Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 133, No. 17, April 26

A Magical Lobbying Tour : China's Reformist Prime Minister One-Ups Clinton and Saves a WTO Deal. but Will Congress OK It?
He came. He saw. He lobbied. And by the time Zhu Rongji returned to Beijing last week, he had won over America's business community, cajoled an embarrassed White House into committing to a trade deal--and, just perhaps, brought U.S.-China relations...
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Behind a Band of Rebels
On the Ground: The KLA has taken a beating, but NATO is still talking up the insurgents' chances, and thousands of new recruits are eager to fight the Serbs. The newest soldiers of the Kosovo Liberation Army arrived by ferry in the Albanian port...
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Casualties of War
Collateral Damage: A month into NATO's air war against Milosevic, questions pile up. Who was to blame for the deadly bomb attack on a convoy of Kosovar refugees? Can other civilian tragedies be avoided? And do Washington and its allies have the stomach...
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Chemo in Question
Higher doses may not help breast cancer--yet For a woman, perhaps the only news worse than "you've got breast cancer" is the diagnosis "and it's spread." Hearing those words, thousands of women in the last decade have chosen aggressive, debilitating...
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Dawn of A New Solar System
One star, three giant planets: astronomers come closer to finding a place in the universe that looks like home Geoffrey Marcy spotted it first, late one evening in early March, and he dashed off an e-mail to a colleague in Australia before heading...
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Echoes of a Tragedy
An architect of the Vietnam War on why we must remember the lessons of Southeast Asia Robert McNamara helped prosecute the war in Vietnam, a conflict in which many of the issues raised anew in the Balkans--the effectiveness of air power, the cost...
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Eyewitness to Terror : As Reports of Possible Serb Atrocities Mount, an Account of a Civilian Slaughter
Isuf Zhuniqi was certain that he was about to die. The 39-year-old farmer from the village of Bellacerka in southwest Kosovo waited, trembling, with about 50 male relatives in a rocky field. Twenty Serb policemen barked in Serbo-Croatian, ordering...
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Farewell to the Glory
In the postwar years, television became our national electronic hearth. During their heyday, the Big Three networks spun fortunes, dominated our popular culture and shaped our politics. But, alas, new rivals cable, the VCR and computers all came crowding...
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Folks, Please Remain Seated : 'Pushing Tin,' in Holding Pattern, Never Lands
Air-traffic controllers call what they do "Pushing Tin." It's a maximum- stress job that calls for split-second reflexes, nerves of steel and high levels of testosterone. Mike Newell's comedy, written by "Taxi" and "Cheers" veterans Glen and Les Charles,...
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From Middleman to Media Multiplex
As the networks' traditional way of doing business stops working, the name of the new game is to own as much of the media pie as you can. ABC takes shows produced by sister studios and tries to repurpose and repackage them on TV, cable and the Web....
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Getting the Drug You Need
Sure, your health plan covers prescriptions. But don't assume it covers the one that will help you. Like many Americans, Robert Hammerl depends on drugs for his quality of life. The 72-year-old lives alone in Long Beach, Calif., and had only a mild...
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I Don't like Green Eggs and Ham!
Industrial farming isn't just bad for hogs, chickens and the environment. It produces tasteless food. The Earth Pledge Foundation has asked Americans to consider, on Earth Day, the meaning of "sustainable cuisine." Arguably, the most sustainable...
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Maureen Biology : Dissecting Bill Clinton Has Its Own Rewards
It's April 8 last year, only six weeks in, and she's writing, "I'm sick of everyone in this bloated, blowsy, snarled, mercenary, vengeful, low-rent mess of a scandal." Nevertheless, she soldiered on until the last gavel rapped, because it was her scandal....
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Metropolitan Gentleman : Arrogant? Hey, Philippe De Montebello Gets It Done
At a fancy Parisian hotel not long ago, an American journalist told Philippe de Montebello he was "heartbroken" over a Renaissance painting by Dosso Dossi in a show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Why didn't the Met buy it and keep it...
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Mr. Jesus, Call Your Office
To keep up with the mania for business how-to's--one survey has shown that most execs wolf down a book a month--publishers are furiously casting historical, even fictional, figures as management gurus. As the icons of leadership become more improbable,...
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Nothing like the Dame
Still glowing from Oscar night, great Brit Judi Dench sweeps into a flush of spring roles In her dressing room in Broadway's Ethel Barrymore Theater, Dame Judi Dench senses the presence of former occupants like Marlon Brando and Karl Malden, who...
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Nothing Much to Celebrate : Kosovo Has Transformed NATO's Anniversary Bash into a Somber Summit-And a Good Opportunity to Ponder a New Kind of War
It was billed in advance as a celebration, the largest summit meeting ever hosted in the United States. About 1,700 dignitaries from 44 countries were to gather in Washington this week to mark the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Atlantic alliance....
