Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 130, No. 8, August 25

A Battle for Neutrality: The Swiss Made Mistakes, but Allegations That We Profited from World War II Are Unfair
The Swiss made mistakes, but allegations that we profited from World War II are unfair RECENT NEWS ABOUT SWITZERLAND AND THE NAZI gold have brought a lot of long-forgotten history back into the public eye. Some of the allegations about Swiss banks...
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A Real Piece of Work: Welfare Reform Is One Year Old and a Huge Success So Far. but Will Business Do Its Part?
Welfare reform is one year old and a huge success so far. But will business do its part? WHAT A DIFFERENCE A year makes. Last summer, conservatives were arguing that an increase ill the minimum wage would absolutely, positively mean fewer jobs....
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Cop Land
Body language: Sly goes soft, Demi gets hard TO JUDGE BY THEIR NEW MOVIES, G.I. Jane and Cop Land, Demi Moore can beat at the hell out of Sylvester Stallone. As Lt. Jordan O'Neil, the first woman permitted to train for the megamacho navy SEALs,...
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Don't Try This at Home; a Media Family Builds Itself a Big Tax Loophole
A media family builds itself a big tax loophole FOR MOST OF US, THE DOG DAYS OF August are hardly the time to think about next April's day of reckoning with the Internal Revenue Service. But for some people, tax season lasts all year. Consider,...
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Drowning in the Desert: In the Navajo Country of Northern Arizona, 11 Vacationing Hikers Perish in a Horrifying and Bizarre Moment
In the Navajo country of northern Arizona, 11 vacationing hikers perish in a horrifying and bizarre moment IT IS A STORY OF PARADOX. IN THE northern reaches of Arizona, the endless vistas draw a procession of adventurers. But on this day, a dozen...
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Europe vs. the Car: Its Cities Weren't Designed for Driving. and Now They're Choking
Its cities weren't designed for driving. And now they' re choking. EVERY TRAVELER TO LONDON knows the story. You alight at Heathrow Airport, hot and bothered from a long flight. Your brains still in New York and your bags are in Nairobi. The line...
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Facing the Lions: Liberals May Carp, but Nina Shea Is Making Christian Persecution Washington's Hottest Cause
Liberals may carp, but Nina Shea is making Christian persecution Washington's hottest cause THE AUDIENCE IS SCANT, MAYBE 25 people, but that doesn't dim Nina Shea's passion. She's recounting the horrors of Vietnamese religious persecution, and her...
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From 'Ashes' to Stardom: Frank McCourt's Tragicomic Tale of Growing Up Poor in Ireland Is the Woebegone Publishing Industry's Cinderella Story of the Decade
Frank McCourt's tragicomic tale of growing up poor in Ireland is the woebegone publishing industry's Cinderella story of the decade FRANK MCCOURT IS NOT WITHOUT sin. But no one could confess with more charm. In the course of defending the accuracy...
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George Wallace
A compelling film about the Alabama governor and how he rose above the politics of racism BACK IN THE '60s, WHEN POLITICS ran to melodrama and a gaudier breed of politician strutted the stage, George Wallace was the villain right-thinking Americans...
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G.I. Jane
Body language: Sly goes soft, Demi gets hard TO JUDGE BY THEIR NEW MOVIES, GI Jane and Cop Land, Demi Moore can beat the hell out of Sylvester Stallone. As Lt. Jordan O'Neil, the first woman permitted to train for the megamacho navy SEALs, Moore...
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Hail, Mary
A growing movement in the Roman Catholic Church wants the pope to proclaim a new, controversial dogma: that Mary is a Co-Redeemer. Will he do it, maybe in time for the millennium? Should he? THIS WEEK A LARGE BOX SHIPPED from California and addressed...
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Labor's Deliverance?
It's a historic strike and a migraine headache. But the UPS walkout may be just the first of many battles to come over higher wages. IMAGINE THE BLUSHING BRIDE-TO-BE, ready for that grand march down the aisle. And completely apoplectic. Will her...
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Lessons from the Big House
An ex-con sells the benefit of his hard-time experience FRANK SWEENEY HAS SPENT 23 OF HIS 53 years in prison, a record that started with a bank robbery at the age of 18 and concluded (so far, anyway) with a harassment conviction. In between, throw...
