Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 16

A New Way to Compute: NETWORKS: One Day 'The Grid' Could Be a Kind of Invisible, Universal Translator for Computers across the Globe. but Privacy Critics Say It Has a Dark Side
Byline: Rana Foroohar Tokyo at rush hour, circa 2012: your automated car whisks you off to Narita airport, steering itself through bustling traffic. You're free to work. Push a button on your watch, and an image of your firm's mining operation in...
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Bonds for Beginners
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn For investors, it's far too late for the markets to say "I'm sorry." You've lived through the second worst summer on record (the summer of '74 beat all). Right after Labor Day, the runs on equities began again. Since the...
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Exclusive: The Informant Who Lived with the Hijackers
Byline: Michael Isikoff with Jamie Reno At first, FBI director Bob Mueller insisted there was nothing the bureau could have done to penetrate the 9-11 plot. That account has been modified over time--and now may change again. NEWSWEEK has learned...
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Fall Arts Preview: Movies
The Hours The film opens with Virginia Woolf (Nicole Kidman, plus nose) weighing her coat down with stones and wading into a river with no intention of going for a swim. Yes, "Billy Elliot" director Stephen Daldry is diving into dark waters here,...
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Fall Arts Preview: Music
Santana, 'Shaman' The success of Santana's 1999 album, "Supernatural," was nothing short of a miracle. Since when does an aging rocker's comeback album knock Jay-Z off the charts, sell 25 million copies worldwide and become the sixth highest-selling...
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Fall Arts Preview: The Stage
Movin' Out Twyla Tharp has always had a thing for pop music. She made her name as a choreographer creating dances to the Beach Boys and jazz. Now she's trying her hand--or would that be foot?--with the bard of Hicksville, Billy Joel. "Movin' Out"...
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Falling for Falco: Edie's on Broadway and Back with 'The Sopranos.' A Candid Talk with the Actress-And a Guide to All That Autumn Has to Offer
Byline: Jeff Giles The Broadway revival of "Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune" has received such warm reviews and sold so many tickets that no one could plausibly argue that the production is cursed. Still, there has been weirdness. On the...
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How Safe Are Our Youngest Athletes?
Byline: --David Noonan The death last week from a head injury of Taylor Davison, a 10-year-old girl from Bartlett, Ill., who collapsed during football practice, raised a host of fears and questions for parents and coaches. Is tackle football too...
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How to See the Glass Half Full: In a Bold New Book, the Author of 'Learned Optimism' Offers Life Lessons in Love, Work and Raising Children
Byline: Martin E.P. Seligman Shortcuts to happiness often turn out to be detours. For most people, lasting satisfaction comes not from money, status or fleeting pleasure but from rising to the challenges of love, work and raising children. Here,...
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If Our Son Is Happy, What Else Matters? We Think It's Obvious That Sasha Is Better off with Us Than in an Orphanage. Not Everyone Agrees
Byline: Scott Sherman My son had a spate of bad falls. His black eye and leg cast made him look like he escaped a car crash, but just barely. People asked at every turn, "What happened to him?" The honest answer would have been "What didn't happen...
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Iraq around the Clock: As the Fight for Congress Heats Up, the White House Wants to Talk about Guns, the Democrats Butter. the Winner of That Tug-of-War May Wind Up King of the Hill
Byline: Howard Fineman Tom Daschle's Capitol conference room was jammed with reporters who wanted to question him about Iraq. But he insisted on starting "dugout" (his daily dose of inside baseball) with something much closer to home: the killer...
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Jack Is Paying for This: But Not Much Else, Says a Suit from His Soon-to-Be Ex
Byline: Daniel Mcginn and Geoffrey Gagnon Graef Crystal has spent years digging through chief executives' pay packages, drawing attention to excess and vulgarity. The former compensation consult-ant turned pay critic thought he'd seen it all--until...
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Laddie Come Lately: Has Maxim's Babes-and-Beer Formula Finally Grown Old?
Byline: Seth Mnookin Ed Needham, Rolling Stone's newly installed managing editor, seems nervous. He's sitting in his office, meeting with the magazine's music editors to discuss the week's lineup. Needham's the type of guy who knows enough about...
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Marketing to the Elder Set: DEMOGRAPHICS: The Population Is Getting Older. It's a Remarkable Opportunity for Innovation
Byline: Stefan Theil Imagine this scene in the ginza shopping district of Tokyo just 10 years from now: in a street once dominated by electronics dealers and toy stores, a new business is opening its doors. Signs in bold lettering are advertising...
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More Sweat, More Fiber: Get Ready for New Rules about Diet and Exercise
Byline: Anne Underwood Feeling guilty about not getting the half hour of daily exercise the surgeon general recommends? Now you can feel twice as guilty. Last week the Institute of Medicine, a division of the National Academy of Sciences, upped...
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Newsmakers
Kelly, Kelly, Kelly Did anyone really think Kelly Clarkson wouldn't win "American Idol"? Now that she's the latest reality TV insta-celebrity, she's going to be everywhere. On Sept. 11, Clarkson will sing the national anthem at the Lincoln Memorial....
