Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 14

Barry Hot; at Long Last, Manilow Plays Vegas. Isn't It Time We Gave the Man Some Respect?
Byline: Lorraine Ali The first time Barry Manilow played Carnegie Hall was in 1972, as pianist for the burgeoning cabaret star Bette Midler. It was quite a step up from the gay bathhouses they'd been playing to pay the rent. "I remember standing...
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Bush's Big Bet: Risking His Capital; He Got the Ball Rolling at the State of the Union. but It's No Ordinary Fight. on Trial: America's Core Belief in the Social Contract, and Its Faith in the Private Sector
***** CORRECTION: Bush's Big Bet: Risking His Capital" (Feb. 14) quoted Sen. Kent Conrad of North Dakota characterizing his conversation with President Bush aboard Air Force One. In fact, the quote was from a source close to Conrad, not the senator,...
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Courtship for Dummies; in This Comedy, Will's a Charmer. So What's the Hitch?
Byline: David Ansen Will Smith has spent the better part of his extremely successful career charming the pants off movie audiences. Until "Hitch," however, he's never gotten to charm the pants off a leading lady. This is his first flat-out romantic...
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Democracy: Pharaoh's Long Shadow; Will Bush Really Stand by Arab Democrats? Egypt Just Jailed a Leading Reformer, and Is Now a Test Case
Byline: Christopher Dickey (With Kevin Peraino in Amman) Just a few days ago, Egypt looked as if it might be edging toward greater economic, social and political freedoms--no mean achievement in a country older than the Sphinx, and just about as...
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FBI Computers: You Don't Have Mail
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Mark Hosenball The FBI's computer woes got even worse last week when bureau officials were forced to shut down a commercial e-mail network used by supervisors, agents and others to communicate with the public. The reason,...
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Hail to the Flip-Flopper; in a Recent Letter to a Civil War Historian, President Bush Wrote, 'Lincoln Set the Goal and Stayed the Course. I Will Do the Same.'
Byline: Fareed Zakaria (Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com.) Last week's elections were a great day for Iraq, for the Middle East, for America and for one American in particular. George W. Bush rightly deserves credit for these elections...
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Harry Reid's 'Roulette'; Members of Congress Are Doing Very Well Indeed under a Plan Comparable to the One President Bush Would Allow All Americans to Participate In
Byline: George Will A century ago, American progressives said they aspired to use Hamiltonian means to achieve Jeffersonian ends. They meant they would wield a strong federal government to promote equality. One of George W. Bush's aims with Social...
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How to Hook the Elusive Phisher
Byline: Steven Levy Ann Chapman thought it was strange that MSN, Microsoft's online service, was asking her to go to a Web site and re-enter her credit-card number. So she mentioned it to her son-in-law. He took the e-mail to his employer: Microsoft....
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Looking for A Few Good Spies; Washington Calls the Iranian MEK a Terrorist Group. but Some Administration Hawks Think Its Members Could Be Useful
Byline: Christopher Dickey, Mark Hosenball and Michael Hirsh (With John Barry and Richard Wolffe) This is a terrorist cult leader? Maryam Rajavi is dressed in a Chanel-style suit with her skirt at midcalf, lilac colored pumps and a matching headscarf....
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Meal Ticket / Museum Dining
Opening this week, the Modern at New York's Museum of Modern Art may be getting all the buzz for its blend of fine dining and fine art. But it's not the first. Visit these museum restaurants and savor the culinary masterpieces. Los Angeles Restaurant...
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Newsmakers
Byline: RAMIN SETOODEH, NICKI GOSTIN, DAVID GATES Eva Mendes She first gained notice in "Training Day," but now the gorgeous Eva Mendes lightens up in the romantic comedy "Hitch." She dished with NEWSWEEK's Nicki Gostin. You were in Will Smith's...
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Perspectives
"As you stand for your own liberty, America stands with you." President George W. Bush, in his State of the Union address, to Iranians living in what he called "the world's primary state sponsor of terror" "You and I, we have both suffered in...
