Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 16

12 Ideas for the Planet
JOHN R. MCNEILL Former Cinco Hermanos Chair Of Environmental and International Affairs, Georgetown University The next 50 years are make-or-break The way I look at it, global climate change and the environment have been important for quite some...
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A Flash of Concern
Byline: Pat Wingert Hot flashes, those intense waves of heat that leave many menopausal women in a sweat, have long been called annoying. But dangerous? Not really--until, possibly, now. A new, large-scale study by the National Institutes of Health...
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A Parallel Peacemaker; No, Not Pelosi. Meet Ibrahim Soliman, a Syrian National, Who's Been in Quiet Talks with Israel
Byline: Dan Ephron In the living room of his home in suburban Maryland, Ibrahim Soliman unfolds a topographical map of the Golan Heights, the territory Israel captured from Syria in 1967 that remains at the heart of their dispute. Covered on both...
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Belief Watch: Sweet Jesus
Byline: Lisa Miller Last Monday, as Christians around the globe prepared for Holy Week and Easter, the Italian-American artist Cosimo Cavallaro was leading a car chase through the streets of New York City. With reporters trailing close behind, Cavallaro...
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'Boomsday' Is Approaching; We Self-Indulgent Baby Boomers Have Planned Big Tax Increases for Our Children to Cover Our Retirement. Guess What? They May Not Go Along
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson Cassandra Devine knows how to solve the coming "entitlements" crisis, preordained when the 77 million baby boomers begin hitting 65 in 2011: pay retirees to commit suicide, a program she calls "transitioning." Volunteers...
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Building an Empire One Block at a Time; in an Age of High-Tech Toys, Lego Is Reinventing Itself. the Old-Fashioned Bricks Have Never Been More Popular. Here's How the Company Does It
Byline: Daniel Mcginn (With Samantha Henig) Like most parents, Phil and Karyn Corless face a constant struggle to keep their home from becoming overrun with toys. They have a specially designated toy closet in their Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, home, and...
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Capital Ideas
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn (Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld) Do you carry a life-insurance policy that protects your young children if you die? Most parents do--but there's a legal angle you need to think about. Minor children can't receive money...
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Curbing Emissions Won't Be Enough; SCIENCE: We're Great at Spewing CO2 into the Air. Visionaries Are Now Devising Ways to Suck It Out
Byline: Sharon Begley Like many people who are scrambling for ways to stave off climate disaster, Klaus Lackner is thinking trees. But not the kind with green leaves and roots, and certainly not the sweet little specimens that "carbon offset" purveyors...
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EarthTerm
Carbon Footprint A way of representing the effect human activities have on the climate in terms of the total amount of greenhouse gases produced. This quantity is usually measured in units of carbon dioxide emitted per year. Net Metering A method...
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Gonzales Crams for a Senate Grilling
Byline: Michael Isikoff Attorney General Alberto Gonzales has virtually wiped his public schedule clean to bone up for his long-awaited April 17 testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee--a session widely seen as a crucial test as to whether...
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Good Boy, Beau. Stay. Put a Pork Roast in the Oven, and the Guy Still Breathes as Audibly as an Obscene Caller. the Eyes and Ears Are Gone, but the Nose Is Eternal
Byline: Anna Quindlen I am that most pathetic of human creatures, a human who walks into a veterinarian's office without an animal. "Beau?" the woman behind the desk calls, and I rise. Dr. Brown ushers me back into an examining room kitted out with...
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Greetings from Horrorwood; after the A List Saw 'Saw'-And Its Bloody Big Profits-Horror Suddenly Isn't So Scary Anymore
Byline: Devin Gordon The medical photographs on Robert Rodriguez's laptop are, in a word, disgusting. They show real, live human beings afflicted with ... actually, Robert, why don't you explain? "It's this thing called 'necrotizing fasciitis.'...
