Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 9

'A Cloud Lifted': After Dodging a Breakup, Microsoft-Its Foes Say-Is Back to the Same Tactics That Got the Company in Trouble in the First Place
On an overcast afternoon last spring in his Redmond, Wash., office, Steve Ballmer stretched back at the end of another day as CEO of the world's biggest software company and considered a question: was this the best time in Microsoft's history? "In...
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A New Lord of the Rings: Behind the Race to Run the $1 Billion Olympics Empire
Most Americans pay no attention to the Olympics until the athletes are parading into the stadium for the Opening Ceremonies--and certainly not to the notoriously obscure politics of the International Olympic Committee. But when the IOC convenes in...
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A Noble Farewell for an American Soldier: I Was an Antiwar Protester; My Father Was a Veteran Loyal to the Military. I Think I Finally Understand Why
Two days after my father died, as the visiting hours at the funeral home ended and we were putting on our coats, there was one last visitor. He was a stooped, solitary man who walked slowly to the open coffin and gazed down at my father, lying in his...
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A Question of Life or Death: Untangling the Knottiest of Ethical Dilemmas
In any political debate burdened by strong ethical differences, the first casualty is usually language itself. So it is with the ethical issues surrounding stem-cell research--specifically the question of whether days-old human embryos should be destroyed...
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At Home Away: Hotels Are Adding Homes for Guests Who Want to Be Owners
Eloise had the right idea. A luxury hotel can be a grand place to live, and not just for impish little girls. These days so many people want to be permanent residents of five-star establishments that innkeepers from Bali to Key Biscayne, Fla., have...
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Battle for Bush's Soul: The President Is Trapped between Religion and Science over Stem Cells. Lives-And Votes-Are at Stake
If Karl Rove has his way, the GOP--the Grand Old Party--will become the POG--the Party of God. Since the early '70s, the actively religious have been migrating to the Republicans. In the 2000 election, two of three voters who regularly attended church...
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Car Phones: Dialing & Driving Don't Mix: New York Cracks Down on Motorists and Mobile Phones. Will the Coming Wireless Tech Help or Hurt?
Driving down Manhattan's Ninth Avenue last week, Ray Payano was hard at work. With a client talking to him on Payano's handheld mobile phone and his boss weighing in on the car's speakerphone, the 28-year-old computer consultant was in the middle of...
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Cellular Divide: Harvested from Embryos, Stem Cells May Cure Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and a Host of Other Diseases. but Now the Cells Are at the Heart of a War Pitting Pro-Life Purists against Research
They're not much to look at, really. To see the cells of a four-day human embryo, you stain them with a few drops of dye, slip them under a 20- to 40-magnification microscope and peer through the eyepiece. There they are: a hollow sphere of roundish...
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Cyberscope
HOT PROPERTY Now It's Your Turn to Build a 3-D World The main character of Sony's dark Cloud ($50; Sony Computer Entertainment, scea.com) may look familiar to gamers who have played any of the Zelda games from Nintendo, which featured an elf named...
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Founders Chic: Live from Philadelphia: They Cut Political Deals and Stabbed Each Other in the Back on the Way to Inventing Freedom. Why Jefferson, Adams and Their Brethren Are Suddenly Hot Again
Good thing the founders didn't rely on pollsters. At the time of the Revolution, the American colonists, John Adams recalled, were "about one third Tories"--loyal to the British crown--"and [one] third timid, and one third true blue." Adams was true...
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From Cold War to Steamy Sex: Conservative Turncoat David Brock Is an Ideal Poster Child for the Debased Politics of the '90S
David Brock is arguably the most loathed writer in Washington, which is saying something. In the decade since the Clarence Thomas hearings, Brock spent the first half despised by liberals and the second half despised by conservatives. Normally, that...
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Judgment Day: Milosevic Is at the Hague, Accused of War Crimes. but His Malevolent Spirit Lives on in Places like Macedonia
Slobodan Milosevic's humilation was by turns historic and pathetic. On Thursday afternoon the warden of Belgrade's Central Prison came to his cell and said, "Get ready, you're going." Where? "To The Hague, Mr. Milosevic." He was incredulous. "Come...
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JULY 10, 1941, in Jedwabne: Why Did Half of a Polish Town Murder the Other Half? the Answer May Be Terribly Simple
Sixty years ago, on July 10, 1941, half the Polish town of Jedwabne murdered the other half. Of 1,600 Jews, about a dozen survived. Why did the murderers do it? Prof. Jan Gross of New York University may not fully realize that he has found the answer....
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MAIL CALL: Our Readers Respond to the June 18 Issue
Is He As Good As It Gets? Our cover story on Tiger Woods drew both cheers and sneers. "This man is so far ahead of so many top golfers that you begin to feel sorry for his opponents," said a fan. Another wrote, "He demonstrates that no matter how...
