Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 155, No. 04, January 25

A Conversation with Google's Chairman and CEO
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Google CEO Eric Schmidt has long defended his company's decision to do business in China despite the restrictions that Beijing imposes on Internet freedom. Nevertheless, last week the company abruptly threatened to pull out...
Read preview Overview
Averting Disaster
Byline: David Rothkopf Calamities like the Haiti quake aren't just predictable--they're preventable. The most shocking thing about the disaster in Haiti was not that it was so sudden, violent, and horrific in its human toll. It's that the damage...
Read preview Overview
China's Silicon Ceiling
Byline: Daniel Gross Free markets require free minds. Google vs. China represents a clash of what may be the two most powerful forces of the first decade of the 21st century. Like China, Google has changed the terms of competition in several...
Read preview Overview
Clash of the Titans
Byline: Fareed Zakaria How the Democratic Republic of Google is testing China's appetite for democracy itself. Google's decision to defy Beijing's rules censoring the Internet could be seen as an isolated event--one company pulling out of China...
Read preview Overview
Coming around on Iran
Byline: Mark Hosenball U.S. intelligence agencies are quietly revising their widely disputed assertion that Iran has no active program to design or build a nuclear bomb. Three U.S. and two foreign counterproliferation officials tell NEWSWEEK that,...
Read preview Overview
It's Not My Fault
Byline: Robert Rosenkranz During a recent appointment to ease a little back pain, my masseuse started criticizing the health-insurance companies. "Isn't it terrible that insurance doesn't cover massage?" she asked. It wasn't the first time I'd heard...
Read preview Overview
Life of the Party
Byline: Howard Fineman Roger Ailes is the real head of the GOP. I've been trying to answer this question: does the Republican Party have a "leader"? Surely it's not Michael Steele, the loose-lipped chairman of the RNC. Not Mitch McConnell, the...
Read preview Overview
'Many Hands Lighten the Load'
Byline: Bill Clinton Helping Haiti helps us all. Haiti suffered the worst catastrophe in its history last week. Given all the nation has been through in the last 200 years, that is saying something. We have all seen the heartbreaking scenes...
Read preview Overview
Must-See TV
Byline: Dahlia Lithwick Make the gay-marriage trial public. There are many ways to frame the gay-marriage trial taking place this week in San Francisco: it's either a piece of Vegas-style showboating by former Bush v. Gore adversaries David Boies...
Read preview Overview
No KSM in NYC?
Byline: Michael Isikoff Top administration officials are getting nervous that they may not be able to proceed with one of their most controversial national-security moves: trying Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and four other accused 9/11 conspirators in...
Read preview Overview
No Rational Exuberance
Byline: George F. Will The underemployment rate is 17.3 percent. One of conservatism's tasks is to discourage irrational exuberance--or any other kind of exuberance, for that matter. Today this task is not demanding because anxiety about the...
Read preview Overview
Out of the Picture
Byline: Jeremy McCarter Today's Oscar contenders should be thankful Gene Hackman's no longer acting. Gene Hackman has quit the movies. That's not a stop-the-presses scoop. At this point, it's hardly news at all, though it's probably news to you....
Read preview Overview
Queen and Working Mother
Byline: Julia Baird Victoria was both dutiful and angry. Queen Victoria loathed being pregnant. She felt more like a pig or cow than a queen, she said, which was unfortunate, given that she had nine children. As several of her relatives had died...
Read preview Overview
Selling South Korea
Byline: B. J. Lee For years now, south Korea has been known internationally for its blazing economy--but not much else. President Lee Myung-bak plans to use the economic crisis to change that. As China rises and the U.S. stagnates, Lee aims to exploit...
Read preview Overview
The Future of the City
Byline: Samuel Palmisano The chairman and chief executive of IBM on the change agents of the 21st century. A few years ago, the world crossed a threshold. For the first time, more than half the human race is living in cities. By 2050 the figure...
Read preview Overview
The Last Mile
Byline: Debra Weiner It's been 250 years since the French and Indian War, when George Washington, a young colonial officer, made his way from the eastern seaboard past the forks of the Ohio River, where Pittsburgh now stands. It was a dangerous...
Read preview Overview
The Last Resort
Byline: Daniel McGinn Will the hotel that has hosted 26 presidents be around to receive Barack Obama? When guests approach the entrance of the Greenbrier Resort, they're usually impressed by the Greek Revival architecture, the 6,500-acre grounds,...
Read preview Overview
The Real Reality TV
Byline: Joshua Alston In the new season premiere of the real-time terrorist thriller 24, Jack Bauer (Kiefer Sutherland) is a former federal agent trying to leave behind his run-and-gun past to spend more time with his family. Just as he's preparing...
Read preview Overview
When Soft Hearts Make Smart Policy
Byline: Jon Meacham The epic Haitian earthquake--secretary of state Hillary Clinton called it "biblical"--brought the woeful island nation back into the American mind. The moment was totally in keeping with past experience: Haiti makes news only...
Read preview Overview
Why God Hates Haiti
Byline: Lisa Miller; With Johannah Cornblatt The frustrating theology of suffering. Haiti is surely a Job among nations. It is the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere: half its population lives on less than a dollar a day. With 98 percent...
Read preview Overview
Why Haiti Matters
Byline: Barack Obama In the tragic aftermath of Haiti's 7.0 earthquake, images of the disaster break our hearts and remind us of the fragility of life. What America must do now--and why. In the last week, we have been deeply moved by the heartbreaking...
Read preview Overview
You Can't Fight the Future
Byline: Daniel Lyons Why China is no match for the Internet. In Silicon Valley the world is divided into two kinds of people--those who "get it," and those who don't. The people who get it are the ones who understand that the Internet is the...
Read preview Overview