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'Harry Potter:' She's Unpretty in Pink
Byline: Sean Smith The first female villain hits Hogwarts in "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix." Imelda Staunton, Oscar-nominated for "Vera Drake," plays Dolores Umbridge, the new Defence Against the Dark Arts teacher. A year before Staunton...
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How Green Is Your Candidate?
Byline: HOLLY BAILEY, ARIAN CAMPO-FLORES and JONATHAN DARMAN 2008: Global warming, hybrid cars and renewable energy have been hot topics on the campaign trail this year. But what exactly are the top White House hopefuls proposing--and do they practice...
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How to Live a Greener Life; Resources: A Few Ways to Help Reduce the Billions of Metric Tons of Greenhouse-Gas Emissions Created Yearly by the U.S
Byline: Jessica Ramirez At Home Calculate your impact: If knowledge is power, then take a minute to assess the damage. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's online calculator estimates greenhouse-gas emissions that result from your household...
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Is Fiber the New Protein?
Byline: Joan Raymond Debbie Fireman is a self-proclaimed fiber junkie. The 41-year-old marketing exec from Penn Valley, Pa., eats fiber-rich foods "all day long," including whole foods like fruits, veggies, grains and beans. But that's not all....
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It's Hip to Be Green; Activism: For Today's Young People, Fixing the Environment Is Job One. and They Have Their Own Ideas about How to Do It
Byline: Anna Kuchment (With Catharine Skipp in Winston-Salem, N.C., and Heidi Richter) Just before the first amplified chords of Guster's hit single "Satellite" filled the hall, lead singer Ryan Miller stepped up to the mike. Instead of belting...
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It's Never That Simple; Some on Wall Street Want Us to Believe They've Figured out How to Eliminate Risk. They Haven't. but by Claiming Otherwise, They've Made Investing Scarier
Byline: Allan Sloan (Sloan is NEWSWEEK's Wall Street editor. His e-mail is sloan@panix.com.) The world of high finance can be a perverse place. Consider the possibility that by playing financial games to make it look like they have less risk than...
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Mail Call: Their Last, Precious Words; Readers Are Moved by the Voices of Our Fallen Warriors
Our April 2 Special Issue drew hundreds of letters from Americans overcome with emotion while reading the words of fallen service members in Iraq. One called it a "somber and poignant compendium of the words of brave men and women who gave their lives...
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Many Easy Pieces; His May Be the Ultimate Career Change. He Gave Up a Big-City Job in Corporate Law for Kids' Play: Building Legos for a Living
Byline: Andrew Romano Following your dream isn't always child's play. Just ask Nathan Sawaya. Two years ago, Sawaya, then 31, found himself at the Seattle Boat Show. Having recently quit his $150,000 job as a Wall Street lawyer, he was now scrambling...
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Mayors Take the Lead; Cities: The Federal Government Has Been Dithering on Climate Change and Energy Conservation for Years. Lucky for Us, America's Local Leaders Are Filling the Vacuum
Byline: Anne Underwood (With Matthew Philips) Sometimes great ideas are born of desperation. For Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels, that sense of urgency developed in the winter of 2004-05, when the annual snowfall failed to materialize in the neighboring...
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McCain's Meltdown
Byline: Jonathan Alter By his own admission, John McCain knew a little something about crashing aircraft when he was in the Navy. Three times, he ended up losing control in the cockpit, and that doesn't even include when he was shot down over Hanoi...
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Medicine Man; Pfizer's CEO Talks about Layoffs, Regulatory Issues and the Public's Unhappiness about Drug Prices
Byline: Richard M. Smith When Pfizer's board chose a new CEO last summer, it passed over two 30-year Pfizer veterans to pick vice chairman and general counsel Jeff Kindler, who joined the company in 2002 after stints at General Electric and McDonald's....
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Mint Julep, Anyone?
