Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 24

11.22.63: What Was Lost: JFK Made Us Realize America Was Still a Young Country. the Legendary Ben Bradlee Reflects on John F. Kennedy and What His Death Did to a Nation
Byline: Benjamin C. Bradlee I was in the Brentano's bookstore in the old Washington Press Club building around lunchtime on Nov. 22, 1963, when I heard the whispering. The president had been shot in Dallas. I was NEWSWEEK's Washington bureau chief...
Read preview Overview
2004: Wishful Thinking? the Latest Hillary Scenario
Byline: Howard Fineman Some dreams never die, including one clung to by loyal Clintonistas: that Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton will be the Democrats' presidential nominee next year. Is there a chance she would get into the race? "That depends on what...
Read preview Overview
About-Face in Iraq: A Stepped-Up Bombing Campaign. A Speedier Plan for Handing off Power. as the Body Count Mounts, Team Bush Tries a New Tack
Byline: Michael Hirsh, Rod Nordland and Mark Hosenball Paul Bremer's job sounds straightforward, at least. It is to transform Iraq from a dangerous muddle into a democratic model. But last week the dapper career diplomat got a faceful of Iraqi democracy,...
Read preview Overview
A Ceasefire: 'The First Step': Ahmed Qurei Wants Peace Talks with Ariel Sharon, and Also American Backing
Byline: Lally Weymouth New Palestinian Prime Minister Ahmed Qurei, better known as Abu Ala, appears to have lost out in a power struggle with Palestinian president Yasir Arafat. Last week Arafat managed to consolidate control of the Palestinian...
Read preview Overview
After the Funeral, the Vultures Descended: Without a Will, My Family Couldn't Stop the Greedy Friends and Relatives Who Ravaged My Father's Estate
Byline: Victoria Fann Death and money do strange things to people. Shakespeare wrote "He that dies pays all debts." In a perfect world, children are repaid for the neglects of the father, wives are compensated for any wrongful acts, friends are...
Read preview Overview
Aiming for 'Wide Consensus': Sharon Says Only He-Not the Israeli Left-Can Negotiate a Lasting Peace Deal
Byline: Lally Weymouth After three years of giving Prime Minister Ariel Sharon a free hand to pursue Palestinian terrorists, the Israeli public appears to be yearning for a sign that peace talks might once again get started. Even the battle-hardened...
Read preview Overview
Al Amarah Blues: The Tribulations of One Iraqi City's Police Force Show How Hard the Return to Local Authority Can Be
Byline: Joshua Hammer At 8 o'clock on a sultry Ramadan evening, a Toyota pickup full of ragtag gunmen lumbers beside the Tigris River in the southern Iraqi town of Al Amarah. They brandish aging AK-47s--some looted from Saddam Hussein's old armories,...
Read preview Overview
Archeology: Unearthing Egypt's God of, er, 'Fertility'
Byline: Jerry Adler He is politely called the god of "fertility," but the Egyptian deity Min had a lot more on his mind than agriculture. Invariably depicted with a large, erect penis, he was the god Pharaoh would pray to when he needed Egyptian...
Read preview Overview
Case of the Missing Head: He Chopped Up His Neighbor, and Dropped the Body in the Bay. but Robert Durst Was Acquitted. His Family's Not Happy
Byline: Anne Belli Gesalman and Dirk Johnson On the streets of Galveston, the mysterious drifter--seemingly a mute woman--was known as Dorothy Ciner. But under the ill-fitting wig, in reality, was Robert Durst, a fabulously rich New York real-estate...
Read preview Overview
Does the Kid Know How to Rock? the Artist Formerly Known as Bob Ritchie Spars with NEWSWEEK's Lorraine Ali
Publisher correction: Tuesday, December 02, 2003 The Kid Rock interview ("Does the Kid Know How to Rock?" Nov. 24) erroneously referred to the "Dodge 'Like a Rock' jingle." The slogan is actually Chevrolet's. ________________________ Byline: Lorraine...
Read preview Overview
Guiding Actors through Hell and Back
Byline: Devin Gordon Mexican filmmaker Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu is more articulate in his second language, English, than most people are in their first, but it's easy to make his fluency vanish. Just ask him which movie features the better Sean...
Read preview Overview
He's Still Having Fun: Bill Gates, for One, Thinks That the Digital Era Is Far from Fading. in Fact, He Thinks It's Only Now Getting Interesting
Byline: Steven Levy In a draft of an upcoming white paper, Bill Gates acknowledges that "computing today is at a crossroads." But he's got no doubt about the ultimate destination: more innovation, with his own company leading the way, of course....
Read preview Overview
Holes in the Heart: Penn, Watts, del Toro Weigh in with '21 Grams'
Byline: David Ansen Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu's powerful debut film, "Amores Perros," left little doubt about the man's ferocious talent, and his first film in English, the equally intense "21 Grams," certainly confirms it. Like the three-part...
