts: One Size Fits All
One gift dilemma: finding a single holiday gift that's appropriate for anyone on your list. Another is deciding what to leave under the tree for the people who show up with a gift you weren't prepared to reciprocate. For just such reasons, fruitcake...
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It's Nothing but Chicken Feed: But It's Enough to Bring Down Yeltsin's Key Aide
But it's enough to bring down Yeltsin's key aide ANATOLY CHUBAIS NEVER DREAMED that $90,000 could he so much trouble. That was how much the Russian first deputy prime minister and each of four colleagues were offered last spring to coauthor a book...
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Let Me Eat Cake
For many of us, the winter holidays signal a green light for indulgence in premium desserts. Even strong-willed dieters adopt a "Let me eat cake" attitude in the weeks prior to New Year's resolutions. Judging from the interest in the decadent chocolate...
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Lovin' Spoonfuls
Mix one 'Seinfeld' episode with the basic Starbucks plan, and you get a food phenomenon. Soup: so hot, it's the new coffee. WHILE JERRY SEINFELD GLIBLY humored "Larry King Live" last week, one CNN viewer sat at home, steaming. "I'm calling to order...
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Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
Eastwood explores the dark side of Savannah SENT TO SAVANNAH, GA., TO COVER an elegant, black-tie Christmas party for Town and Country, New York writer John Kelso (John Cusack) finds himself knee deep in Southern eccentrics--and embroiled in a murder...
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Multiplying the Risks: More Group Births Mean More Preemies and, Often, More Problems
More group births mean more preemies and, often, more problems BOBBI AND KENNY MCCAUGHEY seem thrilled to have seven new babies in tow, and last week's headlines show the world is happy for them. But amid the hoopla, it's worth keeping in mind that...
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My Brilliant Career: For Me, the Primary Appeal of Painting Houses Is to See the Immediate, Colorful Results
For me, the primary appeal of painting houses is to see the immediate, colorful results WITH ALL THE COMMOTION ABOUT CROSSING the bridge to the next millennium, 25 years out of the last 100 hardly seems like a big deal. In a country built from the...
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Odds on the Greenhouse
Some of the forecasts of global warming are 90 percent certain. Others are plain wrong. AS FAR AS HISTORIANS can tell, the first attempt to predict the weather through mathematical equations came in 1910, when English physicist Lewis F. Richardson...
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Party Tricks: Shortcuts & Suggestions to Make Entertaining Easy
You can have company over the holidays without obligating yourself for an entire soup-to-nuts shebang. Plan an event that's focused around something other than the food. And send the invitations in lieu of a Christmas card, so you don't have to do...
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Perspectives
Attorney General Janet Reno, reacting to a Weekly World News tabloid cover story that pictured her in a swimsuit and reported that 78 percent of Japanese men surveyed would rather be stranded on an island with her than with any other woman "President...
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Pieces of the Puzzle: The Feds Close in on the Real Flow of Chinese Cash
The Feds close in on the real flow of Chinese cash EVERY WEEK THE FBI AGENT ARRIVES at the Grand National Bank in suburban Los Angeles. Unfailingly polite, hauls away documents pertaining to bank accounts connected to Ted Sioeng, an Indonesian-born...
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Ready for His Close-Up: R&B Hitmaker Babyface Now Rocks Hollywood
R&B hitmaker Babyface now rocks Hollywood EVEN BACK IN JUNIOR HIGH IN INDIANAPOLIS, Kenneth Edmonds--you know him as Babyface--was more or less the guy he is now. He was in his first band then; onstage, he'd let others sing as he hung back,...
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Spending Ted's Money: Tim Wirth on How to Reform the United Nations
Tim Wirth on how to reform the United Nations LAST WEEK TED TURNER PUT TIM Wirth in charge of the philanthropic foundation the media mogul launched this fall to give $1 billion to the United Nations. Wirth, who will leave his post as an undersecretary...
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Spruced Up Evergreens: Froms Asps to Underpants, the Traditions of Kids' Literature Get a Delightful Going-Over This Season
From asps to underpants, the traditions of kids' literature get a delightful going-over this season FLANNERY O'CONNOR ONCE said that when she went to college, nobody mentioned any good Southern writers. "As far as I knew, the heroes of Hawthorne...
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The Apple Looked Good: Today, Adam and Eve Would Claim Temptation Itself as an Extenuating Circumstance
Today, Adam and Eve would claim temptation itself as an extenuating circumstance "And the man said, The woman whom thou gavest to be with me, she gave me of the tree, and I did eat. And the LORD God said unto the woman, What is this that thou hast...
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The Hunt for His Secret Weapons
Saddam's real threat is still with us. How the inspectors got this far, and what lies ahead. THE IMAGES, RAW AND GRUESOME, were a crucial piece of the puzzle. In the summer of 1995, the United Nations Special Committee (UNSCOM) inspectors scouring...
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The Shape of Things That Didn't Come
We got lucky last summer. The world should have ended on Aug. 29, when a secret government satellite called Skynet became self-aware and tried to eradicate all human life. It took Arnold Schwarzenegger, a flurry of time travel and lots of gunfights...
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The U.S. Ski Team: Gold Cup Events
As Olympic Winter Games XVIII near (February 7-22 in Nagano, Japan) a lot of eyes in North America turn again toward a small village in New York's unspoiled Adirondacks: Lake Placid has used the Winter Games as its calling card for over 65 years. ...
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What Now for Wei?
The dissident promises to fight for democracy from America. Back in China, his ideas are already taking root. HE SITS IN THE FIRST-GLASS cabin aboard Northwest Airlines Flight 88 from Beijing, pasty and exhausted after more than 18 years inside...
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Who's in Charge Here?
To avert a military showdown, Russia cuts a deal with Iraq. Clinton is going along for now. But will Saddam play by the rules? Behind the dance over off, weapons and power. THE RED WINE AND VODKA flowing freely at the French mission to the United...
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Why We Should Kill Saddam: The Iraqi Leader Isn't Going Away. That Means Assassination May Be Clinton's Best Option - If Only He'd Talk about It
The Iraqi leader isn't going away. That means assassination may be Clinton's best option--if only he'd talk about it. IN THE MIDDLE OF A CRISIS WITH IRAQ DURING PRESIDENT Clinton's first term, I wondered aloud in an Oval Office meeting about the...
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Will China Be Next? It's Seen as Safe, but Economic Ills Are Contagious
It's seen as safe, but economic ills are contagious HE'S THE BANKERS' new hero. As the markets of East Asia tumble out of anybody's control, global moneymen have found a new beacon of confidence: Zhu Rongji, China's economic czar. At the World Bank's...
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Winning the Gold
Millions will be watching the Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan. They'll see winning and in-depth profiles of athletes, but they won't know what it feels like to win an event with the magnitude of the Olympics or World Championships. I do. Knowing...
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