Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 12

Al Qaeda: A Link to London?
Byline: Mark Hosenball American and British investigators say a new video featuring a July 7 London subway bomber and Qaeda chief deputy Ayman al-Zawahiri is authentic. These counterterror officials, who asked not to be named because of the sensitive...
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An Unexpected Reprieve; Thanks to New Treatments, People with Cystic Fibrosis Now Have Adulthoods They Could Never Have Imagined
Byline: Ben Whitford When 6-month-old Tiffany was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis in 1972, her doctor warned her mother not to let her play with dolls. The girl would die before her 5th birthday, he said; why stir up maternal instincts she could...
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Ask the Pro; Fadi Baradihi, President of the Institute for Divorce Financial Analysts
Byline: Linda Stern You might need more than a lawyer and handholding buddies when divorce threatens. The new go-to guy is a financial expert who can find hidden bank accounts and split them fairly. TIP SHEET's Linda Stern asked Baradihi for advice....
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CEO'S: A Downside to Being an Insider
Byline: Daniel McGinn It's been a hectic year for America's chief executives. In the first seven months of 2005, 777 CEOs left their jobs, according to Challenger, Gray & Christmas. That's 90 percent ahead of 2004's pace. To replace them, boards...
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Critical Condition; the Health Crisis: Contaminated Water. Dysfunctional Hospitals. the City's Medical Challenge Is Just Beginning
Byline: Sarah Childress (With T. Trent Gegax) It's the people Gary Peters couldn't save who haunt him. An emergency medical technician from northern Louisiana, Peters spent last week evacuating scores of patients from New Orleans's flooded hospitals,...
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Google to Microsoft: Watch Your Desktop
Byline: Steven Levy If Bill Gates ever had reason to doubt that the brash young billionaires of Google were out to get him, the time for such uncertainty is now officially over. Last month's dramatically revised version of its program Google Desktop...
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Hitting the Economy; the Fallout: The Hurricane's Shock Waves Are Already Hurting at the Gas Pump. but the Ultimate Price Tag Depends on How Fast America's Energy Hub Can Recover
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson We're getting a painful lesson in economic geography. What Wall Street is to money, or Hollywood is to entertainment, the Gulf Coast is to energy. It's a vast assemblage of refineries, production platforms, storage tanks...
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Hope in the Ruins; 'Battered but Proud': A New Orleans Partisan on the Spirit of Her Hometown-And Why It Will Endure
Byline: Julia Reed In 1719, a year after Jean-Baptiste le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville, established New Orleans as the capital of the fledgling French colony of Louisiana, a hurricane wiped out the handful of palmetto huts that comprised the city....
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How to Save the Big Easy
Byline: Jonathan Alter Cities are not forever. They are delicate organisms that require a proper balance of nutrients. You don't have to be Percy Shelley to know that history is littered with the debris of dead cities, though Pompeii is one of the...
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John G. Roberts: What Answers Is He Going to Give?
Byline: Debra Rosenberg, Stuart Taylor Jr. and Daniel Klaidman In 39 arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court, John G. Roberts earned a reputation as an unflappable advocate for his clients. But this week, when Roberts testifies before the Senate...
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Leviathan in Louisiana
Byline: George Will Americans tend to believe in God and to disbelieve in government. Time will tell how many are moved to rethink one or both of those tendencies in the aftermath of Katrina. It is, however, likely that the storm's lingering reverberations...
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Money Guide: A Cash Course for Kids
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn (Reporter associate: Temma Ehrenfeld) How to teach kids about money... hmm, that ought to be easy. In just a week, I piled up a stack of tools: cute piggy banks, kiddie debit cards, advice books, money DVDs and interactive...
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Newsmakers
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh, Marc Peyser Careers on Thin Ice You've seen them dance and diet, but the most delicious has-been reality show is yet to come. Fox's "Skating With Celebrities" is in production right now, and the network hopes it will air...
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Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom, Left To Right: The Washington Post (2), Los Angeles Times, USA Today, Los Angeles Times, AP, New York Times, Detroit Free Press (2) "We were so grateful. And now we are in hell." Rochelle Montrel,...
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Retirement: When It's Time to Cash In
Byline: Linda Stern Every week for the next 18 years, some 88,500 baby boomers will turn 59-1/2 and become eligible to pull money out of their retirement accounts without penalty. Whoo-hoo! Time to parrrr-tay! Um, not so fast. Happily, many boomers...
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Some Lessons from the Assembly Line; Sweating Away My Summers as a Factory Worker Makes Me More Than Happy to Hit the Books
Byline: Andrew Braaksma (Braaksma, a junior at the University of Michigan, wrote the winning essay in our "Back To School" contest.) Last June, as I stood behind the bright orange guard door of the machine, listening to the crackling hiss of the...
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Steely Man; It's Taken Warner Bros. 11 Years to Get 'Superman Returns' off the Ground. Not Exactly Faster Than a Speeding Bullet. Now 'X-Men' Director Bryan Singer's at the Helm in Australia. an Exclusive Visit
Byline: Sean Smith Surely they're not going to kill Superman. Inside a soundstage in Sydney, Australia, Brandon Routh, as the Man of Steel, crawls across a black, wet wasteland, pursued by the evil Lex Luthor (Kevin Spacey) and Luthor's three henchmen....
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The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham For Catharine Skipp, the moment with the baby was one of the worst. Catharine, a Miami-based reporter of ours who spent last week in New Orleans, was watching a bus fill with refugees. A woman carrying an infant had handed the...
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The Grill Next Door; Folksy Rachael Ray Whips Up Love-And Loathing
Byline: Marc Peyser Rachael Ray would like everyone invited to her wedding this month to know that it's OK to dress casually. "You can come in blue jeans if you want," says Ray, who's tying the knot in an Italian castle. "I'm going to wear a dress...
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The Lost City; What Went Wrong: Devastating a Swath of the South, Katrina Plunged New Orleans into Agony. the Story of a Storm-And a Disastrously Slow Rescue
***** CORRECTION: Editor's Note: The original version of this report incorrectly stated that Air Force One flew over the disaster area on Tuesday. In fact, President Bush first saw the scene on Wednesday, Aug. 31.In "The Lost City" (Sept. 12), we...
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They Did It Their Way; A Band So Contrary That It Rebelled against Rebellion
Byline: Lorraine Ali They're named after Marlon Brando's roustabout gang in "The Wild One," and their new record, "Howl," takes its title from the indelible Allen Ginsberg poem. Their hair is a mess and they look as if their jeans and wrinkled shirts...
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'This Is A National Disgrace'; A Civil-Rights Leader Mourns an African-American Population Left Behind
Byline: John Lewis (LEWIS is the U.S. congressman from the Fifth District of Georgia.) I was headed to New Orleans as a Freedom Rider in May of 1961. It would've been my first visit, but we were arrested in Jackson, Miss., and never made it. In...
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Transition: Hail to the Chief; He Helped Pull the Court to the Right in a Fractious Age. the Life, Times and Legacy of a Supreme Presence
Byline: Evan Thomas and Stuart Taylor Jr. (With Debra Rosenberg and Daniel Klaidman) His voice was distorted and strained by thyroid cancer and a tracheotomy, and inside the packed courtroom that day in June, there was a sense of unease. Deciding...
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Yet Another Gulf War; Up against It: Buffeted by Iraq, Gas Prices and the Fury over His Response to Katrina, Bush Faces a New Storm of His Own
Byline: Richard Wolffe (With Holly Bailey and Eleanor Clift) The members of the world's most exclusive club gathered in the Oval Office in a state of disbelief. Between them, they could draw on decades of experience of hurricanes and floods, at...
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