Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 134, No. 15, October 11

A 100 Percent Tax on Speech? Bradley's Idea Would Eviscerate the First Amendment in the Name of Campaign Reform
At a stroke, Bill Bradley recently refuted the bromide that he is boring, and in doing so he usefully illuminated the upcoming Senate debate on campaign finance reform. He did all this with a remarkable proposal--a proposal flagrantly unconstitutional...
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A Big Name Enters the MP3 Fray, Epic Proportions, Birds and Bees, Decorate Your Home from the Comfort of ...Home
Until now, all of the portable digital music players have come from smaller manufacturers like Diamond and Creative Labs. Next week RCA debuts its Lyra ($199; www.lyrazone.com). The Lyra supports both MP3 and RealNetworks G2 formats, and can be easily...
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A Goose Step into the Future: With Its 50th-Anniversary Gala, China Sends a Mixed Message to Washington
He didn't look like the jovial Jiang Zemin that Washington has come to know--the well-tailored fellow with the agreeable smile. On Friday, dressed in a somber Mao suit, a dark gray speck amid a colorful sea of 500,000 Chinese, China's president spoke...
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Anatomy of an Outbreak: As the Northeast Grappled with a Mysterious Mosquitoborne Illness, Scientists Investigating a Rash of Dead Crows Discovered They Were Chasing the Same Virus
As it turns out, it wasn't the ailing old folks who heralded the arrival of a deadly new contagion in New York this summer. By the time aging patients began languishing in Flushing Hospital--confused, racked by fever, weak to the point of paralysis--crows...
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A Shock Grows in Brooklyn: A Fiery Controversy over a Museum's New Show Brings New York City's Mayor out Slugging
Arnold Lehman, director of the Brooklyn Museum, was recalling his last meeting with New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani. It took place in July at City Hall, where the two bantered about baseball--Giuliani's a well-known Yankees fan, while Lehman has...
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Behind the Beatty Buzz: It's Come to This: An Actor Playing an Actor Thinking about Running for President
In "Wag the Dog," Dustin Hoffman played a Hollywood producer who staged a war to help a president snared in a sex scandal with a Girl Scout. But last Wednesday night, he was spinning for a real-life presidential wanna-be. Sort of. "Warren Beatty wouldn't...
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Can It Happen Here? Japan Suffers the Worst Nuclear Accident since Chernobyl, Reigniting a Safety Debate
When a uranium- processing plant north of Tokyo leaked a burst of radiation last week, housewife Terumi Terunuma called town hall to find out what to do. Tokaimura is a company town for Japan's nuclear industry, home to 15 separate facilities. But...
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He's Flying Solo: Former Soundgarden Singer Chris Cornell Hits the Charts
Things are looking a little bleak to Chris Cornell, which is how he likes it. He's just released his first solo album, and, to get a sense of how he feels about the music industry at large, you ask if he watched the MTV Video Music Awards a while back....
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Hitting the Bull's-Eye: Target Sets Its Sights on East Coast Expansion
Target stores' new marketing blitz brings new meaning to the term "fashion victim." After launching a series of ads this summer featuring Gen-X models in fashions dotted with its red and white bull's-eye logo, Target was deluged with calls from consumers...
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Inheriting: Don't Blow It: Family Money, Passed Down, May Be Your Last, Best Shot at Living Well When You Retire
Many a baby boomer has a single retirement strategy: inherit the money. That's not an unreasonable idea. Thanks to America's sturdy economic growth, the older generation holds a vast amount of wealth. More than half of the boomers 50 to 53 expect an...
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'I Still Hear Screams': One of the Few Survivors of the No Gun Ri Incident Describes a Terrifying Three Days and Nights
Now a 62-year-old farmer from Joo Gong Ri, Chung Goo Ho is one of about 20 people who lived through the massacre. Last week, he discussed the ordeal with NEWSWEEK's B. J. Lee. I'll never forget how hot that day was. It was July 26, 1950, and I was...
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'I've Tried to Repent': An American GI Recalls How a Bunch of Untrained Soldiers Were Ordered to Gun Down Korean Civilians
South Korean villagers from the town of No Gun Ri have alleged for years that on July 26, 1950, early in the Korean War, American soldiers massacred hundreds of civilians in their hamlet, located about 100 miles from Seoul. Over the years, both the...
