Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 131, No. 23, June 8

Clinton's Chinese Puzzle
New questions about links between technology, trade and cash are clouding the president's trip to Beijing RON BROWN ALWAYS knew how to make a deal. In August1994, the Commerce secretary traveled to China to promote American business. High on the agenda:...
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Hey, Look What I Found
The Hubble telescope snaps a picture of a planet near a distant star UNTIL NOW, ASTRONOMERS SEARCHing the skies for planets beyond our neighborhood nine have faced one glaring problem-literally: planets orbit so close to their star that, to an observer...
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'Kid Is out of Control'
His father knew things were going terribly wrong-but what to do? The family story behind young Kip Kinkel's alleged rampage in Oregon. IN THE LAST TELEPHONE call he made before he died, Bill Kinkel seemed to sense an approaching catastrophe. Hours earlier,...
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Lessons from the Front
PAT WINGERT How to prevent school shootings? Crack down at the hint of a threat-and then follow up, one kid at a time. KIP KINKEL WASN'T THE first. Though school-related killings have statistically fallen over the past five years, there have been a...
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Letters
One Step Closer? WHEN IT COMES TO PURPORTED BREAK-throughs in cancer research, many in the media tend to print only the hype; you rightly caution against too much optimism just yet ("The Hunt for a Cancer Cure," SOCIETY, May 18). While hope now has...
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Losing the Name Game
Kids, Can You Say Vaio? We asked several naming consultants for the best and worst names in high tech. They couldn't help adding comments. GOOD NAMES BAD NAMES PowerBook Apple's ...
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Main Street vs. the Mall: Part II, the Comeback
MICHAEL Mindel remembers the day his father, chairman of the fast-growing Italian-restaurant chain Il Fornaio, committed to opening an eatery in the wrong part of Pasadena, Calif "I thought my father was insane," he admits. It was 1992, and Pasadena...
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Marching into Battle
The Clintonites may be confident in public, but in private Starr is winning legal skirmishes as he tries to crack the walls around the Monica scandal THE WHITE HOUSE SPINNERS AND lawyers handling the Monica Lewinsky scandal have had every reason to...
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Nuclear Jitters
With KAREN BRESLAU in Washington, CARLA POWER in Islamabad. SUDIP MAZUMDAR in New Delhi, GREGORY BEALS at the United Nations and bureau reports Pakistan's desert detonations were a widely expected response to India's. Now the world must find a way to...
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Out of Pandora's Box
Pakistan's nuclear tests have put nonproliferation at risk. It's about time the rich world paid attention to the Productions of the Subcontinent. TO MAKE SENSE OF THE INEFFABLE MAN turns to myth. At dawn of July 16.1945. Robert Oppenheimer watched...
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Pakistan's Bomb Builder
Around the globe, the father of the country's nuclear-weapons program is considered armed and dangerous ABDEL QADEER KHAN IS a national hero in Pakistan: the Father of its Bomb. Like Robert Oppenheimer in the United States and Andrei Sakharov in the...
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Perspectives
"Yes, by the grace of God." Foreign Minister Gohar Ayub Khan, when asked if Pakistan had carried out additional nuclear tests on Saturday. Pakistan set off five test blasts last Thursday in response to India's detonations three weeks ago. "He'll be...
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RFK's Last Campaign
THOMAS, an assistant managing editor, is at work on a biography of Robert F. Kennedy. Thirty years after his assassination, how the tension and tumult of Robert Kennedy's final days -and his death- changed our politics LATE AT NIGHT, ROBERT F. KENNEDY...
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The Day the Jokes Stopped
With TARA WEINGARTEN, ANDREW MURR, CORIF BROWN, PAMELA LANSDEN and ANA FIGUEROA in Los Angeles and YAHLIN CHANG in New York Comedian Phil Hartman's wife apparently kills him at home and then turns the gun on herself PHIL HARTMAN WAS ALWAYS A master...
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The Feeling Isn't Mutual
SLOAN is NEWSWEEK'S Wall Street editor. His e-mail address is sloan@panix.com. Big insurers want to change how they're owned- some the right way, and some the other way MOST OF THE TIME, WATCHING MUtual-insurance companies is about as much fun as watching...
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The Founding Father
Remembering Barry Goldwater-the salty, straight-talking conservative icon who gave us the Gipper and the modern GOP BARRY GOLDWATER HAD TIME TO WASTE. IN THE DAYS leading up up to his speech to the 1964 Republican convention in San Francisco, the Arizona...
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The Great Pumpkins
Unlike their peers, Billy Corgan & Co. survived success. They're back with the moody 'Adore.' IS BILLY CORGAN THE Michael Jordan of pop music? Like his fellow Chicagoan, there seems to be nothing that the front man of The Smashing Pumpkins can't...
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The Keyboard Kids
Chatting on the Net is becoming the social activity of choice for techno-savvy early teens. AH, SUMMER. THOSE LAZY AFTERnoons with the hot sun streaming down, the gentle winds, the honeyed song of birds and the sound of children playing ... doors on...
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The Next Big Thing?
A small software company called Parable wants to simplify multimedia tools for the Web IN THE PAST FEW SURFING THE Web has become a commonplace activity. Unfortunately, making a personal Web site that's anywhere near as cool as those done by the experts...
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The Trouble with Bertha
If big clubs are banned, golfers will have strokes IT'S ONE OF GOLF'S MOST EN-during cliches: "Drive for show, putt for dough." It means that hitting 250-yard shots from the tee may feel great, but rounds are won by making short shots on the green....
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What If RFK Had Survived?
SCHLESINGER, historian and former special assistant to President Kennedy, is author of "Robert Kennedy and His Times." An end to Vietnam, no Watergate, a chance for liberalism-Kennedy's biographer on the might-have-beens. WHY DO AMERICANS RECALL ROBERT...
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What Really Ails Russia
Last week's financial panic had little to do with Asian flu THE ERA OF OFFICIAL HAPPY TALE about the "new Russia" ended last week. No more chirping from Western economists pleased as punch about how remarkable it is, just seven years after the collapse...
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Woman Warrior
CORIE BROWN AND LAURA SHAPIRO Disney's latest animated heroine is no Barbie doll. How Mulan changed from the dimwit star of a video to a feisty fighter on the big screen. WAY OFF IN THE DISTANCE, barely visible behind a snowy mountain range, a million...
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Woman Warrior
CORIE BROWN AND LAURA SHAPIRO Disney's latest animated heroine is no Barbie doll. How Mulan changed from the dimwit star of a video to a feisty fighter on the big screen. WAY OFF IN THE DISTANCE, barely visible behind a snowy mountain range, a million...
Read preview Overview