Byline: Karen Springen To watch the "greatest two minutes in sports"--the Kentucky Derby--you can mix yourself a mint julep and turn on the tube. Or you could head to Churchill Downs for the 133rd Run for the Roses, which is held on the first Saturday...
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Mitt's Initial Public Offering; Can Romney, a Big Shot from the Private Sector Who Is Accustomed to Control, Handle the Chaos of a Political Campaign?
Byline: Evan Thomas, Samantha Henig and Jonathan Darman (With Daniel McGinn) Mitt Romney seemed to be on a roll. His campaign had just reported that it had raised over $20 million, more than either Rudy Giuliani ($15 million) or John McCain ($12.5...
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Moment of Truth; Is the Push to Save the Planet a Fad, or a Turning Point? Here's Hoping It's the Real Deal
Byline: Jerry Adler No sooner did James McCarthy's name turn up in an associated Press story on the outlook for global warming than he started getting outraged e-mails from colleagues. All that McCarthy, a Harvard oceanographer who studies how climate...
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More Trouble for Kerik
Byline: Mark Hosenball Presidential hopeful Rudy Giuliani has issued apologies for recommending that the White House nominate Bernard Kerik as Homeland Security secretary. But the apologies have not staunched the flow of embarrassing revelations....
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Newsmakers
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh Q&A: Kevin Spacey Spacey opens on Broadway this week in "A Moon for the Misbegotten." He spoke to Ramin Setoodeh. Hello. This is Ramin Setoodeh from NEWSWEEK. Hey. It's Kevin Spacey from "A Moon for the Misbegotten."...
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One of America's 'Baddest'; for One Day, She Was on the Ten Most Wanted List
Byline: Catharine Skipp and Arian Campo-Flores Shauntay Henderson evidently loved her notoriety. A suspected murderer and member of Kansas City, Mo.'s violent 12th Street gang, she touted her gangsta cred with gusto on her MySpace page. When police...
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Pandora's Music Box; Labels May Not like It, but Radio on the Net Is Catching On
Byline: Steven Levy Tim Westergren's brain-child, "The Music Genome Project," sounds vaguely "Monty Python"-ish--a system by which trained musician-analysts break down songs into hundreds of categories to find which tunes work well together in playlists....
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Perspectives
Byline: QUOTATION SOURCES FROM TOP TO BOTTOM, LEFT TO RIGHT: New York Times, Reuters, Los Angeles Times (2), AP, New York Times, Newsday, Reuters, New York Times, New York Daily News "Some of us feared the worst." Capt. Chris Air of the Royal...
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Pumping Hormones into GM's Nest Egg
Byline: Allan Sloan There hasn't been much good news out of General Motors in recent years, but you'll be glad to know that at least one part of GM's United States operations is finally fixed: its pension funds. GM may be having a hard time turning...
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Rooting for the Home Team Is Not So Easy; Watching My Country, Cuba, Compete at a Baseball Tournament Triggered Conflicted Memories
Byline: Magaly Olivero (Olivero lives in White Plains, N.Y.) Walking into San Diego's Petco Park just over a year ago, I heard the voice of Cuban icon Celia Cruz singing her classic song, "Cuba que lindos son tus paisajes." I couldn't help but sway...
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Student-Loan Secrets; A National Scandal over For-Profit College Lending Deepens
Byline: Pat Wingert As millions of high-school seniors ripped open college-acceptance letters last week, a brewing student-loan scandal was dragging in a growing number of schools, for-profit loan companies and government officials. In recent...
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Suicide Offensive; Face to Face with the Taliban's New Favorite Weapon in the Afghan War: Human Bombs
Byline: Sami Yousafzai and Ron Moreau The village was in Taliban country, roughly 170 miles southwest of Kabul and more than an hour by foot from the main road. When a NEWSWEEK reporter walked in alone through the snow one cold February day, a guerrilla...