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Pizza: The Slice Man Cometh
Byline: Bret Begun Ed Levine is a native New Yorker. Native New Yorkers tend to eat pizza like this: fold in half the long way, chew, repeat. But Levine, author of a new guidebook, "Pizza: A Slice of Heaven," does not eat pizza according to any...
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Policing Video Voyeurs; the Feds Join the Battle against Perverts with Cameras
Byline: Kathryn Williams In the summer of 2001, Jolene Jang was enjoying an outdoor festival in Seattle when she felt a creepy guy standing close behind her. He was reaching into her backpack. When she confronted him, the man started to run away,...
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President Bush's Goal: 'A Brighter Future'; A White House Official Explains Why the President Is Pushing Ahead with His Plan to Overhaul Social Security
Byline: Allan B. Hubbard (Allan B. Hubbard is assistant to the president for Economic Policy.) Social Security is one of the magnificent governing achievements of the 20th century. Those of us in government have a moral obligation to preserve and...
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Roll over, FDR This Could Work; Bush and His Opponents Could End Up in the Right Place. FDR Is Rolling over in His Grave, but He'll Rest Easy When This New Deal Is Done
Byline: Jonathan Alter Call me Pollyanna. I think the political forces are now properly aligned to accomplish the impossible--to secure the solvency of Social Security for generations while avoiding the phaseout of the program that President Bush's...
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Social Security: A Daring Leap; President Bush Makes His Proposed Private Accounts Sound like the Opportunity of a Lifetime. but the Fine Print Shows They Pose Great Risk for You-And the Nation
Byline: Allan Sloan You've got to give President Bush an A-plus for the way he marketed the Social Security proposals in his State of the Union address last week. "If you've got children in their 20s, as some of us do, the idea of Social Security...
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Staying in the Game; One Day, He Lost the Election. the Next, He Found out His Wife Had Cancer. John Edwards Is Hanging Tough
Byline: Melinda Henneberger I'm ok," former Democratic vice presidential candidate John Edwards says, nodding determinedly, in a tone that makes clear he could be a lot better. It's been three months now since he lost an election one day and found...
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The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker A number of readers have e-mailed me to ask why we did a cover story on Iraqi insurgents last week rather than the Iraqi voters who courageously went to the polls on Jan. 30 in the country's first free election in a generation....
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They Needed to Know the World Cared; We Went to Sri Lanka to Give Medical Aid, but What Mattered Most to Survivors Was That We Showed Up
Byline: Rebecca O'Connor (O'Connor lives in New York City.) When I first saw the horrific images of the Asian tsunami disaster, I was working the night shift at New York-Presbyterian hospital, where I am a pediatric nurse. I felt compelled to do...
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Travel: Hotter Than the Tango
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores Tony Taylor can't seem to get enough of Buenos Aires. He just returned from a trip there in January and already has another--his fifth since 2001--planned for March. The artist and songwriter enthusiastically rattles off...
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What Sistani Wants; He Refuses a New Air Conditioner, Yet His Office Is Internet-Wired. He Wants Women to Take Political Office, but Not to Shake the Hands of Men outside Their Families. He Is Easily the Most Powerful Man in Iraq. Yet He's an Iranian
Byline: Rod Nordland and Babak Dehghanpisheh (With Eve Conant and Michael Hirsh in Washington, Sarah Sennott in London and Maziar Bahari in Tehran) It's interesting that most published accounts describe Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani as a tall, slender...
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Your Retirement: How to Land on Your Feet; Your Golden-Years Lifestyle Depends More and More on Investing Smarts, Luck and Timing. Time to Understand the New Risks, and Develop a Plan to Deal with Them
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn (With Temma Ehrenfeld, Ace Atkins, Jennifer Barrett Ozols, Pat Crowley, Le Datta Grimes, Nadine Joseph, Joan Raymond, Jamie Reno, Hilary Shenfeld, Ken Shulman and Catharine Skipp) Steve Griggs was feeling flush. In a perfect,...
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