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Now, It's Designer Meals : Why Settle for What's on the Menu, When You Can Have the Chef Cook 10 Courses Just for You?
Would you like the chef to cook for you? Once, ordering a restaurant meal was a straightforward transaction, requiring only a simple balancing of greed against calories and price. That, though, was before American chefs became almost as famous as fashion...
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Out of the Box : The TV Networks May Be on the Brink of Extinction. So ABC and Disney Are Trying to Reinvent Television as 'Tele-Fusion.' Goodbye, Boob Tube. Hello, Oscar.com, Buddy Cams and Zoogs
The top executives at ABC had flown out to Aspen to meet with their boss, Disney CEO Michael Eisner. A key item on the agenda: reviewing their plans for the network in the world of new media. They told Eisner about how ABCnews.com had grown, and about...
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Pamela Downsizes While Britney Blooms
First Tommy, then "Baywatch" and now--in a truly bizarre career move -- Pamela Anderson has ditched her size-36D breasts. Anderson says she removed her implants for personal, not health, reasons. "I felt like I was Dolly Parton for the longest time,"...
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Pen, Paper, Power! Confessional Writing Can Be Good for You
For decades, Lori Galloway had recurring dreams about shooting or bombing her father and stepfather. Years of sexual abuse as a child left her feeling like "the most worthless person on the face of the earth." Just talking about the trauma prompted...
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Perspectives
"Daily." Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr, telling CNN's Larry King how often he feels sorry he didn't become dean of Pepperdine University's law school in 1997, when the position was offered to him "Why was a refugee convoy escorted by Serb...
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Reese on Earth : Witherspoon Is a Fine, Grounded Actress. Good Thing. at 23, She's about to Juggle a Career, a Beau and a Baby
She is visibly pregnant and her back hurts and she's hungry. Though her hair is up in a bun, a blond lock has sprung loose and keeps swinging in front of her eyes, like a broken windshield wiper. Reese Witherspoon, 23, is in the kitchen of her little...
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Ricky the Remarkable : Baseball's Best All-Round Career in the Last Quarter Century? the Case for Mr. Henderson
Mark McGwire's biceps symbolize big bang baseball. Rickey Henderson's thighs, which are responsible for what still may be the quickest first step in baseball, are the key to this: baseball's history is written largely in numbers, and numbers say Henderson's...
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Scam Busters on the Web : A Cottage Industry of Critics Tries to Save Dreamers and Investors from Themselves
Talk about fattening profits and making your business more efficient. For swindlers and hustlers, there's nothing like the Web. Lies can be spread to millions of trusting people at warp speed, and the arm of the law isn't long enough to halt more than...
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Stopping the Catastrophe : In an Exclusive Interview, Germany's New Chancellor Says That His Country Has a Moral Obligation in Kosovo That Can't Be Ignored
Last fall when Gerhard Schroder, leader of Germany's Social Democratic Party, was elected chancellor, U.S. officials wondered if Bonn would remain the staunch American ally it had been under his predecessor, Helmut Kohl. After all, Schroder had spent...
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The First Americans
New digs and old bones reveal an ancient land that was a mosaic of peoples--including Asians and Europeans. Now a debate rages: who got here first? As he sat down to his last meal amid the cattails and sedges on the shore of the ancient lake, the...
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The Ice Man Goeth : Hockey's Hero, Wayne Gretzky, Skates Away
If hockey were remotely as popular in the United States as it is in Canada, Wayne Gretzky's retirement might have provoked the same national outpouring of grief that Michael Jordan's did. It didn't, but it's nonetheless arguable that Gretzky--not Jordan--was...
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The Kosovo Primary
Now playing on cable: the GOP presidential field on the war in the Balkans. If you're running for president, there's nothing like cuddling a child, on camera. Elizabeth Dole flew all the way to a refugee camp in Macedonia last week to find both--the...
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The Luck of the Draw : A Privately Funded School-Voucher Lottery Has Low- Income Parents Hoping-And Critics Yelping
Eight-year-old Frankey Moss Jr. wants to be a professional basketball player. "And a doctor," he says. "And a lawyer." His 16-year-old sister, Akiba, wants to earn a degree in mechanical engineering. Their 39-year-old single mother, Gloria, is determined...
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Trash TV on Trial : Kevorkian's Flamboyant Lawyer, Geoffrey Fieger, Takes on Jenny Jones
If by some chance you still haven't heard of Geoffrey Fieger, then you really need to stay in more. Last week Fieger was on Court TV all day long, starring as the lawyer ripping into talk-show host Jenny Jones in a Pontiac, Mich., courtroom. Meanwhile,...
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Why Troops Take Time : Ground Forces Could Help End the War-But Getting Them to the Front Isn't an Easy Task
As the air war in Kosovo grinds on, the inevitable question keeps coming up: why not send in ground troops to stop Slobodan Milosevic's brutality against ethnic Albanians? Last week several members of Congress came out in favor of troops, arguing that...
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