Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 31

A 'Forced Group Hug'; Bush's Charm Offensive on the Hill Collided with a New Republican Reality: Anxiety over the War Is Fraying the Base
Byline: Howard Fineman and Tamara Lipper As David Hobbes saw it, Republicans in Congress needed cheering up and a call to unity. The news had been a cavalcade of Mesopotamian gloom, clouding the popularity of their leader, George W. Bush, and his...
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Casting the First Stone; It Is One Thing to Preach the Teachings of the Church, Quite Another to Use the Centerpiece of the Faith as a Tool to Influence the Ballot Box
Byline: Anna Quindlen It was nearly 25 years ago that Robert Drinan, a member of Congress and an outspoken Jesuit (a redundancy if there ever was one), so enraged the Vatican with his defense of abortion rights that an order came down from Rome...
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D-Day's Real Lessons; War Leadership Takes More Than Resolve and Rhetoric. What Bush Could Learn from Churchill and FDR about His Own Fight
Byline: Jon Meacham, With Tamara Lipper and Richard Wolffe In the first days of the Bush Restoration in 2001, Karl Rove, the new president's senior adviser and in-house history buff, was dining at the British Embassy in Washington with the then...
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Design: Wallpaper Gets Down
Byline: Anna Kuchment Knitting needles, brooches and swing skirts aren't the only vintage accessories making a comeback. At last week's International Contemporary Furniture Fair in New York--an annual showcase of high-end design for the home--a...
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Exclusive: Mysterious Fingerprint
Byline: Michael Isikoff, Andrew Murr, Eric Pape and Mike Elkin "I had nothing to do with the bombings in Madrid," a visibly relieved Brandon Mayfield announced outside the Portland, Ore., courthouse last Thursday. Earlier this month, federal agents...
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Florida: Eroding: Bush's Cuban Support
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores President George W. Bush may have to do without Republicans like Fernando Amandi. A Miami Cuban-American and retired corporate executive who voted for Bush in 2000, he has become disenchanted with the administration, particularly...
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Hot Wheels: Chrysler's 'Poor Man's Bentley'; Cars with Four Doors and No Four-Wheel Drive Make a Comeback
Byline: Keith Naughton Once Howard Sucher saw the audacious Chrysler 300 on the Internet, he had to have it. But the Chrysler dealer near his home in Boca Raton, Fla., told him he'd have to wait five months. So Sucher and his wife traveled 180 miles...
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How TLC Makes You Sick; Caring for Loved Ones Endangers Health, Research Says
Byline: Claudia Kalb, With Joan Raymond When she's not working as a naturalist leading tours through the Minnesota woods, Pat Rummenie takes care of her husband, Mike, 62, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's four years ago. She helps him get dressed,...
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'It Was Unintentional'; Israeli Defense Minister Shaul Mofaz Apologizes for Civilian Deaths in Gaza, and Explains Why Israel Must Eventually Leave
Byline: Lally Weymouth Israeli defense minister Shaul Mofaz has a large screen in his office where he watched real-time pictures of the fighting in southern Gaza last week. There the Israeli Army was engaged in a large operation to shut down tunnels...
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Lightning Strikes; the 'Harry Potter' Books Have Finally Gotten the Wondrous Movie They Deserve. 'The Prisoner of Azkaban' Boasts a Brand-New Director and a Bold New Vision
Byline: Sean Smith The first scene of "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban" removes any doubt that the famous child wizard is growing up fast. The camera glides toward a light pulsing in the night, then through an open bedroom window, where...
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Man's Best Friend Meets DNA Testing
Byline: Mary Carmichael The Pharaoh hound is a noble breed. Depicted on the walls of Egyptian tombs, it's thought to have been man's best friend for 2,000 years, even when dogs were more like wolves than the docile creatures we know today. There's...
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Memo to Kerry: Only Connect; Bush Was out Touting Health and Education Programs He Had, in Fact, Sharply Cut. but If Kerry Had a Sharp Rejoinder, It Was Hard to Hear
Byline: Jonathan Alter Are we still the leader of the free world?" my 14- year-old daughter asked last week at the breakfast table. Without knowing it, she had stated one of John Kerry's campaign themes much more succinctly than Kerry himself has...
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More Kids Major in Going Slow; Why Students All over the Country Are Taking So Long to Graduate from College
Byline: Pat Wingert Travis Quezon is a modern-day Renaissance man. During his seven years in college, most of them at the University of Hawaii, he has studied chemistry and oceanography, art history and sign language. A few years ago, he decided...
