Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 18

$75 Million of Stuff: We Know What Happened to the Cash Donated to the Victims of 9-11. but What about the Boots, Dog Food, Prom Dresses and Teddy Bears?
Byline: David France Chris Ward is snaking through a tunnel of cardboard crates, past boxes marked cotton balls or peroxide or IV kits, past thousands of shampoo containers organized by size. Hangar 5, at JFK airport's Cargo Area D, which Ward supervises...
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A Conspiracy of Notebooks: The Reporter Did It: In Our National Blame Game, the Media Is the Perennial Contender
Byline: Anna Quindlen Linda Lay suffered from bad timing as well as bad judgment. Who thought it would be a good idea for the wife of the former chairman of Enron to poor-mouth before a national TV audience that probably included hundreds who had...
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At Least It's a Plan: The War Is Sacrosanct, the Tax Cut Untouchable. So What Is the Democratic Party to Do? the Opposition's Playbook
Byline: Howard Fineman The mood in the Capitol's LBJ Room was upbeat, and with good reason: the Senate's Democrats, meeting in private, were learning that they didn't have to attack President George W. Bush's popular $1.35 trillion, "not over my...
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At War with Ourselves: Racial Tensions on the Rise in a German Stalag
Byline: David Ansen While "Black Hawk Down" hangs on at the top of the box-office charts, the war movies keep coming. Soon we'll have Mel Gibson's Vietnam drama "We Were Soldiers." And now we get a POW drama, "Hart's War," set in a German stalag...
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Beijing's Latest Look: China Is Making Nice Ahead of a Bush Visit This Month. A Glimpse Behind the Charm Offensive
Byline: Melinda Liu Some Americans know Li Zhao-Xing, Beijing's former ambassador to Washington, for his stern lectures on Chinese sovereignty. But Li--now deputy foreign minister--has, in his own way, found religion. In Washington last week, before...
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Eve Ensler Uses the V Word: It Was One Thing for a Play about Women's Private Parts to Become a Hit. Can 'The Vagina Monologues' Sing the Body Electric on TV?
Byline: Marc Peyser Say what you will about "The Vagina Monologues," it is certainly truth in advertising. Vaginas. Monologues. No intermission. Which is why what happened one night in Boston last month was so surprising. After author Eve Ensler...
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Every Man for Himself: They Used to Be on Top of the World, but Now Enron's Fallen Elite Are Trying to Duck Blame for Their Empire's Ruin. How They May Try to Hang Together-Or Hang Separately
Byline: Evan Thomas Incredulity is a polite word to describe the reaction to former Enron CEO Jeff Skilling, who swore last week at a congressional hearing that his company's bookkeeping trickery had caught him by surprise. Rep. Ed Markey of Massachusetts...
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Flying the 'Big Bad Dog': Cape Town Is a Great Place to Push the Envelope
Byline: Tom Masland in Cape Town The control tower at Cape Town International Airport knows the black Electric Lightning fighter jet as Bravo Bravo Delta. That's an inside joke--its pilots call the British Mach 2 interceptor the Big Bad Dog. Designed...
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Giving Lessons in Love: Oklahoma Is Fighting Its Sky-High Divorce Rate with Controversial, State-Funded 'Marriage Ambassadors'
Byline: Peg Tyre On a cold afternoon about a week before Valentine's Day, Meichelle Jackson, 41, sits with 18 other students in a classroom in rural Caddo County, Okla., and listens to a lecturer discuss communication and conflict resolution in...
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How to Find Honest Stocks: To Avoid a Personal Enron, Get Any Skunks and Overhyped Companies out of Your Portfolio
Byline: Jane Bryant-Quinn It's time to ask yourself the same questions that Congress wants to ask former Enron chief Kenneth Lay: What do you really know about your stock? If the answer is "almost nothing"--um, how come? Your future depends on how...
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In the Shadow of the Throne: Britain's Princess Margaret, Dead at 71, Was the Diana of Her Day
Byline: Stryker McGuire in London A half century ago, everything looked promising to the vivacious 22-year-old Margaret Rose. The coronation of her sister, Elizabeth, on June 2, 1953, was "like a phoenix-time," she later said. "Everything was being...
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Jackson in the Driver's Seat: Country's Hottest Act Is Also an Iconoclast: His Album's at No. 1, but He Prefers to Play Grungy Punk Clubs
Byline: Lorraine Ali The singer takes the stage at New York's legendary punk club CBGB against a backdrop of graffitied walls and shredded fliers for obscure, long-gone bands. A tattooed, dreadlocked bouncer gets ready, folding his arms forebodingly...
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Kwan Song: At Her Last-Chance Olympics, a New, Tougher and More Focused Michelle Kwan Will Fight for Figure Skating's Most Treasured Prize
Byline: Mark Starr It's a winter night in Manhattan Beach, Calif., and Michelle Kwan is in the driver's seat. She's picked a sushi place for dinner and, though the restaurant is only a five-minute walk from your hotel, she insists on driving you...
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Lindh's Defensive Play: The American Taliban's Lawyers Target the Circumstances of His Confession as the Case against the Accused Terrorist Heats Up
Byline: Karen Breslau We've seen the videotape a thousand times: frail and filthy under a wild plume of hair, the wincing young captive is laid on a stretcher. Helping hands wrap him in a hospital smock. But there are no famous pictures of John...
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My Skeleton Saga: Screaming Speeds, Gut-Churning Turns, Your Face This Close to the Ice: The Winter Games' New Event Is the Ride of a Lifetime
Byline: Devin Gordon The warming hut at start one is a triumph of function over form. It is warm inside, and that's all. The chipped linoleum floor offers no reassurance about the ride ahead. The wooden benches are not comfortable. There's no Good...
