Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 25

A 9, 000-Year-Old Secret; after a Long Legal Battle, Scientists Are Studying an Ancient Skeleton That Could Change Theories about the First Americans
Byline: Jerry Adler (With Juliet Chung) When last heard from, 9,000-year-old Kennewick Man was in federal court, his battered bones the subject of a tug of war between scientists who wanted to study them and Indian tribes who sought to bury them....
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A Deadly Puzzle; Searching for 'Skill-Set Operatives' Who Recruited and Supplied the London Bombers
Byline: Tara Pepper and Mark Hosenball (With Zahid Hussain in Islamabad; Emily Flynn, Carla Power and Stryker McGuire in London; Gameela Ismail and Dan Ephron in Cairo, and Ed Caram in Raleigh, N.C. Graphic by John Sparks and H. Lee Whack Jr.) The...
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A Dream before Dying; Life's Profound Problems Often Get Resolved in the Sleep That Comes before the Final Rest, These Authors Say
Byline: Anne Underwood As a hospice chaplain for 10 years, the Rev. Patricia Bulkley confronted the raw emotions of the dying--their terror at the approaching end, their unresolved family problems, their crises of faith. They were people like Charles...
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Babies Who Take Viagra; the Drug for Men with Sexual-Performance Problems Also Helps Some Kids with a Life-Threatening Disease
Byline: Ben Whitford Bailey Buffalow was 18 months old before she laughed for the first time. Born three months premature, Bailey suffers from pulmonary hypertension, a rare condition in which the artery carrying blood from the heart to the lungs...
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Battle of the Scions? Jesse Jackson Jr. Eyes a Run at Chicago's Mayor
Byline: Dirk Johnson He is not your father's Jesse Jackson. U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., a Chicago Democrat, has never made a habit of seeking media attention. "In 10 years in Congress, I've had probably 15 press conferences," he says. "Dad had...
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Blaise Judja-Sato; A Wharton M.B.A. Brings Basic Health Care to the Poor of Rural Mozambique
Byline: Karen MacGregor and Geoffrey Cowley Five years ago, Blaise Judja-Sato was living a rural African's dream. Born poor in Cameroon, he had worked his way into elite schools and become a prosperous American. At 36, he was living in Seattle and...
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Clowns: The Best Medicine?
Byline: Alexandra Silver You'd expect most aid workers to arrive in Africa with food and antibiotics. But when Jamie Lachman heads there this fall, he'll be packing a ukulele and a horn. In growing numbers, clowns are crossing borders just like...
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Fast Chat: Power in Advertising
Byline: Elise Soukup Forget altruism. According to SmartPower, a three-year-old nonprofit that markets clean energy, weaning our nation off fossil fuels just makes good economic sense. After success in Connecticut--the state committed to having...
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Fighting for Freedom in the Mississippi Sun; in 1964 I Was a 'Freedom Teacher' for One Brief Summer. I Came Home; Others Were Not So Lucky
Byline: Karol Nelson McMahan (McMahan lives in Austin, Texas.) When I looked at the elderly face of Edgar Ray Killen on the news a few weeks ago, the events of 1964 flooded my memory. After 41 years, Killen was convicted in the murders of James...
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Fighting the Good Fight; or Maybe Not So Good. A New FX Drama Series about the Iraq War Deliberately Refuses to Make Up Its Mind
Byline: Marc Peyser Do you know anyone who doesn't have an opinion about the war in Iraq? Anyone who doesn't believe it's either wonderfully noble or tragically foolish? Then you may be surprised by "Over There," a new drama series that debuts July...
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Gary Sinise; an Oscar Nominee Launches a Charity to Stock Schools in War-Torn Iraq
Byline: Devin Gordon When actor Gary Sinise talks about Operation Iraqi Children, the humanitarian organization he cofounded 16 months ago to provide basic supplies to schools in the war-ravaged country, he does not peddle sob stories. He does not...
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Good News: You're Fired; A Rich Payday for Departed Morgan Stanley Executives
Byline: Charles Gasparino (With Nicole L. Joseph) John Mack's return to Morgan Stanley was supposed to be a new beginning. He hoped to put an end to the turmoil and defections of top talent under his predecessor, Phil Purcell, and get everyone at...
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Hot Designer Genes; What If You Put Michael Bay, Director of the Sci-Fi Film 'The Island,' in a Room with a Critic? Would It Be Armageddon?
Byline: David Ansen Along with hundreds of other strangely docile folks in white leisure outfits, Lincoln Six-Echo (Ewan McGregor) and Jordan Two-Delta (Scarlett Johansson) live in an underground, rigidly controlled environment in the not-too-distant...
