Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 154, No. 11, September 14

Afghanistan's Hour upon the Stage
Byline: Jon Meacham The answer came quickly, and clearly. in may president Obama gave NEWSWEEK an interview on what he had learned in his first months in office. When asked what had been his most difficult decision, Obama answered without hesitation:...
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A Tale of Two Cities
Byline: Tony Payan; Payan has taught political science at UTEP since 2001. At least four times a week, i cross the border between Texas and Mexico. It's part of my job: I'm a professor at the University of Texas-El Paso, and I also teach and research...
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Cheney's Tortured Logic
Byline: Jonathan Alter; Alter is a national-affairs columnist. He wants to redefine the Constitution. Dick Cheney is in retirement, a cable nuisance but not a political threat to President Obama--unless there's another terrorist attack. In that...
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Eight Years On
A diplomat's perspective on the post-9/11 world. The 8 a.m. US Airways shuttle from Washington to New York City took off pretty much on time. The mid-September sky was clear, the air still, and most of the flight was perfectly uneventful. My State...
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Exterminate the Parasites
Byline: Daniel Lyons; Lyons Is Newsweek's Technology Editor. A radical plan to save old media. Since the dawn of the Internet, news organizations have accepted the notion that the only way to survive the onslaught of the Web is to publish everything...
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Haunted by History
Byline: Owen Matthews The ruins of the ancient Armenian capital of Ani are haunting, and haunted. On what is now a windblown patch of grassland enclosed in colossal walls and dotted with ancient cathedrals, there was once a great city. You can still...
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Innocent until Executed
Byline: Dahlia Lithwick; Lithwick also writes for slate.com. We have no right to exoneration. For years, death-penalty opponents and supporters have been working their way toward a mo-ment in which each side would rethink things. They were seeking...
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Life's a Bitch
Byline: David Ansen It's Friday night, and you feel like avoiding the usual Hollywood fare and taking in a documentary. Which would you rather see: a film about the disastrous consequences of climate change, which foresees humanity's extinction...
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Palestine's New Perspective
Byline: Kevin Peraino Prime Minister Salam Fayyad's unorthodox approach is winning plaudits from the West. That could be his undoing. The Middle East is full of men who aim to impose order--it's been that way since at least the time of the pharaohs....
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Pink Brain, Blue Brain
Byline: Sharon Begley; Begley is NEWSWEEK's science editor. Claims of sex differences fall apart. Among certain parents, it is an article of faith not only that they should treat their sons and daughters alike, but also that they do. If Jack...
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Schoolhouses Rock in Iran
Byline: Babak Dehghanpisheh For almost the first time since June's contested election, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad seemed confidently at the helm last week when nearly all his cabinet picks were approved by Parliament. He even signaled a willingness...
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See Baby Discriminate
Byline: Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman Kids as young as 6 months judge others based on skin color. What's a parent to do? At the Children's Research Lab at the University of Texas, a database is kept on thousands of families in the Austin area...
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The Geopolitics of Golf
You can judge a country by its greens. The final and decisive round of the PGA Championship in mid-August unfolded in a manner few had predicted. Tiger Woods, the American who firmly occupies the top spot in world rankings, lost his lead and came...
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The Great Jobs Question
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson; Samuelson is the author of The Great Inflation and its Aftermath. What if they don't come back? The first Labor Day, held in New York City in 1882, was less a celebration of the dignity of work than a demonstration...
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Their Love Is Alive
Byline: Louisa Thomas It began as a game to pass the time while the rain fell and lightning struck. Visiting Switzerland in June 1816, a small group--young and rivalrous, amorous and ever so literary--agreed to a ghost story writing contest. Mary...
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The Rise and Fall of Hancock Tower
Byline: Daniel Gross; With Stuart Johnson in New York For most of its 34-year life, the Hancock Tower, which looms above its brick neighbors in Boston's Back Bay, has been the sort of place where money comes to be managed and protected. Its tenants...
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