Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 5

A Deal with Taxing Consequences: Seagate's Pacts with Veritas Show How Tax Avoidance Can Save Lots More for Shareholders Than Manufacturing Can Make for Them
Seagate technology has been making computer-disk drives for 20 years and has become the biggest player in a fast-changing, ultracompetitive business. A notable accomplishment. But instead of being a story about American technological and manufacturing...
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A Difficult Formula: Math = Fun: At Williams College, Even Calculus Is Cool
At most colleges there's only one thing less popular than a calculus class: a 9 a.m. calculus class. But on a recent morning at Williams College, all 50-odd seats are filled as Edward Berger teaches differentiation. Not even Berger, a former stand-up...
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Al Gore's Next Makeover: Behind His New Strategy to Get Traction against Bush
It was near midnight, and Al Gore was still aboard Air Force Two, flying home to Washington. In the forward cabin he'd changed into slacks and a Timberland shirt, cleared his desk of all but his Palm, and was explaining--yet again--why the polls showing...
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A New Roof on an Old House
A slate roof is a humbling thing. The one we're putting on the old farmhouse is Pennsylvania blue black, and it's meant to last at least a hundred years. Jeff the roof guy showed us the copper nails he's using to hang it; they're supposed to last just...
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A 'Rebirth' Brings Death: A Controversial Therapy for Children Diagnosed with Attachment Disorder Draws Intense Scrutiny
In the four years since Jeane Newmaker adopted Candace, then 6, the little girl had never let her mother hold her. But while an initial reluctance to give her heart to a stranger might have been understandable, Candace's problems went further: she...
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Charity Begins with a Click
When my parents back in the '60s told me to eat my peas because poor kids were starving in India or someplace, there was always a logical connection missing. They were asking me to put the fork in my mouth, not little Rajiv's. Was that compassionate?...
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Coffee, Tea Or. Tennis? Coming to a Runway near You: The World's Biggest Passenger Jet. Airbus Is Pitching Its 'Superjumbo' as a Flying Cruise Ship to Replace Boeing's 747 as the Wings of Choice for Globe-trotters.With Scott Johnson in Paris
There are still a few glitches to be worked out for the A3XX, the plane poised to become the world's largest passenger jet. Airbus is still refining the emergency evacuation chutes to slow down the hair-raising slide from the plane's upper deck to...
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From High Art to the Art of the Deal: As a Bobo& a 'Bourgeois Bohemian' I Always Thought I Was above Mere Commerce. but Now I Have Something to Sell. Scenes from a Book Tour
I have a confession to make: I'm 38 years old and I've never sold anything before. As a writer and journalist, I've always thought I was above mere commerce. But now I'm on tour trying to flog my book "Bobos in Paradise: The New Upper Class and How...
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Guarding Online Privacy: Do You Know Who's Watching as You Surf the Web? the FTC and Software Developers Are Looking for New Ways to Protect Users
It's a web surfer's nightmare. You've been merrily cruising the sites, checking out everything from a '60s memorabilia auction to the requirements for entering universities in Britain. Suddenly, you start getting some strange e-mail. One correspondent...
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I Got It: Mentoring Isn't for the Mentor: Spending Time with a Child Who Didn't like Me Wasn't What I'd Had in Mind. Now, I Know, It Isn't about Me
From the first moment I heard about Pipeline NAU, a mentoring program matching Northern Arizona University professors with low-income middle-school students, I knew I wanted to be a mentor. The students who complete the five-year program with a...
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In Search of the Next 'Body' Slam: Ventura's Man Is Hunting a Winner
Here are a few names you may not hear again this election season. There's William Toel, an independent Senate candidate in Arizona, who's thinking about riding across the state on horseback, in 100-degree temperatures, dressed as the "Arizona Ranger."...
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It's Our Property
My band was recording a song called "I Disappear" for the "Mission: Impossible 2" soundtrack when we heard that six different versions of the song--works in progress--had been made available on Napster. We don't know how the music got out, but somewhere...
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I Will Survive: For Money and Ratings, 16 Castaways Washed Up on a Desert Island. Only One Would Make It. in a NEWSWEEK Exclusive, Four Tell Their Stories: The Fighting, the Eating Everything but the Winner
Sit right back and you'll hear a tale, a tale of a fateful trip. This week CBS debuts "Survivor," a 13-part reality show set on a desolate island off Borneo. Based on a highly successful Swedish series, "Survivor" follows the exploits of eight men...
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Microsoft's Reckoning: Bill Gates's Next Big Thing Gets Rained Out
Microsoft's past and its future were on a collision course. This week a federal judge in Washington appears ready to give the go-ahead to the government's plan to break up the software giant for its past antitrust violations. The timing of that bad...
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Muffed Mission: A Much-Anticipated Sequel Self-Destructs
The first time Tom Cruise rips off his latex mask and turns out to be someone else, it's cool. The next time someone else rips off his face and turns out to be Tom Cruise, it's still a kick. By the third and fourth time this ploy is used, you're not...
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Perspectives
"We will have more positive influence with an outstretched hand than with a clenched fist." President Clinton, defending the House legislation that approved normal trade rights for China "It is a police state, a place where injustice is law and...
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Prying Eyes, Keep Out: New Software Will Allow Users to Encrypt Messages-With a Click. Is It Only for the Truly Paranoid?