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Luxury's Mandarin: A Hong Kong Empire Builder Buys Barney's (Dickson Poon's Dickson Concepts LTD Will Buy NY Clothier for $247 Mil and Add It to an Empire Which Includes the UK Chain Harvey Nichols Department Store)
A Hong Kong empire builder buys Barney's DICKSON POON GOT TO MANHATTAN the long way round. His father, a poor refugee from Guangdong, amassed a fortune selling watches in Hong Kong. Like many of the city's gilded youth, the younger Poon was sent...
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Mimic
Bugs on the warpath in a giddy new horror flick MIMIC IS UNDOUBTEDLY THE BEST mutant-cockroach horror thriller ever made. Even granting that there hasn't been much competition, this is intended as a high compliment. Director Guillermo ("Cronos")...
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My Eve, My Mary: I First Loved the Woman Who Sinned, Then the One Who Was Sinless. Together They Bring Us Closer to God
I first loved the woman who sinned, then the one who was sinless. Together they bring us closer to God. RECENTLY, IN TIMES OF PHYSICAL DISTRESS, I HAVE been surprised to hear myself call upon a maternal presence: "Mommy, I hurt. Help me, Mommy."...
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New Freedom in the Sky
IN A DIMLY LIT ROOM INSIDE THE FAA's air-traffic control center on New York's Long Island, dozens of controllers hunch over primitive black and green radar panels. Each controller tracks up to 25 airplanes simultaneously; together they shepherd a total...
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On the Spot: A Jittery Stock Market Tries to Figure out Where Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan Really Stands
A jittery stock market tries to figure out where Fed chairman Alan Greenspan really stands ALAN GREENSPAN DOES HIS BEST thinking in the tub at 5:30 a.m.-- a time when, the Federal Reserve chairman has told friends, his "IQ is about 20 points higher."...
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Our Embattled Ears: Hearing Loss Once Seemed a Normal Part of Aging, but Experts Now Agree That Much of It Is Preventable. How to Protect Yourself
Hearing loss once seemed a normal part of aging, but experts now agree that much of it is preventable. How to protect yourself. CATHY PECK, A MUSICIAN, NEVER thought much about her ears. Sure, she relied on them every day as a bass player and singer/songwriter...
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Red-Faced Rescuers
Mir's unluckiest crew touches down to less than a hero's welcome while repairs to the damaged space station begin--from the inside out IT TAKES ABOUT THREE HOURS IN A Soyuz capsule to get from the Mir space station to the former Soviet republic...
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Rim Shots at History
Does the White House have any idea how its 'historical legacy' obsession is being received? SOMEBODY'S GOING TO HAVE TO RESOLVE THE "historical legacy" question currently so obsessing our leaders before the people rise up and do something reckless....
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The 'Cell from Hell': Pfiesteria Strikes Again - in the Chesapeake Bay
Pfiesteria strikes again--in the Chesapeake Bay IT'S NAMED PFIESTERIA PISCICIDA-- Latin for "fish killer." All too apt. This "cell from hell," as some have dubbed it, has struck in waters from Delaware to Alabama. In North Carolina scientists think...
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The Choice of a New Generation: Rumours of Fleetwood Mac's Demise Have Been Exaggerated
Rumours of Fleetwood Mac's demise have been exaggerated APPARENTLY THE MEMBERS OF Fleetwood Mac are a little confused as to what decade they're in. Stevie Nicks, Christine McVie, Mick Fleetwood, John McVie and Lindsey Buckingham are humming around...
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Truth or Justice: A Confession Could Free the Killers of a Hero
A confession could free the killers of a hero HE COULD JUST AS EASILY HAVE BEEN talking business strategy. Seated before South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission last week, Clive Derby-Lewis explained that in 1998 the African National...
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Unfinished Business
Correspondent's report: Why Europeans don't get the pickup truck. YOU JUST CAN'T FIND A car more purely American than a pickup truck. I don't care where it's made. It's functional, sporty-- why, hell, for a lot of Americans it's a downright spiritual...
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Woman of the Hour
In the UPS strike Labor Secretary Alexis Herman ha a great challenge and opportunity. Is she up to it? WHEN OFFICIALS from UPS and the striking Teamsters announced they would finally return to the bargaining table last week, it wasn't just the folks...
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