Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 129, No. 16, April 21

A Mysterious Mission
Why did young Captain Button fly into oblivion? CAPT. CRAIG BUTTON WAS EXCITED about unloading his first real bomb. Flying is going well ... I'll be dropping live bombs (500-pounders) this week," he wrote his landlords, Rozetta and Ben Pingenot....
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A Word on 'Standing.' the Purity of the Accuser Doesn't Determine the Validity of the Charge
The purity of the accuser doesn't determine the validity of the charge THE UNACKNOWLEDGED BUT EVER-PRESENT ISSUE in our politics these days is standing. I don't mean standing to sue, which is the legal version. I mean standing to speak, or, more...
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Badlands: An Ancient Land on the Dakota Prairies
an ancient land on the Dakota prairies Deep canyons and spires caused by erosion, Dakota prairie grassland, 37-million-year-old animal fossils and the final "Ghost Dance" of the Oglala Sioux--signatures of Badlands National Park. This ancient...
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Blue Ridge Parkway: Ambling through the Appalachians
ambling through the Appalachians The first thing you should know about the Blue Ridge Parkway is that there are no tolls. Tourists should also be aware that the speed limit is a leisurely 45 miles per hour. There is no need to rush--so much to see,...
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California Dreamer: The U.S. Proved It Belonged at the '94 World Cup. Can a New American Coach Make the Grade in '98?
The U.S. proved it belonged at the '94 World Cup. Can a new American coach make the grade in '98? IT WAS A SUNDAY AFTERNOON IN January, and most of sporting America was watching the NFL championship games. But Steve Sampson rounded up the U.S. national...
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Digital Divide: Titans Are Clashing for Control of High-Tech TV. the Picture They'll Deliver Will Be Crystal Clear - but the Future of the Tube Is Anything But
Titans are clashing for control of high-tech TV. The picture they'll deliver will be crystal clear--but the future of the tube is anything but. DO BELIEVE THE HYPE! WHEN IT comes to digital television, the revolutionary new offering now on the communications...
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Easing the Byte
Now, a real innovation: PCs under $1,000 LET'S IMAGINE YOU'VE JUST BOUGHT the souped-up speedster of your dreams: a fully loaded PC that set you back $2,500. You've got Pentium power, enough gigs of hard drive to store the Modern Library and a turbocharged...
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Frederick Douglass Home: Cedar Hill and the Anacostia sage(Washington, D.C.)(Special Advertising Section: The National Park System)
Cedar Hill and the Anacostia Sage The unpretentious yet dominating home, on the heights above the Anacostia River, provided its owner with a commanding view of the U.S. Capitol and the city of Washington. Its owner was a remarkable self-taught man...
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Gateway: Harmony between Humans, Nature
harmony between humans, nature When Gateway joined its West Coast counterpart, Golden Gate, as the first urban national recreation area 25 years ago, it opened a frontier. It also presented the National Park Service with the challenge of "creating...
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Gender Bend: Hot Boys to Haute Girls
Men's wear's John Bartlett crosses over SINCE HE LAUNCHED HIS FIRST men's wear collection five years ago, John Bartlett has tied antlers to models' heads, crossed Krishnas with club kids and taken the frump out of "Forrest Gump." Last year, while...
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Goodbye, Mobutu?
After more than three decades of support from the West, the African dictator is now friendless and on the verge of fading away NOT SO LONG AGO, the West cared deeply about the southern Zairean province of Shaba. Uranium mined there fueled the A-bombs...
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Grosse Pointe Blank
A professional killer tries to go home again I DON'T THINK WHAT A person does for a living really reflects who he is," argues the dissatisfied Martin Q. Blank (John Cusack) to his shrink Dr. Oatman (Alan Arkin). Though millions of people. no doubt,...
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Happier Days Ahead? the Future of Mind Drugs
THESE ARE HEADY DAYS IN some of the biggest pharmaceutical-research labs in the country. Neuroscientists are finding new ways for anti-depressants to reach the brain s command centers--promising that the next generation of drugs be better targeted...
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How Che Saw Kabila
The revolutionary icon spent time with the rebel leader in 1965--and he wasn't all that impressed IN THE EARLY YEARS OF Laurent Kabila's fight, he received a helping hand from a revolutionary superstar. Ernesto (Che) Guevara, the Argentine insurgent,...
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Hype Springs Eternal: Two Unknown Authors Get $1-Million Plus Deals and Enough Publicity to Justify Them. Maybe
Two unknown authors get $1 mi!lion-plus deals and enough publicity to justify them. Maybe. THE BOOK BUSINESS IS always cranking up the buzz machine for some would-be blockbuster, but this spring is special, even by publishing's normally surreal...
