Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 9

A Date with History: As the Years Go by and the Pain-So Stark Now-Fades, How Will September 11 Rank in History? the Answer May Turn on What Comes Next. A NEWSWEEK Conversation with Some Leading American Historians
History, the Dutch scholar Pieter Geyl once said, is an argument without end, and the meaning of September 11 is now part of that ongoing conversation. To assess the significance of the day--and to be sure, it's very, very early--NEWSWEEK convened...
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After 9-11: A Year of Change: For Victims' Families, Rescue Workers and Survivors, Life Will Never Be the Same
Byline: Interviews conducted by Julie Scelfo, Suzanne Smalley, Debra Rosenberg and Adam Piore Christy Gibney Carey As the director of the Family Assistance Center, Carey was in charge of helping victims' families apply for aid and file missing-person...
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A War Yet to Be Won: It's Not Just Osama Bin Laden Who Remains at Large. So Do Most of the Key Qaeda Operatives Who Planned and Financed the September 11 Attacks
Byline: Mark Hosenball Flush with cash and sharply dressed, Abdul Majid didn't much look like an Islamist terrorist. In the mid-'90s, hanging out in Manila with his sidekick, Abdul Basit, Majid was regarded by the locals as a somewhat smarmy playboy...
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Bin Laden's Bad Bet: Al Qaeda Is Still a Danger. but the Appeal of Osama Bin Laden's Fundamentalist Ideology Is Fading, Even in the Arab World
Byline: Fareed Zakaria In one of his legendary moments of brilliance, Sherlock Holmes pointed the attention of the police to the curious behavior of a dog on the night of the murder. The baffled police inspector pointed out that the dog had been...
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Filling the Void: Clearing the Wreckage Was Just the Beginning. for Those Rebuilding Ground Zero, the Stakes Are High, and the Whole World Is Watching
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan One year after the terrorist attacks, the place where the Twin Towers once loomed looks like any big-city construction site. Swept clean of the last pieces of twisted steel, the 16 acres now thrum with the noise of bulldozers...
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Five Who Survived: When the Hijacked Planes Slammed into the World Trade Center, More Than 1,100 People Were Trapped by Wreckage and Fire on the Upper Floors. Fewer Than 20 Managed to Get out Alive. Here Are Their Stories
Byline: This story was reported by Suzanne Smalley, Julie Scelfo and Adam Piore. It was written by Jerry Adler. Up, or down? Kelly Reyher stood in the crowded 78th-floor elevator lobby of World Trade Center 2 and pondered whether to retrieve his...
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Going to High School near Ground Zero: The World Trade Center Was a Big Part of My Life. Now That It's Gone, Nothing Feels Certain
Byline: Inna Guzenfeld In a few days it will be the anniversary of September 11. Inevitably, some reporter will approach one of my fellow students at Stuyvesant High School and ask what it was like to have witnessed the events of that day. But the...
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One Day, Now Broken in Two
September 11 is my eldest child's birthday. When he drove cross-country this spring and got pulled over for pushing the pedal on a couple of stretches of monotonous highway, two cops in two different states said more or less the same thing as they...
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Periscope
Money Trail Freezing the Terrorist Cash Stashes Despite questions raised last week by the United Nations, Bush administration officials insist their worldwide campaign to eradicate financiers of terrorism has dramatically curbed Osama bin Laden's...
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Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: Christian Science Monitor, The Washington Post (2), AP, Palm Beach Post, New York Times (2), CNN, New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, Travel and Leisure Golf Magazine, ESPN.COM "I'll be sprinkling...
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Same as He Ever Was: The 9-11 Attacks Changed America, but They Only Solidified Bush's Core Qualities-Now on Display as He Ponders Iraq
Byline: Howard Fineman and Tamara Lipper George W. Bush and Dick Cheney had had enough. It was "time for a giant pushback," as one aide later put it. For weeks, eminent Republicans--led by alumni of the first Bush administration--had warned that...
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The Art of Honoring the Dead: Celebrated Artist Maya Lin Reflects on What Gives a Memorial the Lasting Power to Haunt Our Collective Memory
Byline: C.M. When Maya Lin was a 21-year-old Yale undergraduate, she beat out 1,420 other entrants in a blind competition to design the Vietnam Veterans Memorial--a design that changed forever the way we think about commemoration. Now based in New...
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The Brotherhood Now: A Best-Selling Author and Former Firefighter Writes of the Enduring Emotional Toll Suffered by Those Who Watched Helplessly as Comrades, Friends and Loved Ones Died Trying to Save Lives
Byline: Dennis Smith I have been going to the funerals of firefighters killed in the line of duty for almost four decades. I learned early that among "first responders," tears are as certain as eulogies. And even as the towers fell, as the steel...
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The Future of New York: Buoyed by Its New Mayor, Gotham Is Gamely Digging out from the Rubble of the Attacks. but beneath the Bravado, Is the City Any Safer?
Byline: Jonathan Alter and Geoffrey Gagnon It's not like Jerusalem or Tel Aviv. On most days, in most ways, New York City feels almost normal, as if it had all been a dream. Almost no one seems to fear sitting in an outdoor cafe or riding a bus....
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Their Faith and Fears: By Day, They Have Been Leaders and Heroes. by Night, They Have Fought Anxiety and an Incalculable Sense of Loss. This Is the Story of How a Widow, a General, a Key Bush Adviser and Pakistan's President Braved the Fires of September 11 and Endured Its Trying Aftermath
Byline: Evan Thomas Downstairs, in Lisa Beamer's spacious home in Cranbury, N.J., is a coat closet crammed with things she never wanted to own. Large plastic containers filled with thousands of letters and postcards from all over the world, some...
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'We Have Gotten through It': One Year Later, Rudy Giuliani Talks about 9-11 and Its Fallout
In the days after September 11, no one person embodied the pain, the turmoil and the determination of America more than Rudolph Giuliani. Rudy, who had been both revered and reviled during his two terms as mayor of the country's biggest city, was graceful,...
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