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Keeping the Robes Clean; the High Court Has Somehow Remained a Bulwark in a Nasty World of Inexorable Lobbying, Anti-Intellectualism and Self-Serving Politicking
Byline: Anna Quindlen The man before the bench looks overwhelmed, standing hip deep in a pile of paper. "Abortion," says one document; "capital punishment," another. Government aid to parochial schools, undeclared war, de facto segregation. The...
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Mergers' New Twist: Divorce Insurance; Ameritrade Is Paying $20,000 for the Possibility of Saving $1 Billion
Byline: Allan Sloan One of Wall Street's major industries is creating new financial products. And now it's come up with a beauty: corporate divorce insurance. Wall Street has always gotten fees for marrying companies, then another set of fees for...
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Newsmakers
Byline: NIcki Gostin, Marc Peyser, David Gates Billy Bob Thornton In the new remake of "The Bad News Bears," Billy Bob Thornton plays the role of the curmudgeonly Coach Buttermaker. He talked about baseball (and his ex-wife) with NEWSWEEK's Nicki...
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Pensions for War Criminals; They're Facing Trial, but They're Not Going Poor
Byline: Rod Nordland (With Zoran Cirjakovic in Belgrade) In the Balkans, war crime pays. This year, a record 20 accused war criminals have been turned over to the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia at The Hague, compared with...
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Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources: Associated Press (2), The Washington Post, New York Times, BBC, New York Times, Associated Press, CNN, Chicago Tribune, Orlando Sentinel "I am not about to announce my retirement." Chief Justice William Rehnquist, ...
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Psst! Wanna Hot Deal? Investors Are Buying Rental Homes in Unlikely Spots like Pocatello, Idaho. Why? Low Prices
Byline: Daniel McGinn Until a few years ago, Judy Peterson, a special-education teacher who lives near Sacramento, Calif., had never heard of Pocatello, Idaho. Nor did Peterson, 59, ever expect to own any real estate aside from her own home. But...
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Rove at War; He Rose Using Tactics His Foes Are Turning against Him. but Never Bet against Karl Rove
Byline: Howard Fineman (With Michael Isikoff, Richard Wolffe and Holly Bailey Graphic By Jessica Silver-Greenberg) Karl Rove is a hunter. His favorite quarry in Texas is quail; in Washington, it's foes of George W. Bush or Vice President Dick Cheney....
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Technology: Dressing Up Your PSP
Byline: N'Gai Croal When Sony first announced the PlayStation Portable ($250; circuitcity.com ) two years ago, gamers thought the company might have a breakthrough hit that would compete with both Apple's iPod and Nintendo's Game Boy. Since its...
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The 'Boomerang' Effect; Three Rappers from Senegal, Bringing It All Back Home
Byline: Lorraine Ali It's 1:30 a.m. inside a small, humid club in Austin, Texas, on the last day of the South by Southwest music festival. The scraggly crowd of indie rockers should be at the bar, desperately sucking down their last drinks. Instead,...
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The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker It was the Spring of 1994, and Howard Fineman was one of the first national reporters to travel to Texas to cover a young candidate for governor named George W. Bush. Howard was also there to see another rising star: Karl...
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The Military: A Move for Clear Rules for Gitmo
Byline: Michael Hirsh John McCain learned about interrogation abuses as a POW in Vietnam. And since the Abu Ghraib Prison scandal broke, the Arizona senator has grown increasingly angry over the Pentagon's failure to state clearly what its rules...
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The Prosecutor: The Mystery Man; Patrick Fitzgerald Has Sent a Reporter to Jail and Pulled Back the Curtain on Top Staffers' Press Chats. Does He Have a Case?
Byline: Jonathan Darman and Michael Isikoff Growing up in Brooklyn, N.Y., in the 1970s, Patrick Fitzgerald was so determined to attend the prestigious Regis High School that even a rejection letter couldn't keep him away. When his carefully prepared...
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The World Is Still Round; Yes, Some Engineering Jobs and Data Centers Have Moved to India and China. More Will Go. but the Process Isn't Endless and Can Be Exaggerated
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson One of the unheralded contrasts of our time is this: everywhere we see the increasingly powerful effects of globalization; and yet, the single most important reality for the economic well-being of most people is their...
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Why the Leak Probe Matters; for All the Complexities of the Valerie Plame Case, This Story Is about How Easy It Was to Get into Iraq, and How Hard It Will Be to Get Out
Byline: Jonathan Alter Like a lot of President Bush's critics, I supported the Iraq war at first. Because of the evidence on Iraq's weapons of mass destruction laid out by Colin Powell, I agreed that we needed to disarm Saddam Hussein. I even think...
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'With Open Arms'; Her Husband May Have His Critics Abroad, but First Lady Laura Bush's Trip Helped Take the Edge Off
Byline: Tamara Lipper It was a small gesture, but one that mattered. As she sat in a Rwandan church last Thursday afternoon, listening to a presentation on the scourge of HIV in Africa, Laura Bush caught the eye of a toddler wandering among the...
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