Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 8

Breeding Grounds: As the AIDS Conference Opens in Spain, Scientists Are Finding New, Potentially Dangerous Viruses in the Monkeys of Central Africa
Byline: Geoffrey Cowley How does a hurricane reach the Caribbean? If you could trace a storm all the way back to its genesis, maybe you'd find a butterfly fanning its wings in West Africa, causing a momentary disturbance that sends stronger currents...
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Drama Queens: In Its Record Third Year, 'Soul Food' Finds Its Voice-And Its Audience
Byline: Allison Samuels Like a good piece of sweet-potato pie, "Soul Food" has finally found the right seasoning. "Soul Food" is the first African-American TV drama to make it to its third season, and its very survival provides a lesson in the ways...
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Exclusive: Osama Bin Laden and the Mystery of the Skull: Tora Bora Samples Examined by Renowned Forensic Sleuth, but Why?
Byline: John Barry Does the United States have the skull of one of Osama bin Laden's lieutenants, or even bin Laden himself? If not, why the mystery about what we have found? In early May, Canadian troops came across a grave site at the Afghan village...
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Freedom vs. Security: Delicate Balance: The Case for 'Smart Profiling' as a Weapon in the War on Terror
Byline: Fareed Zakaria I will always remember July 4, 2001, because a week earlier I became an American citizen. It was a different America one year ago. The country was bathed in peace and plenty, calmly contemplating a mild recession and a sinking...
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Guantanamo Justice? Behind the Wires: Nobody in the Detention Center on the Coast of Cuba Has Access to a Lawyer. the Geneva Conventions Don't Apply. nor Does the U.S. Constitution. So What Happens If Someone Is Stuck There by Mistake?
Byline: Roy Gutman, Christopher Dickey and Sami Yousafzai Deep in the treacherous mountains along the Afghanistan-Pakistan border, villagers remember the five Kuwaitis who showed up on Dec. 16. The men were hardly the first Arabs to come scrambling...
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Holding Courts in Contempt: To Stop Bush from Robbing Them of Power, Especially in the War on Terror, Judges Need to Win Public Support. the Pledge Wasn't a Good Start
Byline: Stuart Taylor Jr. The federal court decision declaring the "under God" phrase in the Pledge of Allegiance unconstitutional caused an uproar. But it may also provide a window into a larger contempt for the judiciary that seems to be taking...
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Kids, Are We Having Fun Yet? How to Make Sure Your Family Vacation Is Enjoyable
Byline: -KATHERINE STROUP We don't need a "National Lampoon" marathon to know family vacations can be rough. But pack three generations into a beach bungalow, and the results can be cataclysmic. Grandparents nag and smother. Grown children suddenly...
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Mail Call: Hope for a Healthier Future
Promising Strides in Technology and Medicine Our June 24 Special Report, "Fixing Your Brain," prompted many readers to hail the merits of new medical technology. One thanked us for making "all the galloping information and advances in medicine readily...
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More 'Ridiculousness': As If Questions about Insider Trading Weren't Enough, Now Martha Stewart Faces Inquiries about a Cover-Up
Byline: Keith Naughton Wielding a big knife and a look of determination, Martha Stewart kept her head down while chopping cabbage on CBS's "The Early Show" last week. But even in her weekly cooking segment, Martha couldn't escape the insider-trading...
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Mr. Nowhere Man: Bush Calls for Arafat's Ouster-And Gives Him a Needed Boost
Byline: Joshua Hammer Abbas Zaki once considered himself a true believer in Yasir Arafat. As a charter member of Arafat's Fatah movement, Zaki, 60, carried out bloody raids inside Israel from guerrilla bases in Jordan after the Six Day War, then...
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Newsmakers
Byline: Peg Tyre Rosie, O! The Queen Of Nice Gets Mean After signing off on her talk show on May 22, Rosie O'Donnell seems hellbent on banishing her title as the Queen of Nice. She just delivered a scathing stand-up comedy performance in which...
