Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 2

A Day of Death; for Every Soldier or Marine Who Dies in Iraq, at Least 20 Iraqis Are Killed. Some of Their Stories
Byline: Rod Nordland and Babak Dehghanpisheh (With Salih Mehdi and Ahmed Obeidi in Baghdad) Describing Jalal Mustafa to a reporter, the first thing his family mentions is "that long love story of his." The young mechanic's dream was to wed his fiancee,...
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A Glimmer of Hope
By the third year of the war, the white house focused on turning Iraq into a showcase of Middle Eastern democracy. In the first of three elections in 2005, millions of jubilant Iraqis waved their purple-stained fingers for the cameras--a rare triumphal...
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A New Struggle for Edwards
Byline: Jonathan Darman Early last Friday morning, John Edwards was back at work. A day earlier, the Democratic presidential candidate had shocked the nation with the sad news that his wife, Elizabeth, had suffered a recurrence of breast cancer...
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A Sign of Rising Tensions
Byline: Evan Thomas, Mark Hosenball, John Barry and Michael Hirsh The Iranian navy may be no match for the blue-water fleets of America and Britain, but at a breakfast with reporters last year, Adm. Mike Mullen, the U.S. chief of Naval Operations,...
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A Test for Gonzales
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Richard Wolffe When dispirited Justice Department officials assembled for a senior staff meeting last Tuesday, Attorney General Alberto Gonzales surprised them. "I just got off the phone with the president," he said,...
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Blackstone Is Hiding Its Private Parts
Byline: Allan Sloan What a letdown. Blackstone Group, the giant "private" equity firm, finally filed its going-public documents last week--but left out what Wall Street's financial voyeurs most wanted to see: how much of the firm co-founders Steve...
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Destination Earth
Byline: Devin Gordon Could any TV program sound more boring than an 11-hour nature documentary? Lions. Tigers. Bears. Oh my. But "Planet Earth," the Discovery Channel's breathtaking new wildlife series that globe-trots from caves to jungles to deserts...
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Hidden Enemies
As 2004 dawned, Saddam was in jail and his sons had been killed. But the initial, heady sense of victory continued to crumble. Iraq's civic and economic order had all but ceased to function--and many Iraqis blamed America. In Sunni-dominated cities...
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Our Soldiers' Stories; the War in the Words of the Dead
Byline: Jon Meacham He was exhausted, but he wanted to talk to his daughter, and the only way to do that in Fallujah was to write a letter. "This war is not like the big war--there are no big sweeping maneuvers with hundreds of tanks pouring over...
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Perspectives
"I will veto it if it comes to my desk." President George W. Bush,on a bill passed by the House to withdraw American troops from Iraq by September 2008 "Frankly, given what it looks like, we don't have the technical capacity to create something...
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The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham The handwriting on this week's cover belongs to Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Travis L. Youngblood, who was deployed to Iraq in March 2005. The full sentence, from a letter Youngblood wrote his wife, Laura, reads: "I have accepted...
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The List: Choosing the Chosen
Byline: Lisa Miller Michael Lynton was on a conference call recently when his assistant interrupted: Sen. Chuck Schumer was on the other line. Normally Lynton, who is chairman and CEO of Sony Pictures, would take a call from the senator. But not...
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The Weight of What-If
Byline: Anna Quindlen In the summer of 1971 I stood at the wire ticker and watched as my college boyfriend's lottery draft number came up 365. Only his cousin, born in a leap year, did better. It made it a certainty that neither would have to serve...
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Things Fall Apart
The air changed early on the morning of Feb. 22, 2006. That day a gang of saboteurs, presumably Sunni, destroyed one of the holiest shrines of Shiite Islam, the gold-domed Askariya Mosque in Samarra. The restraint that Shiites had demonstrated in the...
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To Topple a Tyrant
It's easy to forget how daunting and dangerous everything seemed on the eve of the Iraq War. U.S. forces were braced for the worst. Hardly anyone believed Iraq's claims that it no longer possessed any weapons of mass destruction--untold stockpiles...
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Was It Business or ... Personal?
Byline: Daniel McGinn Lawsuits are always written to make the target look guilty. But even by those standards, the countersuit filed last week by Wal-Mart against Julie Roehm is a devastating narrative. It alleges that before being fired in December,...
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We Protect Kids from Everything but Fear; with Hand Sanitizer and Long-Sleeved Swimsuits, We're Teaching Our Children a Dangerous Lesson
Byline: Paula Spencer (Spencer lives in Chapel Hill, N. C.) Four 11- and 12-year-old girls stood in front of my open pantry, mouths gaping wide. "Look! Fruit Roll-Ups!" "Oh, my God! Chocolate-chip cookies!" "You have regular potato chips? We only...
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What Breast-Cancer Survivors Can Expect
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz Last fall, Elizabeth Edwards was the guest speaker at a conference sponsored by NEWSWEEK and Harvard Medical School. Although she spoke about the sorrows in her life, she conveyed an inspiring optimism. Now she faces another...
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What the Warriors Cannot Do; It's Time to Call Iraq's Leaders to Account
Byline: Fareed Zakaria In the last weeks, the violence in Baghdad has moved from ghastly to merely grim, and we are told that the tide has turned. President Bush says the surge of U.S. troops is producing "encouraging signs." Many of his neoconservative...
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