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More Miracles, Please; the First One Is That 'Mr. Credibility' Now Leads India
Byline: Sudip Mazumdar and Ron Moreau Probably no human being could do what's being asked of Manmohan Singh. The 72-year-old economist, widely known as "Mr. Credibility," took over last week as India's new prime minister. Now he's faced with the...
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Newsmakers; Neil Sedaka, "Joey" and TV's New Repeat Offenders
Byline: Lorraine Ali, Marc Peyser Neil Sedaka wrote some of the most indelible hits of the '60s and '70s --from "Calendar Girl" to "Love Will Keep Us Together." Now he's back on the charts thanks to American Idol Clay Aiken's covering his "Solitaire,"...
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Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom, left to right: Baltimore Sun, Associated Press, Telegraph, Reuters, Associated Press, Chicago Sun-Times, The Washington Post, Ananova, New York Daily News, Boston Globe, Reuters "He talked about 'time...
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Running on Dope; as a Champion Sprinter Admits She Used Forbidden Substances, a Widening Scandal Threatens the U.S. Olympic Track Team
Byline: Mark Starr It should have been the most glorious day of Kelli White's athletic career. The young American sprinter had completed her sport's most prized double, winning gold medals in both the 100 and 200 meters at the World Track and Field...
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The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker When Iraqi forces raided Ahmad Chalabi's headquarters in Baghdad last week, it may have been partly a result of Mark Hosenball 's scoops. In recent weeks, our investigative ace has reported on evidence that Chalabi misused...
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The End of the Road for 'Bonnie and Clyde'; They're Smart, Charming-And, It Seems, Bank Thieves
Byline: Dirk Johnson and Andrew Murr Handsome, blond and fairy-tale charming, Craig Pritchert, a onetime Arizona baseball star, strolled into a bank in the Colorado Rockies. His girlfriend, Nova Guthrie, a former sorority president and a pre-med...
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The Good, the Bad, the Ugly; Everywhere in the Arab World, People Are Talking about Reform. but the Easiest Way to Sideline a Reform Is to Claim That It's Pro-American
Byline: Fareed Zakaria, Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com. Traveling through the Middle East for the past week has been tough. Anger and frustration with America is worse than I've ever seen it. Still, I've been torn between two feelings,...
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The High Cost of Summer Cash; Teenagers Are Twice as Likely as Adults to Get Hurt on the Job
Byline: Julie Scelfo and Karen Springen Soon the final school bell will ring, and 4 million teenagers will start their summer jobs. Aaron Janssen is one of them. Janssen, 16, is psyched to have landed a stint as a cook near his home in Iowa; working...
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The Homecoming, and Then the Hard Part; How Do You Return to the 'Real World' When Only Other Soldiers Can Understand How You've Changed?
Byline: Anthony Swofford, Swofford is a veteran and a writer. In my mother's house there hangs a photo of the two of us taken days after my return from the 1991 gulf war. In the photo, we're both smiling and my mother is crying as I remove a yellow...
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The Rise and Fall of Chalabi: Bush's Mr. Wrong; Ahmad Chalabi May Go Down as One of the Great Con Men of History. but His Powerful American Friends Are on the Defensive Now, and Chalabi Himself Is under Attack
Byline: Evan Thomas and Mark Hosenball, With Michael Hirsh, Michael Isikoff and John Barry in Washington, Rod Nordland, Melinda Liu and Babak Dehghanpisheh in Baghdad, and Christopher Dickey in Paris For the hard-liners at the Defense Department,...
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The Wars through Arab Eyes; the 'Road to Jerusalem'-And Mideast Peace-Was Supposed to Lead through Baghdad. but Now Arabs See Two Occupations: One Israeli, One American
Byline: Joshua Hammer, Richard Wolffe and Christopher Dickey, With Dan Ephron in Rafah and Rod Nordland in Baghdad The images were searing, and strikingly similar. Last Wednesday afternoon, as a thousand unarmed Palestinian protesters marched toward...
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The World's Powerhouse; China Is the Largest Consumer of Steel, Tin and Copper-And the Second Largest of Oil. but What If Its Economy Is Caught in a Bubble?
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson The question about china's economy is no longer what it will do to China but what it will do to the rest of the world. It may invigorate the global economy--or destabilize it. We don't know. Until recently, China's movement...
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Trailblazer by Design; as GM's New Studio Boss, Ed Welburn Is Living His Boyhood Fantasy. but Can the Soft-Spoken Stylist Give the Stuffy Automaker a Makeover?
Byline: Keith Naughton Many fathers and sons bond over baseball. For Ed Welburn and his father, it was cars. Beginning when he was 2, Welburn and his dad would lie on the living-room floor of their Philadelphia home, scribbling away for hours. Dad,...
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