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The Case for a Global Carbon Tax; Options: The Only Way to Slow Climate Change Is to Make Coal More Expensive and Alternatives Cheaper
***** CORRECTION: Correction: Fareed Zakaria's April 16 column ("The Case for a Global Carbon Tax") contained an error. U.S. energy consumption is 1.3 times greater than it was 30 years ago, not three times greater. NEWSWEEK regrets the error. ...
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The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham Thirty-seven years ago, in the Jan. 26, 1970, issue of NEWSWEEK, our friend and colleague Kenneth Auchincloss, whom we lost to cancer in 2003, wrote a cover essay titled "The Ravaged Environment." Ken began: "It seems the curse...
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The End of Inevitability; the Clinton Camp Pressed Donors to Give Only to Hillary. Then the Strategy Backfired
Byline: Richard Wolffe (With Holly Bailey, Jonathan Darman and Eleanor Clift) There's a turncoat inside Hillary Clinton's money machine. Over the past several years, Leonore Blitz has helped raise about $250,000 for Clinton's Senate races, and she...
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The Green Giant; Carbon Czar: California's Hummer-Loving Governor Is Turning the Golden State into the Greenest in the Land, a Place Where Environmentalism and Hedonism Can Coexist. How a Star Turned Pol's Become the Muscle Behind Saving the Planet
Byline: Karen Breslau "Pimp My Ride" isn't the sort of television program one watches for a lesson in eco-consciousness. Each week on the MTV reality show, one lucky teenager's old clunker is transformed into an outrageously appointed dream car...
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The 'Iron Man' of Business; Baseball's Legendary Shortstop-The Man Who Played in 2,632 Consecutive Games-Now Runs a $25 Million Company. Here's How He Made the Transition
Byline: Cal Ripken Jr. (Ripken played for the Baltimore Orioles from 1981 to 2001. He holds the record for most consecutive games played (2,632).) Even as a young player, I began thinking about life after baseball. I knew that if I was lucky I might...
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The Pets We Love- and Drug; Meds for Animals Are Booming. Really
Byline: Matthew Philips Fluffy is getting old. Going on 13, she's geriatric for a Rottweiler. And like many people past retirement age, she takes a lot of pills--steroids for her bad hips and pinched nerve, a chewable tablet for her underactive...
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The War of the Words; Debate: Whether It's Climate 'Chaos', 'Change' or 'Crisis', Language Comes First in the Environment Fight
Byline: Jerry Adler What is the most pressing environmental issue we face today? "Global warming"? The "greenhouse effect"? At the Oscar ceremonies, Al Gore referred to a "climate crisis," but in his State of the Union address President Bush chose...
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'We Are a Nation-State'; Interview: 'The Governator' Walks Where Washington Fears to Tread When It Comes to Global Warming
Byline: Karen Breslau That he's a cigar-smoking environmentalist, says Arnold Schwarzenegger, allows him to do one of the things he loves most: defy stereotypes. After taping a cameo on MTV's "Pimp My Ride," Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger was whisked...
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What's Iran Thinking? A New Hostage Crisis Ends Well-But Mysteriously
Byline: Michael Hirsh and Mark Hosenball (With Babak Dehghanpisheh in Baghdad and William Underhill in London) They were two very different crises. One lasted 444 days, humiliated an American president, and became a national obsession as 52 hostages...
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Where China's Rivers Run Dry; Asia: The Most Dramatic National Transformation in Human History Is Being Threatened by a Lack of Water
Byline: Orville Schell (Schell is the Arthur Ross director at the Asia Society's Center for U.S.-China Relations.) The view from the top of the luxurious Morgan Centre (which will soon host a seven-star hotel) down onto Beijing's Olympic Green,...
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Will Polar Bears Be OK? Anxiety: How to Talk to Kids Worried about Global Warming
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz and Karen Springen Sean Hussey and his twin sister, Erin, are only 9 years old, but they already know all about global warming. And they're worried, very worried. Teachers at their Hillsborough, Calif., school have shown...
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