Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 151, No. 17, April 28

Adios, Sound Bites & Fat Cats
Byline: Jonathan Alter You couldn't understand Obama's race speech in 10 seconds. And that's how the campaign wanted it. Sure, the ABC News anchors were out of line to eat up nearly half the debate with their snarky questions on flaps and gaffes,...
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A Farmer's Labor of Love
Byline: Lisa Kerschner; Kerschner Lives In Cochranville, Pa. My work offers little pay and no vacation. But I derive great satisfaction from feeding people. Sweaty, dirty, hot and tired. Those are the words that describe how I feel on a typical...
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A Maverick, but He's No Moderate
Byline: Sarah Kliff And Holly Bailey Half of the survey respondents said they did not know McCain's position on abortion. John McCain boasts one of the most consistent pro-life voting records in the Senate, but he doesn't do much boasting about...
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An Upside to A 'Bad Actor'
Byline: Mark Hosenball Against a backdrop of congressional testimony by Gen. David Petraeus and Ambassador Ryan Crocker, the two top U.S. officials in Baghdad, the Bush administration has stepped up its claims of Iranian interference in Iraq, suggesting...
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Campaigns Get Personal
Byline: Steven Levy Microtargeters know all about you, and try to push your personal hot button so you'll cast your vote for their candidate. Well before the party conventions, it's fair to say that technology has made its mark on the 2008 election...
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Destination Martyrdom
Byline: Kevin Peraino What drove so many Libyans to volunteer as suicide bombers for the war in Iraq? A visit to their hometown--the dead-end city of Darnah. Even before he vanished, Abd Al-Salam Bin-Ali was an easy young man to miss. Pale, lanky...
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Doctors Who Kill Themselves
Byline: David Noonan Every Year, Between 300 And 400 Doctors Take Their Own Lives--Roughly One A Day. No Other Profession Has A Higher Suicide Rate. I've met a lot of doctors over the years. I've interviewed them, watched them operate, observed...
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Endless Summer
Byline: David Ansen Every movie eventually fades to black. But very few of them know how to give audiences a grand finale. When was the last time you walked out of a movie theater and thought: Wow, what a great ending! It's an all-too-rare experience....
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Hard Times Mean Hard Thinking
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn; Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld You'll almost certainly lose if you try to buy and sell as the market churns up and down. Once again, stocks plunged just when investors were starting to feel fat and happy. Once...
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In the Valley of the Dolls
Byline: Jessica Bennett There was a three year period during my adolescence when Jessica and Elizabeth Wakefield, the heart-stealing twins of Francine Pascal's "Sweet Valley High" series, were, like, my best friends and biggest idols. I'd curl up...
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Kennedy's New Frontier
Byline: Peter Plagens The main family business may be politics, but Robert's boy Chris is the art world's new favorite son. Chris Kennedy is one of those Kennedys. You see it when you look at him--that shock of hair, those prominent teeth. You...
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Look at the Alternatives
Byline: Lally Weymouth Colombia's president speaks out on the House's rejection of the U.S.-Colombia free-trade agreement. President Alvaro Uribe of Colombia is in a tight spot. As a staunch U.S. ally against terrorism and drug trafficking, he...
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Murdoch, Ink
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts With a redesigned Wall Street Journal, mogul Rupert Murdoch is launching an old-fashioned newspaper war against The New York Times. Not since William Randolph Hearst took on Joseph Pulitzer have we seen such a fight. ...
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New Target: An Old Dam
Byline: Ron Moreau And Sami Yousafzai; And In many ways, The Kajaki Dam is a symbol of Afghanistan's troubled history. Built by the United States in the 1950s, it fell into disrepair under the Taliban. Now the United States is trying to rebuild...
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Newton in the Batter's Box
Byline: Sharon Begley Fans argue endlessly over whether a fastball or a curve is more likely to be walloped for a home run. Isaac Newton wouldn't seem to have much in common with Derek Jeter. But in one respect the Yankee has lived up to the...
