Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 151, No. 16, April 21

A Gun in One Hand, A Pen in the Other
Byline: Dan Ephron And Silvia Spring ***** In "A Gun in One Hand, A Pen in the Other," we incorrectly identified retired Col. Steve Fondacaro as a veteran of Special Forces. He was a Special Operations Force officer with the 75th Ranger Regiment....
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A Libertarian Surge?
Byline: George F. Will Bob Barr will be dry-eyed if his candidacy is to John McCain what Ralph Nader's was to Al Gore in 2000. Compact and Feisty Bob Barr, 59, probably will seek and get the presidential nomination of the Libertarian Party, which...
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A Man at Home in the World
Byline: Richard Wolffe And Michael Hirsh; With Erika Kinetz In Jakarta And Sarah Kliff In New York Obama says he knows the globe better than his rivals. Does he know it too well? He was just a college kid, vagabonding around the world. But Barack...
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'America Can Be A Force [for] Good in the World'
Byline: Richard Wolffe An 'anti-doctrinaire candidate' maps out his foreign-policy priorities and the personal experiences that shaped them. His travel dossier was unusual already, with his school years in Indonesia and family ties in Kenya,...
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Anchored to the Ground
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts CBS news had a problem. It was 1952, and the network had dispatched its stars to the first nationally televised Republican National Convention. But CBS wanted to showcase an impressive rookie, Walter Cronkite. A young...
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A New Reason to Frown
Byline: Sharon Begley; With Matthew Philips ***** CORRECTION: In the April 21 "Popular Shots" graphic accompanying "A New Reason to Frown," we reversed meanings and should have said that an eyelid spasm is called blepharospasm, and lazy eye,...
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A Papal Pilgrimage
Byline: Raymond Arroyo Judging from the early coverage of the pope's upcoming U.S. visit, you'd think that Attila the Hun in red Prada shoes was about to stride onto American soil. "He's coming to deliver a stern message," the scribblers warn. "He's...
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A Renegade against Greenpeace
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Why he says they're wrong to view nuclear energy as 'evil' Patrick Moore is a critic of the environmental movement--an unlikely one at that. He was one of the cofounders of Greenpeace, and sailed into the Aleutian Islands...
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A Very Busy Mama
Does Amy Poehler sleep? She costars in the movie "Baby Mama," is the co creator of the new animated Nickelodeon show "The Mighty B!" and of course spends her weekends at "Saturday Night Live." She spoke to Nicki Gostin: What's your cartoon about?...
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Boycott Opening Ceremonies
Byline: Jonathan Alter Set aside Tibet and other legit grievances. Make Chinese action on Darfur a condition of attending. It's a 100-day dash, and the world had better get at least a silver. In the time before the Beijing Olympics opens in August,...
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Color Blind at Schools That Aren't
Byline: Catharine Skipp And Arian Campo-Flores Like most university recruiters who target Hispanic students, Christina Diaz crisscrosses the country, attending college fairs and chatting up potential applicants. Except in her case, there's a twist:...
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Condolences-10 Years Later
Byline: Katie Couric I've finally shared with my girls the letters I received after Jay's death. Even the word feels clunky and uncomfortable. "Condolences." No wonder so many of us are at a loss when dealing with loss. The right words can be...
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Dilemmas of the Horn
Byline: Scott Johnson; With Jason Mclure In Addis Ababa Washington wanted to keep Somalia from turning into another Afghanistan. Now it's an African Iraq. The jihadist leads a double life. By day he's a government functionary in the Somali capital...
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Don't Feed China's Nationalism
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Public humiliation does not work nearly as well on the regime in Beijing as private pressure. At first glance, China's recent crackdown in Tibet looks like a familiar storyline: a dictatorship represses its people. And...
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Geek Love, Full Frontal
Byline: David Ansen Another comedy from the Judd Apatow school From its raunchy, genitally obsessed dialogue to its tender heart, "Forgetting Sarah Marshall" is instantly recognizable as a product of Clubhouse Apatow. Its director, first-timer...
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How Benedict XVI Will Make History
Byline: George Weigel; Weigel, a NEWSWEEK contributor, is Distinguished Senior Fellow of the Ethics and Public Policy Center. The master teacher who follows John Paul is a moral leader who's begun an unprecedented conversation with Islam. According...
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Is Your Rabbi Hot or Not?
Byline: Lisa Miller; With Dan Brillman Last spring, NEWSWEEK published a list of the 50 most influential rabbis in America, created and compiled by three nice (and rich and powerful) Jewish media big shots who, it seemed, didn't have quite enough...
