Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 24

Architecture: A Kool New Library
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan Remember the fuss a few years back when San Francisco opened a new main library and everyone griped, "Where are the books?" (There were still books--though some 100,000 had been dumped in a landfill.) The boom in info...
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A Shocking Diagnosis; Do Chemo and Dating Mix? for Younger Women, Breast Cancer Brings Unique Physical and Emotional Challenges
Byline: Claudia Kalb In a Philadelphia hotel, hundreds of twenty- and thirtysomething women sip coffee and swap e-mail addresses. They are a vibrant, confident, upbeat group. But here and there you glimpse a bald head or sunken eyes. And you are...
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At the Head of Her Class; Hollywood Has Plenty of Teen Starlets. but Jena Malone's Got Something the Other Girls May Not Have: A Future
Byline: Devin Gordon Jena Malone is doing everything wrong. Teenage starlets--like, say, Hilary Duff or Lindsay Lohan or the two-headed Olsen monster--are expected to behave a certain way. They're supposed to dress skimpily, party recklessly, canoodle...
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Civil Rights: 'We Owe It to Emmett'
Byline: Elise Soukup It's a story that has haunted the country for nearly 50 years. In 1955, Emmett Till, a 14-year-old black teenager from Chicago, was kidnapped and brutally murdered after whistling at a white woman while visiting Mississippi....
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Fallujah: In the Hands of Insurgents; One of the Gunmen Wears a Suicide Belt. over Tea and Kebabs, They Explain Why They're Waging Their Jihad
Byline: Joshua Hammer Fidgeting with a pistol as he sits on a Persian carpet, a young mujahed named Mohammed describes his life as a member of the armed resistance. "I fought for four straight days without sleep," he says, recalling the fierce battle...
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Fast-Food Lovers, Unite! Meet Some 'Heavy Users.' They Eat Lots of Burgers and Fries, but They're Not Stupid or Fat, and They're Tired of Being Picked On
Byline: Jennifer Ordonez Big Macs. Nacho-cheese Chalupas. Subway subs. Rob Borucki adores them all. The 37-year-old indulges in fast-food fare at least five times a week. A really good day for Borucki? When Wienerschnitzel, a West Coast hot-dog...
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In the Name of the Father; Actor-Director Melvin Van Peebles Fought Hollywood and Inspired Black Audiences, as Well as His Son Mario, Who Plays Him like a 'Baadasssss!'
Byline: Allison Samuels Mario Van Peebles is a man with an identity crisis. Deep in thought as he sits by the pool at the W hotel in Los Angeles, the handsome character actor is getting those quizzical "aren't you somebody?" stares from sunbathers....
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Medicare's in Good Health; Will Future Workers Accept Higher Taxes to Buy Their Grannies Insulin? or Will They Say, 'Let Her Rot'? (I'm Betting on the Grannies Here.)
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn, Reporting Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld The way the pessimists talk, you'd think that America couldn't afford the future. Exhibit A is medical care for baby boomers. As they age they'll supposedly break the bank. By 2050,...
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Newsmakers
Byline: Marc Peyser, Sean Smith, Lorraine Ali Another Diva by Design Beyonce Knowles is finally becoming a real music star. Sure, she's sold 14 million albums in the United States alone, but no one takes a singer seriously anymore until she's...
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No Security, No Democracy; Power Is Slowly Shifting to Iraqi Leaders on the Ground with Men and Arms. Politics Abhors a Vacuum, and in Iraq, Local Militias Are Filling It
Byline: Fareed Zakaria, Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com. Larry Diamond is not going back to Iraq. One of America's foremost experts on building democracy--a man who has spent years studying and helping countries from Asia to South...
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Perspectives
Publisher correction: 03 June 2004 On our May 24 Perspectives page, we ran a quote implying that The Boston Globe had been "duped" into running graphic photos showing alleged sexual abuse of female Iraqi prisoners by U.S. soldiers. The photos actually...
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Politics: The Struggle to Shape Kerry's Story
Byline: Susannah Meadows Renowned documentary filmmaker George Butler, whose "Pumping Iron" made Arnold Schwarzenegger a star, is now turning to John Kerry's story. A longtime friend, Butler is armed with 6,000 photographs of Kerry taken over a...
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Prison Scandal: Brooklyn's Version of Abu Ghraib?
Byline: Michael Isikoff Even as the Pentagon seeks to quell the furor over Abu Ghraib, the Justice Department is trying to make sure a similar scandal doesn't erupt closer to home. At issue: more than 300 hours of secret videotapes from a U.S. prison...
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Quitting Time; Companies Are Hiring Again, and Guess Who's Applying? Burned-Out Workers Who Already Have Jobs but Are Looking for a Fresh Start
Byline: Daniel McGinn Come along, folks, for a journey into the jungle of the American workplace. Today we're hunting an elusive creature, one that was quite common five years ago but has rarely been seen in recent times. You may recognize him by...
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Religion: Apocalyptic Politics; Ties That Bind: Bush and LaHaye Have a History, and Share a Sense of Mission
Byline: Howard Fineman In 1974 an obscure 40-year-old Baptist minister from Lynchburg, Va., traveled to California to preach in the church of a popular pastor, the author of a Christian best seller about how faith builds character. But when Jerry...