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No, You're Not to Blame: How to Invest with Less Risk
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn I'm impatient with critics who blame small investors for being "too greedy" during the bubble, as if you deserved the drubbing you took. There are some things the average American can't be expected to understand--among...
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One Nation under Judges: Do Judges Have Too Much Power?
Byline: George F. Will Last week was replete with reminders that there was something to be said for the Ninth Circuit Court's ruling that there is something wrong with the Pledge of Allegiance's assertion that this is "one nation under God." But...
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One Nation, Under. Who? Flying the Flag: On the Eve of the Fourth, a Ruling Barring 'Under God' from the Pledge Ignites a Furor-And Reminds Us What Freedom's About
Byline: Howard Fineman Telecoms are dying, consumers are wary and no one buys the corporate books. The deficit is exploding, the Middle East is a shambles and Al Qaeda still lives. But the U.S. Senate had more urgent business last Thursday: to stand...
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Perspectives
"No water, and it hurts." Johnny Endfield, vice chairman of the White Mountain Apache, on the battle against the Chediski fire in Arizona, which has ravaged his tribe's reservation "My heart was bumping." Nikoloz Tskitishvili, seven-foot 19-year-old...
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Praying for Rain: The Hot Zone Spread to Arizona-Where Firefighters Struggled to Control an Inferno, Families Clung to Hope and the Feds Pondered What Went Wrong
Byline: Randy Collier and T. Trent Gegax To see what was left of her Arizona hometown, Cher Hazen boarded a Red Cross bus that rolled into tiny Palmdale. As she peered through a window, Hazen looked upon a nightmare of ash. On the spot where her...
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The Editor's Note: We Devote Our Cover Story This Week to Examining How Our Unique Concept of Freedom Is Holding Up after September 11
Byline: Mark Whitaker A trip to London last week has reminded me, yet again, of how unique America is. When I went to graduate school in Britain in the late '70s, it was a society stultified by class divisions and prejudices. After a generation...
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The Plot Thickens: The Elizabeth Smart Case Heats Up as Police Probe a Handyman with a Rap Sheet and Ties to the Family
Byline: Kevin Peraino The two neighborhoods couldn't be more different. Almost four weeks after 14-year-old Elizabeth Smart was kidnapped from her home in the wealthy foothills of Salt Lake City, the spotlight had shifted across town to a modest...
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Traveling Sharks: There's More to the Seashore Than Sand, Sun and Surf-There's Science All around You. Here Are Six Puzzles to Ponder
Byline: Fred Guterl The huge shark in "Jaws" liked to hang around Martha's Vineyard. But it turns out that great whites prefer to roam. Marine biologist Peter Pyle attached electronic tags to four great whites off the coast of northern California...
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What Andy Saw: Warhol Wasn't Just the Godfather of Pop. He Was a Clairvoyant Whose Ideas on Celebrity, Cinema and Even Supersizing Made Him the Most Influential Artist since Picasso
Byline: Peter Plagens Great artists make the familiar seem astonishing. Really great artists turn around and make the astonishing seem familiar again. In the big, 250-work retrospective at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles (up through...
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WorldCom's Wrong Numbers: A Simple Math Trick May End Up Dwarfing the Enron Scandal, and the Fallout Is Only Beginning to Spread
Byline: Allan Sloan Two of America's favorite financial fantasies came to an end last week. "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire," once the hottest show on television because it let us all dream about becoming rich overnight, went off the air after its...
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You Can Call Me the Silver-Tongued Frog: Tired of Being Teased, I Got Involved, Got Some Confidence and Earned a Nickname I'm Proud Of
Byline: Jason Shen I can't remember the first time the bullies called me Kermit. Or Froggy. Or Toad. It has become such an integral part of me that I can't imagine myself without the nicknames. It's not easy being ugly. OK, not ugly. That's too...
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