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It's So Nice to Be Here
Byline: Michael Isikoff And Mark Hosenball; With Steve Ambrus In Bogota And Kendall Hill In Sydney How Bill's big-dollar foreign buckraking is causing headaches for Hillary's campaign. The event at a New York Hotel last June was called "Colombia...
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Late Bloomer
Byline: Joshua Alston Craig Ferguson can't beat Dave's or Jay's ratings, but he's got something bigger: a date with the president. Craig Ferguson always hated to fly. Hated it. In fact, he hated it from the age of 13, when he flew from his native...
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Making My MacMark
Byline: Curt MacDougall; MacDougall Lives In Lowell, Mich. I never felt a strong connection to my Scottish heritage, yet it's now an indelible part of me. There is an arm, sheathed in medieval battle gear and resting on what looks like a crown,...
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May We Scan Your Genome?
Byline: Claudia Kalb; With Tina Peng As personal genetic testing takes off, some worry that marketing is getting ahead of science. DNA is hip. At least that's what the new breed of genetic marketers would like you to believe. Last week, Navigenics,...
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New Homes in A New World
Byline: Gretel C. Kovach And Arian Campo-Flores In the largest child-welfare intervention in Texas history, authorities last week raided the Eldorado ranch of the Fundamentalist Church of Latter-day Saints (FLDS), a breakaway polygamous sect not...
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Perspectives
"That's my phone buzzing there. I don't want you to think I'm getting fresh or anything." Presidential hopeful Barack Obama, explaining the strange vibration coming from his hip pocket during a close photo op with two female cafe workers in Indiana...
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Silver Linings in the Sky?
Byline: Daniel Gross A recession may actually be good news for fliers stressed out over delays. Already the number of flights is decreasing. As I sat on a plane last year, covering my ears to block out the cacophony of a half-dozen deal jockeys...
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Spring Clean Your Air
Byline: Joan Raymond Joe Minott says he sometimes feels like a bit player in a remake of the B-movie classic "Godzilla vs. the Smog Monster." On hot, sunny days, when a blanket of smog--a noxious mix of ground-level ozone and other pollutants--darkens...
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State and Defense: For Once, Opposites Attract
Byline: Mark Hosenball And Evan Thomas The comity between the two is a '180- degree turn' from Rumsfeld and Powell. Some of the most bitter battles in Washington have been fought between the secretaries of State and Defense. They are often competitors...
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The Divorce Generation Grows Up
Byline: David J. Jefferson; With Temma Ehrenfeld The kids of Grant High's class of '82 were raised on 'The Brady Bunch'--while their own families were falling apart. These are their stories--in their words. I grew up in Los Angeles's San Fernando...
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The Editor's Desk
Byline: Daniel Klaidman Many months ago, my boss, Jon Meacham, came into the morning meeting with a project in mind. He asked us to launch a cover story on the legacy of divorce in America. Divorce has been one of the more potent social forces in...
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The Game-Ratings Game
Byline: N'Gai Croal Since launching What They Play four months ago, Davison has been surprised by just how concerned parents are about profanity. One of the best perks of being a journalist is that your colleagues are all experts in various fields,...
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The Lessons of Rwanda
Byline: Ellis Cose The important thing is not how quickly the country is healing but how easily it descended into madness. For a hundred days, beginning in April 1994, a tiny African nation seized the world's attention by spewing forth unspeakably...
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The States of Play
Byline: Howard Fineman Barack Obama has never gone hunting and isn't planning to. But his campaign last week reached out to the hunters and anglers of Appalachia, touting his professorial faith in the Constitution--and, by extension, the Second...
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The Supreme Penalty for Rape
We are witnessing either a burgeoning new trend for executing rapists--or the last gasps of capital punishment. This week, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear a case about whether--for the first time in decades--a criminal can be executed for a crime...
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Where Have You Been?
Byline: Joshua Alston The British band Portishead hasn't released an album in 11 years--until now. It was worth the wait. The title of the third album from the British electronic-pop group Portishead is--wait for it--"Third." Disappointing, isn't...
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Why This Pope Doesn't Connect
Byline: Lisa Miller; With Matthew Philips, Daniel Stone and Eve Conant Benedict has done little to appeal to an American flock that is in need of a serious spiritual catharsis. The Rev. Gerald Fogarty decided not to go to the pope's mass in Washington...
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