Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 156, No. 20, November 15

Another Way to Die
Byline: Steve Tuttle A trip into the heart of Haiti's cholera zone reveals a people armed with both fatalism and fortitude. The sand divers of preval go to work every day in the brown water of the Artibonite River, deep in the rural heart of...
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A Return Engagement for Russia
Byline: Owen Matthews To this day, many Russians can only wish they had never heard of Afghanistan. But two decades after the Soviet Union's humiliating pullout, NATO is working to get Russia back into the country. The plan, championed by NATO Secretary-General...
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Camelot's Conscience
Byline: Louisa Thomas Ted Sorensen was a hero of mine before I knew who he was. Sorensen, who died last week at 82 from complications following a stroke, was the primary speechwriter for John F. Kennedy. He was also an aide, a confidant, an "intellectual...
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Cutting the Mustard, at Last
Byline: Julia Reed Sammy Cahn was clearly not a foodie. His lyrics to "My Kind of Town" give nods to Chicago's many charms and attractions, from the Wrigley Building to "razzmatazz and all that jazz." But not a single word is devoted to the city's...
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For Haiti, No Relief in Sight
After disaster, the world rushed in to help. So why is it taking so long to rebuild? If there is a single essential prerequisite to the reconstruction of Haiti, it's the removal of rubble from the capital city. The Jan. 12 earthquake, which killed...
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Governing without a Net
Byline: Daniel Lyons Obama's online troops are clicked off. What happened to the Netroots? That's what I've been wondering ever since the Republicans routed the Democrats last week. Two years ago, a lot of people--myself included--really believed...
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Greetings from Recoveryland
Byline: Joel Kotkin Where can you go to escape the recession? Try any of these 10 places. Oh, and be prepared to wear red. Like a massive tornado, the Great Recession up-ended the topography of America. But even as vast parts of the country were...
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Humble Pie Eating Contest
Byline: Lisa Miller What it takes to get things done. At a post-election press conference last week, President Barack Obama engaged in some public self-reflection. He felt "bad," he said. The "shellacking" he and his party sustained the night...
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Preserving Parenthood
Byline: Claudia Kalb When Sam Hornikel was 2 years old, he was diagnosed with a fast-growing malignant tumor in his bladder. It was the size of a grapefruit. Within hours, his parents, Erin and Joe, were inundated with complicated information. But...
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Promised Land
Byline: Tony Dokoupil; With Mckay Coppins How Utah became the new economic Zion. It's said there are no bad jobs during a recession. But there are depressing ones--like trying to recruit new business. That was Jeffrey Edwards's task as head of...
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Repeal and Replace?
Byline: Wendell Potter Not so fast. An insurance-company defector explains why the most controversial provision of the health-care law will survive. Conservatives who voted for congressional candidates because they pledged to repeal and replace...
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Rick Perry Is 'Fed Up'
Byline: Andrew Romano On Nov. 15, Rick Perry--who was just reelected governor of Texas after a decade in office--will release Fed Up!, a book calling for a radically limited federal government. An early Tea -Party supporter, Perry insisted last...
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Robert Weissenstein's Exhilaration
Byline: George F. Will Finding fascination in the quotidian. Long ago, in 2008, Americans bought 1.4 billion books made of paper and 200 million e-books. By 2014--perhaps sooner--sales of e-books will equal those of the paper kind. This could...
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Sex, Drugs, and RPGs
Byline: Nisid Hajari Why India can't escape its neighborhood. The most striking new building in Mumbai--the first stop on President Obama's Asia trip--is a gleaming 27-story tower that sits atop ritzy Malabar Hill. What's remarkable about the...
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Stars of the Recession
Byline: Rana Foroohar and R.M. Schneiderman Amid the economic rubble, several industries are standing tall. Here's where the jobs are. In the fall of 2008, roughly nine months into the Great Recession and just before Lehman Brothers collapsed,...
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Tea for Tim
Byline: Zev Chafets He hails from where the civil war began, but this black republican tea party favorite doesn't want to be a leader on race. When the massive Republican freshman class arrives in Washington in January, its members will begin...
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The Do-Lots Congress
Byline: Ezra Klein Guess what--it accomplished big things. The votes are (mostly) counted. The Republicans have clearly and decisively won. But did the Democrats actually lose? They lost the election, certainly. And many of them lost their...
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The First Action Hero
Byline: Malcolm Jones Hollywood mythologized him as 'Lawrence of Arabia,' but the real T. E. Lawrence was bigger than that. In fact, he may have been the original worldwide media celebrity. Early in 1923, the London Daily Express ran a front-page...
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What, Me Worry?
Byline: Jonathan Alter Put away the spitballs. Obama and the newly ascendant Republicans may actually get something done. It's often darkest just before it's -- pitch black. But other times a dim ray of something resembling light can break through....
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