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L.A.'S Dirty War on Gangs: A Trail of Corruption Leads to Some of the City's Toughest Cops
The July 1996 raid on a gang-infested apartment building looked like just another skirmish between police and L.A.'s many street gangs. The address was Shatto Place, in a neighborhood of Latino immigrants west of downtown. The target was the notorious...
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Look Who's Running: Meet the Wild Bunch, a Band of Quasi Candidates with Big Egos and Often Even Bigger Bank Accounts. They Hate the System, but They Often Care Little about Winning Power. Their Aim Is to Rattle the Foundations of the Political Establishment. It's the Triumph of Entertainment, and It's One Helluva Show
So far this fall at Harvard, Billy Graham has come to lecture, as has the former prime minister of Britain, and the presidents of Tanzania and the Dominican Republic. This week, at the request of the students at the Institute of Politics, the timbre...
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Making the Case for Hands-On Courts: Judges Are Learning That a Problem-Solving Approach Can Stop the Cycles of Drug Use and Dysfunction
When I graduated from law school back in 1962, becoming a judge was the farthest thing from my mind. Not that the idea wasn't appealing. I was intrigued by the intellectual challenges that the job posed as well as the opportunity to "do justice" and...
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Maximum Exposure, Boxing's New Butterfly, Tonya Skates Back, Oscar? Who Needs It?
It's only natural that Melissa Joan Hart would want to get away from her G-rated image as TV's "Sabrina the Teenage Witch." After all, she's 23. But Archie Comics, which owns the rights to the Sabrina character, was spooked by the bare witch's sizzling...
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Moscow 'Will Hear from Us', Space Program for Sale, Bringing New Life to Auschwitz, Should Your Babies Sleep with You?, L.A. Eats It, Six Degrees from Hollywood, Old-Time Wrong Verdict?, 'Out of Town' Is out of Luck, Do We Tip the Optometrist?, Primo Pedro, Household Saint
Last spring, U.S. officials talked proudly about their bombs-away strategy in Kosovo. But now, as the Russians pursue what they maintain is a similar campaign against the breakaway region of Chechnya, those officials are warning Moscow to back off....
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Now He's the Man to See, by Matt Bai: He's Beguiling, Blunt and Sometimes over the Top. but Jesse Ventura Is Muscling His Way into National Politics, Drawing Other Political Outsiders into His Orbit as 2000 Takes Shape. with Buckskins and Candid Talk, He's 'Giving 'Em What They Want.' the Making of a Maverick
Tim Penny got his first dose of Jesse the Governor within days of the election last November. The morning of the victory party, a dazed Ventura woke up in a mild panic, with no idea of what to do next. So he called Penny, a respected centrist and former...
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Perspectives
"THIS APPEARS TO BE A LOCAL DISASTER AND NOT A GLOBAL ONE." DAVID LOCHBAUM, NUCLEAR-SAFETY ENGINEER WITH THE UNION OF CONCERNED SCIENTISTS, ON THE FUEL ACCIDENT THAT IGNITED A CHAIN REACTION IN A JAPANESE NUCLEAR PLANT LAST WEEK, EXPOSING AT LEAST...
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Stagecraft and Statecraft: The Real Question Is Not Whether Celebrities Should Have Political Clout, but How They Use It
Jesse Ventura fancies himself a kingmaker, but he may get outclassed by another celebrity with a shaved head. Last spring Bill Bradley received a campaign contribution from a man described on Federal Election Commission records as "Michael Jordan,...
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Suing Hollywood's Suits: Court TV: Top Actors and Producers Accuse Media Giants of Shady Dealings in the Sale of Hit Shows
The truth is out there. Yet in "The X-Files's" bizarre world of alien invaders, FBI Agent Mulder has yet to find it, even after seven seasons in the starring role in the hit Fox television series. David Duchovny, who stars as Mulder, however, believes...
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The Donald: 'You Just Do It': Seriously Mulling a Run, Trump Speaks out on Leadership, the Sacrifices of a Campaign and His One Weakness
As he plotted the next steps in his possible run for the presidency, New York developer Donald Trump talked with NEWSWEEK's Howard Fineman about prospects for the Reform Party--and for his own candidacy. Excerpts: FINEMAN: You wrote this week that...
