Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 8

A New Chapter for Laura Bush: She Expected a Quiet First Ladyship, but Now History's Changed That. How the Crisis Is Reshaping Her Role-And Possibly Her Marriage
Always a lover of words, Laura Bush is finding that her own carry more weight than she could have imagined just weeks ago. Last Tuesday she was in New York City and left a bouquet of sunflowers tied with a red-white-and-blue ribbon at a midtown fire...
Read preview Overview
Bush's Reality Check: He Knows How Hard This Is. but as Bush Rattles Sabers against Bin Laden, His Tough Talk May Give Him Much-Needed Room to Maneuver
Aboard Air Force One, on the way to Chicago, the talk turned to crop-dusters. George W. Bush mused aloud about how terrorism had turned a lowly form of aviation into a potentially lethal weapon. "Who would have thought of crop-dusters?" he asked the...
Read preview Overview
... but Let's Not Go Overboard
Even as workers continue clearing the rubble from the former World Trade Center, a major rebuilding effort has already begun just a few steps away, on Wall Street. That attempt, which is far less visible than the heavy equipment at the Trade Center...
Read preview Overview
Bylines
When NEWSWEEK reporters first raced to the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, they had no inkling of the enormity of what they were about to witness: how could they? Arian Campo-Flores remembers his first view of the devastating vista of Ground...
Read preview Overview
Commandos: The Real Tip of the Spear: A New War's Front Line
It is usually the disasters that people remember. In 1979 it was the helicopters of Desert One lying burned and gutted in the Iranian desert; inside were eight dead Delta Force commandos and pilots who never got off the ground in a botched effort to...
Read preview Overview
Everything Is under Control: Of Course You Know It's a Lie. but Doesn't It Sound a Whole Lot Better Than the Truth?
So I go over to the school to vote in the New York City primary, and I'm in the booth looking at all the names and the levers and the sign at the top that says information for voters, and it's deja vu all over again. This is where I stood, this is...
Read preview Overview
Intelligence: Gearing Up for a Shadow Struggle: This Battle Won't Be Quick. from Spies to Special Forces, Nation-Building to High Tech, How America Should Be Fighting This Conflict against Terror
The evidence against Lotfi Raissi seemed pretty damning. The Algerian pilot had allegedly given flying instructions to four of the suspected hijackers in the suicide attacks on New York and Washington. Raissi swore that he was totally innocent, but...
Read preview Overview
Living A New Normal
If a nation really did have a collective psyche, right about now America's friends might suggest that it could possibly be time to, you know, maybe see somebody about this? Just think of the stress points. The largest terrorist attack ever, the most...
Read preview Overview
Mail Call
Civility, Glory and Normalcy We heard from more than 2,000 readers last week in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 tragedy, many urging restraint and finding hope in national unity. "We must not allow our anger over the attacks to drive us to violate...
Read preview Overview
My Turn: Finding the Courage to Be a 'Marine Mama': My Son Is Prepared for Possible Deployment, but I Search for Strength in My Grandmother's Experience
As a novice runner, I take advantage of any motivational tool I can find to get myself going. One of my favorites is a tape of the cadence calls used by Marine drill instructors to encourage performance. As many times as I've heard it, I still cringe...
Read preview Overview
Newsmakers: This Week: Sports Moves on, MSNBC's Anchorwoman Gets a Dye-Job
The Games Must Go On The two biggest sports stories of the year barely registered on the national seismograph last week. Michael Jordan announced his return to the NBA, and Barry Bonds inched closer to Mark McGwire's home-run record, but there was...
Read preview Overview
Now's the Time for a Stimulus
The case for an "economic stimulus" is that our present predicament is unprecedented. We are reacting to both the largest terrorist attack in U.S. history and the aftermath of the biggest economic boom in U.S. history. American spirits and spending...
Read preview Overview
Periscope: NEWSWEEK's Look Behind and beyond the News
EXCLUSIVE Piecing Together The Puzzle The Syrian army colonel just disappeared. He was being watched by U.S. intelligence for his role as an expert in biological and chemical warfare when he vanished last February. "Is the colonel working for bin...
Read preview Overview
Perspectives
"Everyone is very twitchy right now." Brig. Gen. J. D. Hunter, on fighter jets that have scrambled several times in the past two weeks because of false alarms on commercial flights "We must be aware of the superiority of our civilization, a system...
Read preview Overview
Rising above the Ruins: Nation-Building
The gorges of Ghorband form a natural fortress. To get to the dugouts along the front lines, you take a road that snakes around towering crags, above a river valley of astonishing beauty. Mud-brick and stone villages cling to the hillsides, approachable...
Read preview Overview
Technology: A High-Tech Home Front
At the airports, the much-maligned minimum-wage screeners confiscated nail clippers and corkscrews while cops and soldiers patrolled the corridors. Lines formed at the borders, traffic slowed on the highways, and bridges and tunnel approaches were...
Read preview Overview
The Media's 'Balancing' Act
The once legendary Sen. Hiram Johnson was the first to say it, back in 1917. But the idea is as old as human conflict: in war, truth is "the first casualty." From the phony reports on Sept. 11 ("The State Department's been hit by a car bomb!") to rumors...
Read preview Overview
The Nagging Fear of Nukes: U.S. Planners Must Consider the Awful What-Ifs
Anyone who doubts the threat of nuclear terrorism should ask the Russians about it. In 1993 Chechen saboteurs left a package of highly radioactive cesium in Moscow's Izmailovo Park. Authorities managed to avert disaster, but the incident is one of...
Read preview Overview
The Once and Future King? Exclusive: 'I Have to Get Back to My Country,' the Afghan Monarch Says
Sitting in his villa outside of Rome, Afghanistan's exiled king, Zahir Shah, 86, told NEWSWEEK's Lally Weymouth in an exclusive interview that he is eager to return to the land of his birth. Ousted from power in 1973 after a 40-year rule, Zahir Shah...
Read preview Overview
Unmasking Bioterror
Martin Quintino figures he's ready. On the day after the atrocities of Sept. 11, the 22-year-old Miami salesclerk bought one gas mask, one chemical bodysuit, a pair of camouflage gloves and an airtight hood that seals off the head and neck, all for...
Read preview Overview
'We'll Pull Through'
Sitting in her darkened Bronx apartment, watching a video of her missing father salsa dancing, Michelle Nieves is grieving--and thinking about money. Her father, Juan Nieves, a 56-year-old Puerto Rican immigrant, worked as a salad maker at Windows...
Read preview Overview
Where the Money's Going
Donations for Sept. 11 disaster relief are soaring toward $1 billion, an outpouring that dwarfs contributions after other national disasters. But where will it all go? Daniel Borochoff, president of the American Institute of Philanthropy, says, "I'm...
Read preview Overview