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Religion: The Pop Prophets; Faith and Fiction: Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins Are an Unlikely Team with a Shared Evangelical Fervor-And America's Best-Selling Writers
Byline: David Gates, With David J. Jefferson and Anne Underwood This photo shoot isn't going so well. Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins, coauthors of the best-selling "Left Behind" series of apocalyptic Christian novels, get to see each other only...
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Revelation Revealed; beyond Fear: The Bible's Last Book Is Both Terrifying and Beautiful. but It Ends with a Message of Hope
Byline: Lisa Miller, With Anne Underwood One day, sometime around A.D. 90, a man named John climbed the spiny ridge that runs across the small Aegean island of Patmos. There, as legend has it, he found a cave, crawled inside and had a vision that...
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Snap Judgement: Music
Byline: Lorraine Ali, Bret Begun Baptism Lenny Kravitz "I don't want to be a star, just want my Chevy and an old guitar," croons Kravitz on his gazillionth album, but the singer clearly wants to be Prince--or even better, James Brown. Consider...
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Technology: Your Next Videogame
Byline: N'Gai Croal The buzz at last week's Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles was more electronic than entertainment, thanks to a pair of dueling handheld videogame systems from industry giants Sony and Nintendo. First, Sony Computer...
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Terrorism: A New Face of Evil
Byline: Mark Hosenball He's not yet a household name like Osama bin Laden. But if the CIA and foreign intelligence agencies are correct, Jordanian terrorist Abu Mussab al-Zarqawi is probably the most dangerous and effective Islamic terrorist at...
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That Little Freckle Could Be a Time Bomb; It Took Four Cancer Scares for Me to Realize That Skin Care Is More Than Covering My Face When I Sunbathe
Byline: Susan T. Lennon, Lennon lives in Rocky Hill, Conn. Perched on the edge of the examination table, I was chattering away to my dermatologist, Dr. Penny Lowenstein, as she examined my skin last December. Uncharacteristically quiet, she pulled...
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The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham Tim Lahaye and Jerry Jenkins are not exactly household names in New York City, where much of the national press lives and works. Given the cultural influence these two men have over a huge part of the country, however, they should...
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The Not-So-Mean Street; This Slacker MC from the U.K. Is an Underdog Everyman-A British Slim Shady without the Snarl
Byline: Lorraine Ali Unlike 50 cent or Eminem, the British rapper called The Streets would rather rhyme about lazing on his girl's sofa than drinking magnums of Cristal or killing his mum. He raps about the dull buzz of everyday life with candor,...
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The Political Fallout: Bush's New War Plan; as Bush's Job-Approval Numbers Hit a New Low, He's Turning to His Wife to Help Him Make the Case for His Re-Election
Byline: Howard Fineman, With Tamara Lipper, T. Trent Gegax and Richard Wolffe Laura Welch Bush is shy. In 26 years of marriage to George W. Bush, she has been balance wheel and panic button in private, never a comfortable public figure in the manner...
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The Politics of Trash Talk; Both Candidates Speak with Studied Irrelevance. President Bush Recently Said, 'Most of Fallujah Is Returning to Normal.' That's Good. or Is It?
Byline: George F. Will Although David Hume was a skeptic regarding religion, he frequently attended church services conducted by a severely orthodox clergyman. Hume said, "I don't believe all he says, but he does, and once a week I like to hear...
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The Roots of Torture; the Road to Abu Ghraib Began after 9/11, When Washington Wrote New Rules to Fight a New Kind of War. A NEWSWEEK Investigation
Byline: John Barry, Michael Hirsh and Michael Isikoff, With Mark Hosenball and Roy Gutman in Washington, T. Trent Gegax and Julie Scelfo in New York and Melinda Liu, Rod Nordland and Babak Dehghanpisheh in Baghdad It's not easy to get a member of...
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The 'Will & Grace' Effect; with Massachusetts Leading the Way, Gay Marriage Is Slowly Becoming a Reality-And Dividing Generations
Byline: Debra Rosenberg, With Hilary Shenfeld, Dirk Johnson and Ron Depasquale For Richard and Jeanine Benanti, opposing same-sex marriage was an easy call. "It's against nature, it's against society and it's against the Bible," says 49-year-old...
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Time to 'Wake Up!'; the King of Jordan Chastises Fellow Arab Leaders, and Warns That If the United States Fails in Iraq, Chaos Will Follow
Byline: Lally Weymouth Last weekend, King Abdullah of Jordan played host to many dignitaries, including U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell, at a meeting of the World Economic Forum held at the Dead Sea. In his hotel suite with his shirt open at...
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Why $2 Gas Isn't the Real Energy Problem; Newsweek's Wall Street Editor on How Trying to Save Pennies a Gallon Is a Craze You Should Drive Right Past
Publisher correction: 03 June 2004 In "Why $2 Gas Isn't the Real Energy Problem" (May 24) we said that the size of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve is 660 billion barrels. It is actually 660 million barrels. NEWSWEEK regrets the error. _______________...
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