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Is Fat That Bad?
We've been taught that it's dangerous to be overweight. Now some experts claim that fear is overblown. It's not fatness that counts, they say, it's fitness. JOURNALIST LAURA FRASER IS 5 feet 6 and weighs 155 pounds, which means that she's 10 or...
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Lone Star Rising
George W. Bush, the governor of Texas, is taking on taxes and talking tough on values. Sounds like a road map to the White House--if he can prove he's more than just a famous name. DAD WAS ON THE PHONE, FULL OF INTRIGUE AND boyish urgency. "J-10!...
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North Cascades: A Mountain Kingdom in the Wild
a mountain kingdom in the wild Majestic. Breathtaking. How else to describe the North Cascades? Nineteenth-century surveyor Henry Custer came close when he wrote, in 1859, "Nowhere do the mountain masses and peaks present such strange, fantastic...
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Padre Island: Sea and Serenity in the Gulf
sea and serenity in the Gulf It is an 80-mile-long barrier island of sea, sun, legends and Texas-size contrasts right from the git-go. A channel that is impassible separates sound from solitude: that is, South Padre Island--a resort town full...
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Quick Fix: Do Diet Pills Work?
DIETS WEREN'T WORKING for Judy Surace, who desperately wanted to shed pounds for her health, not her vanity. So last July, weighing 188 pounds and facing serious complications from diabetes, she started taking the new obesity drug Redux. Surace has...
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Rudy to World: Drop Dead: New York and the United Nations Battle over Parking Tickets
New York and the United Nations battle over parking tickets IT'S ONE OF THE LONGEST-RUNNING diplomatic disputes of the century: New York versus the rest of the world. Even after the retirement of famously combative mayor Ed Koch and the breakup...
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San Francisco Maritime: Historic Ships and the Golden Gate
Down to the sea in ships, indeed. And what better place to view them than the splendid California setting of scenic San Francisco Bay. A schooner, a square-rigger, two steam-powered tugboats, a scow schooner and a paddlewheel ferry boat grace Hyde...
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So Long 'Dallas,' Hello High Tech
As computers eclipse crude, Texas offers new promise and new perils. AT 26, JOHN CARMACK FACES A problem that confronts few GenXers: what should he do with his extra Ferrari? From his office in the Dallas suburbs, Carmack has made a fortune in computer...
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Starving and Alone: An Isolated Regime Can No Longer Feed Its People
An isolated regime can no longer feed its people THE FIRST THING catherine Bertini noticed was how small the children were. As head of the United Nations' World Food Program, she got unusual access to schools and day-care centers on a recent trip...
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That's Mr. Bassman: Charlie Haden Breaks Down the Barriers
Charlie Haden breaks down the barriers CHARLIE HADEN IS SO LOW-KEY AND friendly, it's hard to see how anyone could be intimidated by him--least of all the most critically lionized rock musician of the decade. But when Haden went into the studio...
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The Best Idea America Ever Had
The National Park System has grown from a handful of western properties, such as the first, Yellowstone--where the U.S. Cavalry protected its resources from poachers--to more than 370 units telling the story of America's natural, cultural and historical...
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The Kids in the Hall: A Composer Who Writes for Small Ears - and Hands
A composer who writes for small ears--and hands WHEN ELLEN TAAFFE ZWILICH was 5 years old, she begged her parents for piano lessons. Since their little girl spent so much time improvising at the keyboard, they agreed. "But then I kept saying, 'This...
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The Lone Gunman
John Cusack is a lovable hit man in 'Grosse Pointe Blank.' A Gen-X icon, he's half as famous as he ought to be but twice as famous as he'd like. THE FOUR SEASONS HOTEL IN Boston is filled with white winter sunlight this afternoon, but John Cusack...
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The Science Wars
How much is research influenced by political and social fashions? An important debate is making scientists re-examine their assumptions of objectivity. SCIENTISTS WORSHIP AT THE shrine of objectivity, but even the pious occasionally lapse. A century...
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Who Is a Whiz Kid? Because My Sons Are Asian-American, People Jump to Conclusions about Their Academic Gifts
Because my sons are Asian-American, people jump to conclusions about their academic gifts SHORTLY AFTER JOINING A NATIONAL MAGAZINE SOME years ago as a writer, I found myself watching in horror as the week's cover story was prepared. The story was...
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