Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 19

A Journalist's Hard Fall: The New York Times Confronts an Embarrassing Trail of Deceit-And Difficult Questions about Its Own Culture
Byline: Seth Mnookin On Sunday, the front page of The New York Times featured a uniquely embarrassing article: Times reporter who resigned leaves a long trail of deception. The internal report took up four full pages of some of the most valuable...
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Design's Hip Diva Hits America's Heartland: This Month in Cincinnati, Radical Architect Zaha Hadid Demonstrates the Fine Art of Breaking the Rules
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan Zaha Hadid has waited a long time for her moment. Twenty years ago the Baghdad-born, London-based architect won a competition for a fancy Hong Kong club: her amazing design, a "horizontal skyscraper," called for four huge...
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Fibromyalgia: Not All in Your Head: Thanks to Brain-Scan Technology, This 'Imaginary' Ailment of 6 Million People Is Proving to Be Very Real
Byline: Anne Underwood For years, Lynne Matallana couldn't wear jewelry. The pressure of a necklace or watch against her skin burned "like a blowtorch." Lying in bed under cotton sheets was agonizing. Friendly handshakes sent pain shooting up her...
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Girl Fight: Savagery in the Chicago Suburbs: A Teen Ritual Spins out of Control. Who Will Pay?
Byline: Susannah Meadows and Dirk Johnson Tracey figured she was tough enough for a little hazing. It was a tradition of the "powder puff" football game for girls at upscale Glenbrook North High School outside Chicago. Maybe the seniors would put...
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I'm Not Married, but I'm Far from Alone: When Crisis Hit and My Friends Swooped in, They Deepened My Healing in Ways I Never Expected
Byline: Rachel Harris Last year the worst thing happened to me--a divorced, 55-year-old woman who is without living parents and has only one estranged brother, distant cousins and a 19-year-old daughter who was away at college. I had a medical crisis....
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'It's Good Saddam Is Gone': Assad Talks about Iraq, Israel and Weapons of Mass Destruction
Byline: Lally Weymouth Syria's young president, Bashar Assad, faces some tough choices. Recently, Secretary of State Colin Powell told Assad that the United States wants Syria to stop Palestinian rejectionist groups from operating freely in Damascus,...
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Locked and 'Reloaded': At Last, the 'Matrix' Sequel. Does Version 2.0 Deliver?
Byline: David Ansen In the four years since "The Matrix" appeared, the Wachowski brothers' dark, dystopian vision has entered the culture like a computer virus, endlessly replicating itself. But no matter how often it's been ripped off, parodied...
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Mail Call
Readers commended our coverage of the SARS virus in our May 5 cover story. "You are consistently ahead of the curve," one said. "Your article went into detail and did not gloss over the complex issues," observed another. "This is not just a 'hot news...
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Medical Testing at Home: They're No Substitute for Regular Doctor Visits, but Store-Bought Kits to Measure Things like Allergies and HIV Can Make It Easier to Get a Diagnosis and Encourage More Frequent Checks
Byline: Mary Carmichael Getting a medical self-diagnosis at home isn't exactly new--it began with the scale in ancient Egypt. But these days, you can check a lot more than your weight. Devices on the market and in the pipeline allow patients to...
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Murder at the Mosque: Why Was America's Favorite Iraqi Cleric Killed? the Inside Story of a CIA Connection, an Iranian Mystery and a Stash of Dollars Hidden in the Holy Man's Robes
Byline: Joshua Hammer The headquarters of muqtada al-Sadr lies in the market district of Najaf, a decrepit quarter of muddy alleys and dank shops in the shadow of the Shrine of Imam Ali. Black-turbaned bodyguards carrying pistols block the doorway,...
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Newsmakers: Michael Jordan: Don't Slam the Door on Your Way Out
Byline: Allison Samuels Just last month, when Michael Jordan walked off the court forever, Washington Wizards owner Abe Pollin paid him the usual greatest-player-ever tribute. But last week he told Jordan he wasn't welcome back as president of basketball...
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Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: Associated Press, New York Times, Philadelphia Daily News, Associated Press, BBC, The Hill, WNDU, CNN, New York Times, Reuters, The Advertiser, L.A. Times "On the smoking gun, I don't know." U.S....
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Say Farewell to Pin Curls: There Was a Sad Point to All That Sectioning and Spraying My Mother Did. She Was Trying to Ease Me, from the Head Down, into a Life of Masquerade
Byline: Anna Quindlen This balmy stretch from Easter until the end of school in June always reminds me of my mother messing around with my hair. Too often the kitchen smelled like the wallpaper was being chemically removed because of the fumes from...
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Seeing Is Believing: Hope for the Blind: New Treatments, Microchips and Electronic Implants Show Promise for Millions with Impaired Vision
Byline: Brad Stone Paul Ladis can't see his three daughters or his wife of 15 years, Beth. The former machinist from Roselle, Ill., has been legally blind for a decade. He was born with a hereditary disease called retinitis pigmentosa, a gradual...