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On Guard, a Year Later: Since Terror Struck, We've Made Significant Strides in Securing the Airways. but the Price of Protection Is Steep, and There Are Still Too Many Holes in the Safety Net
Byline: Steven Brill The problem with grading how the government has done in protecting us since September 11, Homeland Security Director Tom Ridge told me last winter, "is that the only thing people will ever really notice is failure." Step by...
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Perspectives
Byline: From top to bottom, left to right: The Associated Press (2), The New York Times, The Associated Press, The "Today" Show, The Associated Press, Reuters, Bureau Reports, Reuters (2), The Associated Press, virginmegamagazine.com "It will open...
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Politics and the 'Ideopolis'
Byline: George F. Will In this autumn's elections, a tendency is in tension with a rarity. The party holding the presidency has lost House seats in 32 of the 34 off-year (non- presidential) elections since the Civil War. So the Republicans' majority...
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Pondering the Future's Future: VISIONS: It Used to Be That One Einstein Could Change the Course of Science and Technology. Now, in the Age of the Internet, Innovation Has Become Routinized by a Global Entrepreneurial Culture. Are the Days of the Lone Genius Long Gone?
Byline: Fred Guterl He changed the future without ever winning an election or commanding an army. All Albert Einstein did was have an idea. It's not a particularly easy one to grasp in all its ramifications, but the basic insight he expressed in...
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Powell's Battle: He's a Soldier and a Strong Politician, but He's Up against a Juggernaut. Can a Consummate Nice Guy Win in Washington?
Byline: Michael Hirsh Colin L. Powell, the benign face of American power, leaned close to the four orphans sitting at his feet in a sun-dappled schoolyard, a small oasis in war-ravaged Angola. "Do you know who I am?" he asked, a mischievous twinkle...
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Rumsfeld's War: Smart and Tough, Don Rumsfeld Wants to Take the Fight to Iraq. the Hawk Who's Battling for Bush's Soul
Byline: Evan Thomas "Leaning forward" is one of Donald Rumsfeld's favorite expressions. An old cold-war term, familiar to soldiers and spies, it means the willingness to be aggressive, to take risks. "I want every one of you to know how forward-leaning...
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Scandal: Still Going
Byline: Michael Isikoff A long-running federal probe into President Bill Clinton's last-minute pardon of fugitive financier Marc Rich may be heating up. The politically sensitive investigation hasn't received any public attention for some time....
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So Predictably Unpredictable: CULTURE: It Once Was the Stuff of Best Sellers and Worthy of White House Attention. but the Subject of Futurology Has Fallen on Hard Times. Is It Time for a Comeback?
Byline: Adam Piore It's half past 10 on a Monday morning, and the audience in the Loews Regency Ballroom B is hanging on the words of a lanky man with a bushy white beard and a floral print tie. "Racism will be a quaint bit of history," the speaker,...
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Stop the Babel over Babylon
Byline: Fareed Zakaria President George W. Bush's speech to the United Nations could not come at a better time. He needs to sell his policy on Iraq to the world. But first it needs to be clear what that policy is. I, for one, am pretty confused....
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Technology: TV Thin Is Definitely In
Byline: N'Gai Croal Is your TV set ready for the future? The explosive growth in DVD and home-theater setups, coupled with the slow-but-steady increase in high-definition television programming, is prompting many couch potatoes to consider trading...
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The Editor's Desk
Byline: --Mark Whitaker How smart does George W. Bush have to be? Remember that debate during the 2000 election? Supporters said he only had to be shrewd enough to run a "CEO presidency"--to appoint strong advisers, lay out a vision and delegate...
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The Science of Happiness: We've Tried Health, Wealth and Prozac, but Still We Are Not Contented. Can a Different Approach to Psychology Lead Us to the Good Life? A New Book Makes the Case
Byline: Geoffrey Cowley If good lives were built on good fortune, Jacqueline Gavagan would have reason to despair. All was well when she got out of bed last September 11. She had a loving husband and a satisfying profession as speech pathologist....
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Today's Lesson: Risk and Greed
Byline: Allan Sloan Now that the school year has started, it's time to answer that ageless teacher-getting-to-know-you question: what did I do on my summer vacation? I watched the world go by, and it struck me that even though endless gloom has...
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Trying to Look at Both Sides Now
Byline: Karen Lowry Miller What do bowling leagues have to do with the price of oil? At Shell, they're just as important as Mideast politics and new gas reserves. Every three years, a team of scenario planners at the oil giant peers 20 years into...
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What We Face: The Bottom Line: Saddam Is Years from Getting an A-Bomb, but May Have an Arsenal of Chemical and Biological Weapons. and He's Already Proved That He's Willing to Use Them
Byline: John Barry It is the question of the moment: should the United States invade Iraq and oust Saddam Hussein? President George W. Bush urgently argues Saddam is a madman in possession of a massive stockpile of chemical and biological weapons--an...
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