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Newsmakers: Changes in 'The Producers,' Grisham Wants a Break, Hasty Pudding Scandal, and Britney's New Movie
Byline: David Gates, Malcolm Jones and John Horn Sprungtime for 'Producers' The vernal equinox doesn't come until March 20, but springtime for Nathan Lane begins three days early; on the 17th, he and costar Matthew Broderick finally get sprung...
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Periscope
Byline: Mark Hosenball; Julie Scelfo; Eleanor Clift; Adam Rogers; Mary Carmichael; Anne Underwood; Cathleen McGuigan; David Ansen; Malcolm Jones Al Qaeda Leaders Waiting in the Wings The hunt for Osama bin Laden and other top Qaeda and Taliban...
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Perspectives
"It's a chance for the world to see that in a time of war, we can come together in friendly competition. Let's roll." President George W. Bush, to members of Team USA before the opening ceremony of the XIX Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City ...
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Point Man in a War of Bloody Attrition: Israel's Controversial Chief of Staff Is Outspoken, Uncompromising, Politically Savvy-And Ambitious
Byline: Joshua Hammer It had been another brutal week in the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, and in his second-floor office at military headquarters in Tel Aviv, Gen. Shaul Mofaz was starting to show fatigue. Two nights earlier, a Hamas gunman from...
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Risks and Rewards: Despite the Ever-Present Threat of Violence, Tourism in Israel and Its Neighbors Can Be Rewarding and Even Relaxing. and Now It's Cheap
Byline: Joshua Hammer The Hizbullah guerrillas at the gates of the Temples of Baalbek looked surly. It was a balmy morning in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley, and as I approached the sprawling complex--among the finest Roman ruins in the world--a burly,...
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Science of Speed: Fast Ice, Fast Snow, Slinky Suits and Slippery Skis Shave Milliseconds That Can Separate the Winners from the Losers
Byline: Sharon Begley Ice rocks!" wrote one exuberant speed skater in the official logbook. "Ice is the dope s--t!" raved another. These were not the words of desperate drinkers euphoric about getting a decent Long Island iced tea in Salt Lake City....
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Showtime in Salt Lake: Amid Tight Security, Heartfelt Patriotism and a Record Television Audience, the Curtain Rises on the 19th Winter Games
Byline: Sharon Begley Never before has the host of a Winter Olympics simultaneously sent its sons and daughters to the games of war and the war of games. America, of course, is living through just that poignant juxtaposition. As the tattered American...
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The $24 Billion Cure: Readers on Bill and Melinda Gates, the Right to Die, Mammograms and Movie Masters
Thanks to Geoffrey Cowley for such a terrific article about the Gates Foundation's efforts ("Bill's Biggest Bet Yet," Health, Feb. 4). People like Melinda and Bill Gates, with their determination and compassion for our international neighbors, are...
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The Iran Connection: Washington Believes Tehran Is Developing Weapons of Mass Destruction-And Worries They Could Wind Up in the Hands of Lebanon's Hizbullah
Byline: Christopher Dickey This is where the Marines were," says Amin Sabah, 45, as he looks out across an empty parking lot near Beirut airport. The U.S. troops were in a building they thought was well protected that morning of Oct. 23, 1983. Sabah...
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The Plot to Get Pearl: The Main Suspect in the Pearl Kidnapping Was Born and Bred in London, Then Ran off to Join the Jihad
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores Ahmed Omar Sheikh seemed like a pleasant enough fellow. Neatly groomed and bespectacled, he approached American traveler Bela Nuss at a cafe in New Delhi, India, in October 1994. He was gregarious and inquisitive, was...
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The Ripple Effect: The Enron Scandal Is Making Us Rethink the Basic Rules of Corporate Life and Question the Greedy, Go-for-Broke Ethos of the Long Boom
Byline: Daniel McGinn Forgive Michael Useem if he sounds a bit gleeful when he talks about Enron. Where other observers see a tragic tale of executive avarice, Useem, a management professor at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, sees...
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The Surrealists' Sexy Side: The Metropolitan Museum Serves Up a Show about the Birds, the Bees and Some Very Weird Dolls
Byline: Peter Plagens A long time ago--say about 1924, when the surrealists formally organized in Paris--sex was still considered a mysterious and powerful undercurrent in polite society. Oh, sure, there were flappers rolling down their hose and...
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Travel Briefs
VOLCANOES Good, Hot, Stinky Fun If you're looking for a hot vacation spot, why not visit a grumbling, growling volcano? No longer the domain of science nerds, volcano vacations lure tourists who appreciate nature in the raw. "You could see steam,...
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What I Did Was Legal, but Was It Right? I Avoided the Draft by Taking a Student Deferment; What Haunts Me Is That Somebody Took My Place
Byline: James Dannenberg Funny how time and events can turn your world view upside down. Now that we are engaged in what most folks--me included--consider a "just war" in response to terrorist attacks, a war in which American men and women volunteer...
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Where Is Danielle Van Dam? Their Daughter Is Snatched, Asleep in Her Bed. the Town Is Rife with Talk That Their Lifestyle May Have Cost Them the Child. A Family's Nightmare
Byline: Jamie Reno and Ana Figueroa It's been 10 days since 7-year-old Danielle van Dam went missing. The blonde, blue-eyed Girl Scout was last seen on the night of Feb. 1, comfy in her blue-flowered pj's as her father tucked her into bed on the...
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