A few years ago, John Blumenthal was on a consulting job for a foreign company and complained via e-mail to his American partner about the team he was working with. His partner, for some unexplained reason, forwarded the message to the team overseas,...
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Retreat, Regret, Relief: Israel's Lebanon Withdrawal Has Echoes of Vietnam
The calculus of Israel's troubled history in Lebanon seems, at first glance, simple enough. Add up the invasions, "operations," commando raids, kidnappings and massacres by proxy armies. Then count the dead: thousands of Lebanese and Palestinian civilians,...
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Safaris and Sensitivity
Bushwhacking through virgin rain forests and fording piranha-infested rivers isn't for everyone it just seems that way. Ecotourism has become big business. Throngs of travelers now make their way to remote wilderness areas, seeking out natural wonders...
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Sofas for the Masses: Houseware Chains Hope Cheap Will Become Chic
For Leslie Wilder, fashion is not just something you wear. It's where you live. In the past three years, she has spent $12,000 decorating her Seattle home with funky furnishings like a red art deco couch, a purple chaise longue and black cube end tables....
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Something New in Market Risk: How a Margin Account Can Bring You Down, Even If You Thought You Didn't Have a Loan
In a risky stock market, what's your worst nightmare? How about losing far more money than you put up? How about losing it when you didn't even know you were at risk? And then being sued for everything you have? Good markets are always good in the...
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Speaking with the Devil: What Do You Ask the Man Who Has Everything, Including His Own Rapping Midget? Maybe This
Six-foot-six bodyguard big Wayne, rapping midget Joe C. and two strippers clad in stars-and-stripes bikinis traipse through Kid Rock's "SNL" dressing room. "This isn't a band, this is a circus," proclaims the 29-year-old, who's become a ringmaster...
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The Book on E-Publishing
While music execs try to cope with online distribution, their counterparts in the book world are well aware that they're next. Oddly, the unmistakable milestone in digital publishing--Stephen King's "Riding the Bullet," an original e-book creation...
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The Buddy Who Has Bush's Ear: Far from Austin, 'Bowly' Betts Stays in the Loop
On a Saturday afternoon last fall, George W. Bush was in a hang-dog mood. Ridiculed by the press after failing to remember the names of various foreign leaders during a TV interview, Bush had just slogged through a two-hour remedial session with his...
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The Good, the Bad, the Boring: On the Site of a Former Slaughterhouse and a 'Mad Max' Movie Set, Sydney Has Created an Efficient but Ultimately Disappointing Home for the Olympics
Around the vast new Olympic Park in Sydney, Australia, there are four humble buildings scattered like dice, dwarfed by the sports complexes that will be home to the Games that begin in September. The little structures are identical except for the color...
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The Japan That Can Say Yes: Japan; Insular, Homogenous; Has Never Put out the Welcome Mat to Foreign Workers. Now, in an Act of Self-Preservation, It May Be Forced To
It began with a journey to earn a few quick bucks. In 1990 Iranian watchmaker Behrooz Kheyri Idehloo planned to work in Japan temporarily, then stock up on watch parts and head back home. He quickly found a steady, well-paying job installing air conditioners,...
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The Last Titan of the Theater: Sir John Gielgud, 1904-2000
I spoke rather well," Sir John Gielgud once said, recalling his early days in the theater, "but rather too well, and fell in love with my own voice." So did the rest of the world. How could you ever, ever describe it? Alec Guinness's much-quoted phrase,...
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The Long March Begins: Clinton Wins a Key WTO Victory, but It Won't Be Easy for U.S. Businesses to Break into China in a Big Way
For Bill Clinton at least, the hard part is over. As his staff gathered in the place where their boss once strayed with Monica Lewinsky--George Stephanopoulos's old West Wing office--to watch on C-Span, the president known for lurching from disaster...
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The Noisy War over Napster
Meet the Napster Generation. Rachel is 14, an eight grader in Potomac, Md., who loves lacrosse, basketball and guitar. Listens to 'N Sync. Like millions of her peers with a computer and a clue, she's been using a program called Napster to download...
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The Secret Money Chase: The Race for Campaign Cash Is Taking a New Turn into the Shadows with 'Stealth PACs'attack Operations That Don't Have to Reveal Who's Paying the Bills. A NEWSWEEK Special Report
Trent Lott was angry, and he got right to the point. Early last month the Senate majority leader called in a group of high-tech lobbyists and made a blunt pitch. He said he was outraged over a series of "vicious" attack ads airing in Michigan against...
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These Parties Get a Rave Review: Two Techno Films Capture the Agony and the Ecstasy
Every generation needs its ecstatic rituals, and today's kids have raves, chemically friendly overnight bliss-outs presided over by electronic shamans with names like DJ Spooky or Scanner or Moby. Manning the control boards like captains of a psychedelic...
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Turbulence Ahead: A Big Airline Merger Is Stuck in a Holding Pattern
The industry that gave the world the jumbo jet has another big idea--the jumbo airline. United Airlines wants to buy US Airways in a $4.3 billion deal that would make it the largest carrier in the United States by far, with 500,000 passengers traveling...
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Wrestling for the Center: The Pro Pols Wonder If Jesse Can Deliver the Ventura Voters
You wouldn't expect Al Gore (Harvard '69) to find much in common with Jesse Ventura (WWF '84). But when the veep and the Body first met over breakfast in Minneapolis last March, surprised aides could hear the two men laughing through the door of Gore's...
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