Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 153, No. 07, February 16

A Novel English Lesson
Byline: Louisa Thomas Yiyun Li left China to become a scientist. So how'd she become one of America's best young novelists? When Yiyun Li was a child in Beijing, in the late 1970s, she watched political prisoners paraded through the streets and...
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A Tough Choice Draws Nearer
Byline: Stuart Taylor Jr President Obama has tried to remain true to his campaign message of bipartisanship. But he's struggled to get everyone else to play along. Congressional Democrats, finally out from under the GOP thumb, want to enjoy their...
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Big Government Is Back-Big Time
Byline: Michael Freedman; With Tracy McNicoll in Paris U.S. policymakers reconsider the relationship between government and the private sector. Have you noticed that Barack Obama sounds more like the president of France every day? When Obama...
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Decline? I'll Decline
Byline: Daniel Gross Our best days aren't necessarily behind us. The dumb, willfully blind optimists who dominated the late boom have been evicted--and the ardent declinists, the bears and the prophetic historians have moved in. They've come...
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Delicious White Whine
Byline: Joshua Alston Mike did 'School of Rock.' Mel worked for Pat Robertson. Now they're an amazing 'Race' team. The hardest part about watching a reality competition show is learning all the contestants' faces. But for the 14th season of "The...
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Divine Refuge in the Storm
Byline: Lisa Miller Applications to seminary and divinity school rise during tough times. After 9/11 and the last down economy, enrollment surged 8 percent. Everyone, it seems, has a "Plan B." You've had the conversation yourself with your spouse...
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From a Catwalk to Knesset
Byline: Kevin Peraino Never mind the two front runners for prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu and Tzipi Livni. Israelis are chattering about Orly Levy, 35, a former fashion model running for Parliament from the state's hard-right Israel Beitenu...
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How Bad Is It, Really?
Byline: Zachary Karabell January's jobless numbers were worse than expected. But statistics only tell part of the story. The report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics was just as dismal as anticipated. Unemployment in January jumped to a 16-year...
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In Defense of Bankers
One obvious point being lost: the vast majority of toilers in the financial vineyards had nothing to do with the meltdown. Not long ago, American culture abhorred lawyers, mistrusted journalists and envied bankers. Today we ignore lawyers, pity...
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One Word: Stagetegery
Will Ferrell brings Bush back--to Broadway. By Jeremy McCarter The squinty eyes, the frat-boy swagger, the barely checked impulse to cram a nerd into a locker: Will Ferrell has brought the glorious details of his Dubya impression to Broadway....
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On Their Own Terms
Byline: Anna Quindlen American women have found a new way to keep abortion a personal and private responsibility. It comes with a glass of water. This is how it works: first, one pill in the doctor's office or at the clinic, and, a day or two...
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Our Nuclear Nightmare
Byline: Henry A. Kissinger As nations like Iran and North Korea seek to develop atomic weapons, the chances of a calamity are rising dramatically. Here's how to lower them. More than 200 years ago, the philosopher Immanuel Kant defined the ultimate...
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Perspectives
"I don't care whether you're driving a hybrid or an SUV. If you're headed for a cliff, you've got to change direction. That's what the American people called for in November, and that's what we intend to deliver." President Barack Obama, urging...
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Sabotaged by the System
Byline: Jesse Ellison When Tyrome Sams turned 18 two years ago, he engaged in a modern rite of passage: he applied for a credit card. Credit wasn't hard to come by then, yet Sams was refused again and again. Eventually he requested a credit report--and...
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Stop Me If You've Heard This One
Don't underestimate the power of storytelling. It got folks through the Depression. It can work now, too. If my grandmother Blanche were around to read the headlines today, I know just what story she would tell: in the mid-1920s, at the height of...
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Terror on the Streets of New York, Take One
Byline: David Wallace-Wells The 20th century closed with a vicious bombing. We've largely forgotten about the one that opened it. One September morning in 1920, a horse-drawn wagon made its way along Wall Street in lower Manhattan, came to a...
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The Bailout Isn't a Morality Play
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Inept bankers may not deserve help, but that's not the point. If the financial sector isn't revived, then the economy will stay depressed. If this were a movie, we'd call it "TARP, The Sequel." The Obama Administration...
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The Curious Case of Ben-No, Max Tivoli
Byline: Jesse Ellison Say you wrote a book. You agonized for years over every word, each character. Say your book did quite well, received glowing reviews from big-shot critics, became a bestseller--and then, four years later, say you start getting...
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The Draw of 'Dead Town'
Byline: Suzanne Smalley and Evan Thomas For many young guys trying to leave gangs, the pull of the old neighborhood is tough to resist. How do you let go--and stay gone? NEWSWEEK trailed two men who really want to figure that out for themselves....
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The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham When Evan Thomas and I started talking about the idea that America has quite recently--and quite quickly--moved closer to Europe in terms of the relationship between the state and the market, we were skeptical. We are Americans,...
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The Inside Game
Byline: Howard Fineman In medieval Washington, no one gets a half-hour solo meeting with a president. But as Barack Obama labored to sell his economic plan last week, he gave three senators, none a household name, the royal treatment. "When I got...
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The Marathon Man
Byline: Jonathan Darman Robert Caro spent decades living LBJ's life. His goal with the last volume is the same as itwas with the first: to endure. What made Johnson run? That was the question that, for several months in the late 1970s, drove...
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The New AG Gets a Test
Byline: Michael Isikoff Despite his clear declaration during his confirmation hearing that "waterboarding" is torture, new Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. has seemed reluctant to order criminal probes into alleged rough treatment of detainees during...
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Three Cheers for Dakota! Turn the Other Cheek, Christian
Dakota Fanning has two movies in theaters: the animated "Coraline" and the superhero action flick "Push." She spoke to Ramin Setoodeh. How does it feel to have two movies opening on the same day? I've never had that before. It's so neat. You're...
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Time to Hang Up the Pajamas
Byline: Daniel Lyons I learned the hard way: while blogs can do many wonderful things, making huge amounts of money isn't one of them. For two years I was obsessed with trying to turn a blog into a business. I posted 10 or 20 items a day to my...
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We Are All Socialists Now
Byline: Jon Meacham and Evan Thomas In many ways our economy already resembles a European one. As boomers age and spending grows, we will become even more French. The interview was nearly over. on the Fox News Channel last Wednesday evening,...
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Why There Won't Be a Revolution
Byline: Jerry Adler; With Raina Kelley Americans might get angry sometimes, but we don't hate the rich. We prefer to laugh at them. The poor you will always have, the good book says, but as for the rich man, he will wither away like a delicate...
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Will the Blackberry Sink the Presidency?
Byline: Sharon Begley; With Holly Bailey and Daniel Stone in Washington and Jeneen Interlandi in New York Distraction, interruption, addiction: there is evidence the iconic handheld can change the way we think. But it all depends on how you use...
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Worst Job in the World
Byline: Lally Weymouth Pakistani Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani insists his country isn't failing, but needs international help. Pakistan's Prime Minister, Yousuf Raza Gilani, leads a fractious Parliament that is facing at once a major economic...
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Worthwhile Canadian Initiative
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Canadian banks are typically leveraged at 18 to 1--compared with U.S. banks at 26 to 1. The legendary editor of The New Republic, Michael Kinsley, once held a "Boring Headline Contest" and decided that the winner was "Worthwhile...
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