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Newsmakers
Heartbreak in Hollywood America's sweethearts? How about Runaway Bride? Julia Roberts makes headline writing too darn easy. Publicists have confirmed the split between Benjamin Bratt and his notoriously skittish Pretty Woman (OK, OK, enough already)....
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Nobody's Perfect, but Some Get Close: Jack Lemmon, Feb. 8, 1925-June 27, 2001
There are movie stars we love because they, unlike us mortals, never break a sweat. And then there are the stars we love because they do our sweating for us. Jack Lemmon, one of the finest, funniest and most popular movie actors of the second half...
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Now That's Italian! 'Culinary Tourism' Is One of Travel Packagers' Newer Offerings. the Clients Don't Just Eat Lavishly, They Also Learn How to Prepare the Best of Italy's Cuisine
The hilltop village of Montefalco is a sleepy Umbrian hamlet with characteristic views of olive groves, vineyards and crumbling old villas. Villagers sip their morning cappuccino standing up at a counter, and the scent of garlic being sauteed in oil...
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Periscope
FEUDS Lunch in the White House Mess: One Hot Meal For those well versed in the blood feuds of politics, the scene in the White House mess last Thursday was surreal. It was Mexican food day; presidential counselor Karen Hughes had brought John Weaver,...
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Perspectives
"I'm told it's already an energy-efficient device." Vice President Dick Cheney, on his new pacemaker "I was a soldier, but I know of no enemy in war more insidious or vicious than AIDS." Secretary of State Colin Powell, renewing the government's...
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Pushing Poetry to Lighten Up-And Brighten Up: A Reader-Friendly New Laureate Takes the Stage
The poet Billy Collins is no stranger to crowds or publicity. His six books (and one CD) have sold nearly 100,000 copies, his readings are packed and he's read his verse on "A Prairie Home Companion." In September he hits another major poetical milestone,...
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Racing on a Full Tank of Diesel
Vin Diesel, the bullet-headed star of this summer's surprise race-car hit, "The Fast and the Furious," is a very large man with several amusing little tics. When he answers a question he mashes his eyes shut, as if he must get this sentence out or...
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Scared Silly: The Wayanses Are Back with Another Spoof-And Ready to Kill Again
Two years ago Shawn and Marlon Wayans cooked up an idea they just knew their brother Keenen would love. They wanted to do a spoof of teen slasher films like "Scream''--and they wanted him to direct. Keenen, ever the big brother, told them to make sure...
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The Philharmonic's New 'Admiral' Takes Command: If Maazel Can Make It There, He Can Make It Anywhere
Since he'll soon have an office in Manhattan's Lincoln Center, this is an oddly inauspicious fantasy for Lorin Maazel to be spinning out. "Manhattan is an island," Maazel is saying, in that voice that makes him sound like a less ingratiating Vincent...
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There's More to Right Than Might: Milosevic in the Dock Should Remind Go-It-Alone Americans Why We Need Global Rules and Courts
By sending Slobodan Milosevic to The Hague, the Serbian government has confirmed one of the oldest dictums of international relations. "The standard of justice depends on... the power to compel," wrote the Greek historian Thucydides about 2,400 years...
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The Telltale Heart (Test): Cheney Takes out an 'Insurance Policy' on His Ticker
Arriving at George Washington University Hospital last Saturday morning, Dick Cheney was typically laconic as he ran the gantlet of reporters and television cameras. Asked how he felt, the vice president simply said, "Good," and kept on walking. Minutes...
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Ventura's Shutdown Smackdown: 'The Body' Learns the Fine Art of Brinkmanship
The land of Lake Wobegon had gone to gridlock, a Minnesota version of the Bill-and-Newt spat that idled the federal government five years ago. But Gov. Jesse Ventura was not about to feel anybody's pain. He intended to inflict it. "The trump card here...
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Walking with the Buffaloes: To Really Dig into Foreign Cultures, Learn Their Crafts
If cooking is not your bag, how about painting, photography or quilting? For people whose passions lie somewhere in the broad field of arts and crafts, a growing number of trips gives a vacationer hands-on lessons, often with exposure to another culture--overseas...
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Wanted: A Week of 'Quiet': Both Sides Are Putting a Tenuous Ceasefire to the Test
Nasfad al-Khuffash is just about out of patience. But he has nowhere to go. An employee of the relief agency World Vision in Ramallah, Khuffash had high hopes for an easing of the Israeli siege after Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat signed a ceasefire...
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You Want How Much for That: Fill Up Your Wallet. the Price of Summer Fun Is Heading through the Ozone
To save money, Ray and Anita DeSilva usually vacation close to their Beaverton, Ore., home. But this year the DeSilvas decided to splurge and take their 16-year-old son to Orlando, Fla. They cashed in some frequent-flier miles and budgeted about $4,000...
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