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No Joke: Mr. Izzard Wants Your Vote
Byline: Brian Braiker Americans who know Eddie Izzard only as Wayne Mollow from FX's "The Riches" are about to see a lot more of him. This month he takes his new stand-up act, "Stripped," on the road. He also just finished shooting "Valkyrie," starring...
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Obama: Can't 'Swift Boat' Me
Byline: Mark Hosenball And Michael Isikoff; And The Obama campaign is planning to expand its research and rapid-response team in order to repel attacks it anticipates over his ties to 1960s radical Bill Ayers, indicted developer Antoin Rezko and...
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Once upon A Principle
Byline: Anna Quindlen There was a time when John McCain had positions. Then he ran for president, and everything was suddenly up for grabs. Barack Obama morphed in the public mind from populist to elitist with one ill-wrought comment about guns...
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Pause for Laughter
Byline: Holly Bailey On the bus, John McCain is a Straight Talkin' raconteur. On the stump ... well, he's working on it. John McCain is a born storyteller. Riding in the back of his Straight Talk Express, his suit jacket off and Ray-Bans on,...
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Perspectives
"I am deeply ashamed, and we will do what is possible so this cannot happen again in the future." Pope Benedict XVI, addressing the clergy sex-abuse scandal that has cost the church more than $2 billion and devastated the United States' Roman Catholic...
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Recession and Retirement
Byline: Linda Stern A sinking stock market can drag a good retirement down with it. TIP SHEET's Linda Stern asked Michael Kitces, director of financial planning at Pinnacle Advisory Group in Columbia, Md., how new retirees can protect their spending...
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Rivers Running Dry
Byline: Jeneen Interlandi A water crisis is impending. In a new book, Jeffrey Sachs outlines easy, low-cost ways to avoid disaster. Remember last fall when the city of Atlanta was said to be just weeks away from running dry? It's getting warm...
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Snapshots of Horror
Byline: Christopher Dickey The curiously human side of the inhumanity that was Abu Ghraib "When you see a picture, you don't see outside the frame," one of the American soldiers convicted for dereliction of duty at Abu Ghraib Prison told filmmaker...
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The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham Last September, American-led troops discovered a trove of documents in an insurgent headquarters in the northern Iraqi town of Sinjar. The papers cataloged 606 militants who had come to Iraq from abroad. The largest number were...
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The Election According to Karl Rove
Byline: Karl Rove Polls show voters have such strong feelings about Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama that the election map could change greatly depending on which one of them eventually goes up against John McCain. States that voted Republican in...
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The Feminine Mistakes
Byline: Jennie Yabroff Tired of the mommy wars? Perhaps we should start blaming our mothers instead of our kids. For her new book, "Opting In: Having a Child Without Yourself," writer Amy Richards takes on what could be called the mommy-industrial...
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The Great Shopping Spree, R.I.P
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson For two decades, it's been driven by rising debt levels. At the end of 2007, household borrowing was a dizzying $14 trillion. Transfixed by turmoil in the financial markets, we may be missing the year's biggest economic...
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The Virtues of A Stiff G&T
Byline: Julia Reed The first gin was made by a Dutch professor of medicine who promoted it as a diuretic. As the weather warms, we are getting close to what some people like to call "G&T weather." Now, most of the folks who use this phrase...
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To Argue or Not to Argue
We were built to debate, not decide, in search of a 'more perfect union.' Growing up the son of a senator, Evan Bayh attended Washington's elite, Gothic-spired prep school for boys. Even so (or maybe because of that) he treasured summer trips back...
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What Hillary's Got in Her Back Pocket
Byline: Karen Breslau ***** In our April 28 Periscope interview with Hillary Clinton, the senator identified Helen Clark as the "former" prime minister of New Zealand ("What Hillary's Got in Her Back Pocket"). Clark is, in fact, the current prime...
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White Milk in His Veins
Byline: Brian Braiker Like most glam-rock gods, White Gold loves the white stuff. No, not the Bolivian marching powder--this guy gets high on milk. The dude drinks it mid-shred, right out of his transparent guitar. If you've never heard of White...
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