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Shadow Man: He's the Media Mogul You've Never Heard of. How Gordon Crawford Charms-And Sways-The Big Guys
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts Long before it merged with America Online, Time Warner began holding its annual shareholder meetings at Harlem's Apollo Theater. But for the gathering this Friday, the company chose the Lans-downe Resort in Virginia, near...
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Small Patients, Big Pain: Ten Million American Children Suffer Chronic or Recurrent Pain. Treating Them Poses Special Challenges. Now Doctors and Researchers Are Learning How to Help
Byline: Karen Springen At 9, Alyssa Ayala lives with constant pain, the result of a ruptured appendix four years ago. Nearly every day she suffers intense aches radiating from a three-quarter-inch-wide scar that runs from her bellybutton to her...
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Spinning a New Web: The Democratic Machine Wants to Anoint an Early King. Can a High-Tech Insurgent Hack His Way In?
Byline: Howard Fineman No one contacted heather Allison to invite her to the campaign event at the Essex bar in Manhattan. She invited herself, and was there last week, pale ale in hand. "I found out about this surfing the Web," said Allison, 25,...
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Taking a New Look at Pain: Why Do We Hurt? Scientists Are Gaining Bold New Insights into the Nature and Dynamics of Pain-And They're Racing to Develop Stronger, Safer Treatments. Here's What the Future May Hold
Byline: Claudia Kalb There are moments in medical history when science morphs into magic. Few are as vivid as Oct. 16, 1846, the day Gilbert Abbott, a Boston printer, walked into Massachusetts General Hospital, lay down on a surgical table and,...
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That Joke Is a Killer
Byline: Rod Nordland Saddam Hussein, Taha Yassin Ramadan and Tariq Aziz are lounging on the balcony of one of Saddam's palaces when a flock of geese flies over. "Ramadan, shoot the geese," Saddam says. The vice president lifts his AK-47 and empties...
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The Bogeyman of Deflation: Inflation Looks Defeated, and Now Prices Could Start to Fall. That's Good, to a Point. but Deflation May Pose Real Dangers to the Economy
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson [T]he probability of an unwelcome substantial fall in inflation, though minor, exceeds that of a pickup in inflation from its already low level. --STATEMENT OF THE FEDERAL OPEN MARKET COMMITTEE (FOMC), MAY 6, 2003 ...
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The Dearly Departing: A Raft of Shows-Many Cheesy, All Beloved-Are Going off the Air. Fans Wail. Networks Weep
Byline: Devin Gordon At the official "Dawson's Creek" chat room on the Web, under a string of posts titled "get a clue people, pacey is WAY better for joey," the gloves are coming off. After six achingly expressive seasons, the WB's teen soap will...
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The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker For the past four months, my 12-year-old son has been sick with a nasty combination of mononucleosis and migraine headaches. As a result, our family has become all too familiar with the effects and treatment of chronic pain....
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The Waiting Game
Byline: Eleanor Clift It has been two years since President George W. Bush nominated Miguel Estrada and Priscilla Owen for federal judgeships. Senate Democrats have filibustered their nominations, and are set to draw out that of a third candidate,...
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Tommy Franks: He's an Unlikely Revolutionary, a Ground-Pounding Grunt's General. but in an Exclusive Interview, He Reveals How He Learned to Play by Rummy's Rules and Put a Whole New Way of War to the Test
Byline: Evan Thomas and Martha Brant Military commanders have long touted boldness and surprise as keys to victory. "L'audace, l'audace," said Napoleon, "toujours l'audace!" But how do you achieve surprise in the age of instant information? All...
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Travel: Gold in Those Hills
Byline: Tara Weingarten James Marshall was overseeing the construction of a sawmill on a cold, clear Coloma morning in January 1848 when the glint of something--the shape of a pea and about half the size--caught his eye. "I reached my hand down...
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'Where Doesn't It Hurt?': Human Pain Has Physiological Roots, but Also Spiritual, Cultural and Emotional Ones. the Author of 'How We Die' Muses on Its Nearly Poetic Complexity
Byline: Sherwin Nuland, M.D. The first patient assigned to me as a medical student learning orthopedics half a century ago was an elderly immigrant woman, about whom the harried resident had told me simply that her chief complaint was "pain all...
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WMDs for the Taking? While U.S. Troops Pushed on to Baghdad, Iraqis Were Looting Radioactive Materials from Once Protected Sites
Byline: Rod Nordland From the very start, one of the top U.S. priorities in Iraq has been the search for weapons of mass destruction. Weren't WMDs supposed to be what the war was about? Even so, no one has yet produced conclusive evidence that Iraq...
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