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The Perils of Pasta: As Many as 1 Million Americans May Have an Intolerance for Gluten, an Ingredient of More Foods Than You May Think
Mary Mack thought she was dying. For 11 years, the secretary from Baton Rouge, La., suffered digestive problems. Her weight dropped from 140 pounds to 110. Her hair fell out in clumps. Good teeth were coming out. Her bones ached. Doctors diagnosed...
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The VP: 'Nothin' Left to Lose': Trying to Project a New, Looser Image, Gore Promises to 'Campaign like an Underdog' against the Surging Bradley
Last week vice president Gore announced that he is moving his campaign headquarters from Washington to Nashville and challenged his opponent, Bill Bradley, to a series of debates. Gore spoke with NEWSWEEK's Jonathan Alter in New York City last week...
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The Wrong Rights: We Need Rights to Prevention, Not Just Payments
The patriotically named "Patients' Bill of Rights" is making its way through Congress. It would put into law sound medical practice--requiring insurance companies to cover care that doctors believe is "medically necessary" and allow subscribers easier...
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'Thought-Leaders' in the Internet Age: The Smart Money Says Venerable, Serious Journals like the Atlantic Can't Reach Readers Anymore. A New Team Is Betting That's Wrong
There's an old story about the love of ideas for their own sake: after his inauguration in 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt went to the Washington home of Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. He wanted to pay his respects to the retired Supreme Court justice,...
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Trouble to the Right: Now It's the Son's Challenge to Come to Terms with the Conservative True Believers Who Bedeviled His Father
It looked, for a moment, like a perfect opportunity for George W. Bush. Pat Buchanan, the pugnacious conservative, had suggested in a new book that the United States could have avoided fighting Nazi Germany in World War II. At the same time, Buchanan...
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TV's Top Dogs: Brand-Name Television Creators Are Dominating the New Season. Aaron Sorkin and John Wells Are Two of the Hottest
Aaron Sorkin actually thinks he has writer's block. The creator of "Sports Night" and "The West Wing" has already tossed off 11 scripts for both shows this season. But on a Tuesday in late August, with just a week to write his next two episodes, Sorkin...
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Walk like a Man, Talk like a Man: Revisiting the Real-Life Murder of Brandon Teena
Kimberly Peirce, the director of the heartbreaking "Boys Don't Cry," has been obsessed with the story of Brandon Teena ever since she read about his death in 1993. Brandon, born as Teena Brandon, was a 21-year-old Nebraska girl who passed as a boy,...
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We're Running out of Dot.coms: Good Domain Names Have Become So Scarce That the Techies Need to Create a New Approach
Even in a period when home prices are soaring, it seems that the hottest real estate is virtual. Have you tried to secure an address on the Internet lately? Not only are all the good names taken, but likely as not, your name is already spoken for,...
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'We Want Our Land Back': Syria's Foreign Minister on the Price for Peace with Israel
Although president Clinton has made it his mission to restart peace talks between Syria and Israel, Syria's foreign minister, Farouk al-Shara, talked tough in an interview last week with NEWSWEEK's Lally Weymouth. WEYMOUTH: How was your meeting...
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What's a Fountain Pen?, Livin' la Vida Online, Waco Won't Go Away, Get Smart, Go to Sleep, Troubled Times in East Timor, Life Is Beautiful
Most readers who wrote about our Sept. 20 cover story ("e-Life," Special Report) were excited by the changes the Internet has brought. "It's a modern-day miracle," said one, "and we have just seen the tip of the iceberg." Another confessed, "When I...
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When Pets Pop Pills: The Big Drugmakers Are Racing to Develop Products for the Lucrative 'Companion Animal' Market
Dale Miller had a problem with his little dog, Button. He was harassing guests, and whenever Miller left the house, the year-old Maltese would melt down in a fit of separation anxiety. But Miller knew just what to do. He put him on a new drug called...
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Why Al's Going South: Nothing Seems to Be Working. His Back to the Wall, with Bradley Closing in, Gore Tries to Find His Way
The coronation strategy was not working, and Al Gore knew it. For months his advisers and pollsters had mistakenly told him that he could ignore Bill Bradley's challenge and inherit the Democratic nomination by playing it safe. But polls showed Bradley...
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Yogurt Goes Tubular: General Mills Has a Hit with the Lunchbox Set
It's lunchtime at a parochial school in Brookline, Mass., and the third graders are chowing down. Amid the tuna sandwiches lies a new treat: tubes filled with squeezable, wildly flavored yogurt. All but one of the eight children at this table have...
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