Read preview Overview
Is Labor Dying, or Being Born? President Bush's Reward-the-Rich Ethos Is Creating Class Consciousness among Working People for the First Time in Years
Byline: Jonathan Alter There's this guy you should know. His name is Andy Stern and he runs the largest and fastest-growing labor union in the United States. If this were 25 or 50 or 100 years ago, you would surely recognize a labor chieftain like...
Read preview Overview
Is the 'Poodle' a Doberman? Blair Is Loyal, but Also Has Tough Views of His Own
Byline: Stryker McGuire I have now seen some of the [intelligence] stuff on [Iraq]. It really is pretty scary. [Saddam Hussein] is very close to some appalling weapons of mass destruction. I don't understand why the French and others don't understand...
Read preview Overview
Job One: Solve the Sunni Problem: The Political Problem the United States Faces Is Simple: A Significant Element of Iraqi Society Fears That It Will Do Badly in the New Iraq
Byline: Fareed Zakaria The only thing Arabs understand is force: this is the central dictum that has governed the Bush administration's foreign policy in the Middle East, an old line peddled by traditionalist scholars of the region. But it seems...
Read preview Overview
Keeping Up with Wi-Fi: If You Don't Already Have Wireless Internet Access in Your House, You Likely Will Soon. Should You Buy Now or Later?
Byline: Jason McLure and Jamie Reno During baseball season, the air at minor-league Raley Field in Sacramento, Calif., is filled with more than fly balls, cheers and the faint aroma of hot dogs and sauerkraut. Streams of data also pervade the stadium,...
Read preview Overview
Mutual Funds' Greed Machine: Some Skimming Is Legal but Unethical, and Some Is Flat-Out Illegal. Fund Companies Have Allowed Both, Making Their Rich Managers Richer Yet
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn One thing you can count on: when you invest, a lot of the people you trust are going to cheat. Billions of investor dollars whirl through the system. It's all too easy for insiders to stick their hands into that current...
Read preview Overview
Newsmakers
Byline: Sean Smith, Marc Peyser They Had To Be in Pictures Under normal circumstances, you don't want a porn king buying up naked pictures of you and your pals. But Paris Hilton must be wishing Hustler publisher Larry Flynt had done for her what...
Read preview Overview
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: Fox News, Deseret Morning News, New York Times, Atlanta Journal-Constitution (2), The Mirror, Boston Globe, CNN, Reuters, Toronto Star, Dateline "It is a test that we must and will win." Secretary...
Read preview Overview
Rising Up: Tupac Shakur Was Murdered in 1996. in a New Documentary, He Leaps off the Screen to Tell His Own Story, and Shows Why He's Never Really Gone Away
Byline: Allison Samuels "Please be patient with me," a frail-looking Afeni Shakur tells the crowd inside the Cinerama Dome on Sunset Boulevard. She's just flown in from her farm in North Carolina for the premiere of "Tupac: Resurrection," the documentary...
Read preview Overview
Soaking in Spam: The Net Is Buckling under the Weight of Billions of Unsolicited Bulk E-Mail Ads. Current Weapons Aren't Working-But There's Hope. A Report from the Front Lines
Byline: Brad Stone Scott Richter doesn't mind telling you how successful he is. His 28-employee company, OptInRealBig, clears $2 million in sales each month. He drives a Lexus convertible and a Lexus SUV, owns a half-million-dollar home outside...
Read preview Overview
Spy Games Uncloaked: A Great Military Historian Says Intelligence Is Oversold
Byline: Evan Thomas In the movie "Master and Commander," Jack Aubrey manages to find the single enemy ship for which he's searching the vast Pacific. During the real age of fighting sail, commanders were not so lucky. Lord Nelson, the cleverest...
Read preview Overview
The Dueling Nightmares: Nominating Howard Dean, a Fire-Breathing New England Liberal, Might Be Dangerous for Democrats but Less So Than Not Nominating Him
Byline: George F. Will Everyone who embarks on the pursuit of a party's presidential nomination must, as in John Milton's gloomy words, "scorn delights, and live laborious days." By last week, all the Democratic candidates except Howard Dean must...
Read preview Overview
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker Bill Gates "looked about 16 when I first met him," remembers our technology expert Steven Levy. It was early 1983, and Steven was working on his book "Hackers." A year later, Steven showed up in Seattle and spent a relaxed...
Read preview Overview
Travel: Splendor in the Trees
Byline: Paul Tolme Racing through fresh powder at Colorado's Steamboat resort, snowboarder Julie Paller weaved through the forest, dodging trees left and right. The run was untouched, and all she could hear was her board brushing against the snow....
Read preview Overview
Twilight of the PC Era? Some Commentators Are Proclaiming the End of the Computer World's Glory Days. but More Chip Power and Connectivity Might Produce the Biggest Changes Yet
Byline: Steven Levy Nicholas Carr seems an unlikely candidate for the technology world's Public Enemy No. 1. A mild-mannered 44-year-old magazine editor and freelance writer, he's spent five years laboring for the Harvard Business Review, not exactly...
Read preview Overview