Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 150, No. 26, December 24

A Ghost, A Wizard and the Rest Are Joys
All years have beginnings and ends, firsts and bests. But in the world of books, 2007 felt like a year of final chapters. After nine novels, Philip Roth laid to rest his alter ego, Nathan Zuckerman. J. K. Rowling gave Harry Potter a magical send-off....
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A Life Full of Riches
Byline: Karl R. Green; Green Lives In Cedar Rapids, Iowa. This material world constantly reminds me of what I don't have. But somehow I still feel wealthy. It was early December 2003, my first season as a salvation Army bell ringer, when I was...
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A Rock Star's Rebirth
Byline: Keith Naughton Carlos Ghosn made history saving Nissan. Then the company stumbled. Now he's trying for a comeback. It's seven minutes to Showtime, and Carlos Ghosn is backstage and ready to roll. A translucent angel-hair microphone descends...
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A Safe Harbor in the Storm
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn; Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld Ignore the stories about the risks in money-market funds. They're safe because their sponsors will back them up. On Wall Street, securities once thought to be safe are falling apart....
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A Sequel to the Subprime Mess?
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson The danger is another wave of large financial losses and a chain reaction of fear that paralyzes investors and banks. There is a vast gap of perception and language between the real economy of production and jobs and...
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A Son's Past Deeds Come Back to Bite Huckabee
Byline: MICHAEL ISIKOFF AND HOLLY BAILEY As Mike Huckabee gains in the polls, the former Arkansas governor is finding that his record in office is getting more scrutiny. One issue likely to get attention is his handling of a sensitive family matter:...
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A Visit to 'The Orphanage'
Byline: David Ansen I used to love horror movies, but now I tend to dread screen dread. It's not that I've grown too old and jaded to be scared -- nobody outgrows fear -- but the new breed of horror movies, pitched almost exclusively at young male...
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Big Fun in Purgatory
Byline: David Gates; With Jac Chebatoris These short Samuel Beckett plays go from hopeless to more so. No reason you can't have a good time. "Beckett Shorts" is my kind of Super Bowl: four short works by the most intense and radical playwright...
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Calling in A Late Family Intervention
Byline: Richard Wolffe Hillary Clinton's ritual end-of-day conference call with senior advisers on Dec. 11 was anything but a normal strategy session. Clinton's aides had just learned of the next day's New York Daily News story (headline: HONEY,...
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Electroshock Therapy
Byline: Ashley R. Harris Taser International tries to soften its weapon's harsh image, with a civilian model designed just for her. Every Saturday afternoon in Scottsdale, Ariz., women gather at Dana Shafman's house to watch demonstrations of...
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Fake It till You Make It
Byline: Sophie Grove The Greenhalghs looked like such a nice family. But you should see what they cooked up in their kitchen. The Greenhalgh family -- 47- year-old Shaun and his octogenarian parents, Olive and George -- lived quietly together...
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First Tuesday of Huh?
Byline: Anna Quindlen Every four years Americans select a president. Given our crazy system, it's a miracle that we manage to seal the deal. Every once in a while you see a Frankenstein monster of a house on a suburban street. The original structure...
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For the Love of Christ
Byline: Lorraine Ali Justin Fatica yells, threatens and humiliates teens into finding Jesus. You got a problem with that? Justin Fatica has a cross to bear, and last year he did it in front of more than 60,000 American teens. The 27-year-old...
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Grounding the Rocket
Byline: Mark Starr When Roger Clemens reported to Red Sox spring-training camp in Ft. Myers, Fla., in February 1996, he appeared headed for the swan-song stage of his career. "Rocket" Roger had slumped his last few seasons in Boston and now, at...
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Hold the Salt, Please
Byline: Jennifer Barrett Ed Goldston used to sprinkle salt on almost everything he ate -- from soups and salads to steak. That changed about 15 years ago when his doctor diagnosed him with hypertension and told him to go on a low-sodium diet. The...
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'I'm Going to Speak the Truth'
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores John Edwards has 'bold ideas,' but not much time to get them across. This is it. John Edwards, who has all but lived in Iowa since 2004, is now in his final push in the Hawkeye State. Last week, aboard his campaign...
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I'm More Anti-Illegals!
Byline: Howard Fineman In normal times, Steve King is an obscure figure -- A low-ranking Republican congressman from rural western Iowa. But these aren't normal times: Iowa's caucuses are almost here. So King suddenly is a kingmaker and symbol...
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It's Gut-Check Time
Byline: Jonathan Alter Candidates who connect to their real selves and deepest motivations win. Phonies fade fast. With restoring prisoners' rights of habeas corpus now a surefire applause line at Democratic events, maybe it's time for more Latin:...
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Perspectives
"My own country, the United States, is principally responsible for obstructing progress here in Bali." Former vice president Al Gore, at the United Nations' Climate Conference, after the United States refused to accept specific targets for cutting...
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Questionable Conduct
Byline: Dan Ephron Chaplains, sexual abuse and what the military knows Ensign P. recalls struggling during his third year at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md. His mother was dying of an illness back home, and his grades dropped so low...
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Sanity and Sentencing
Byline: Ellis Cose The 'get tough' policies of the 1980s don't work; they undermine faith in the fairness of the justice system. For two decades, the federal government has pursued, prosecuted and sentenced cocaine offenders in a way that borders...
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Swinging A Hammer with Brad
Byline: Nicki Gostin Brad Pitt -- You've heard of him, haven't you? -- is launching a program to build homes in New Orleans. He spoke to Nicki Gostin. What is your project called? Makeitrightnola.org. It's a rebuilding effort that's beginning...
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The 'Body Contractors'
Byline: Babak Dehghanpisheh; With Salih Mahdi And Hussam Ali In Baghdad Death squads are killing fewer people, but they're also taking more care to hide their grisly handiwork. Jabber Sowadi's job says something about the depths to which Iraq...
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The Edtior's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham John Edwards had just changed his shirt -- blue for blue -- and opened a Diet Sunkist orange soda. It was a hot New Hampshire day late in the summer, and Jonathan Darman and I had gone up to check in on Edwards's retail political...
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The Games of Their Lives
Byline: Jerry Adler From getting high to getting rich to getting serious, boomers kept changing the meaning of success. Whoever dies with the most toys, wins. It might not have been the most profound statement of the meaning of existence,...
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The Peachfuzz Billionaires
Byline: Steven Levy Not just the business plans, but the fashion preferences and dating habits of this young tech cohort are followed voraciously. Early in the year I found myself in a room full of entrepreneurs, part of a "boot camp" run by...
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The Power of Personality
Byline: Fareed Zakaria When I talk to people in a foreign country, no matter how strange, they are always familiar to me. I never thought I'd be in this position. There's a debate taking place about what matters most when making judgments about...
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The Real McCoy
Byline: Joshua Alston This season on 'Law & Order,' Sam Waterston gets a big promotion. We don't think it's big enough. Sam Waterston is sitting inside downtown Manhattan's City Hall restaurant, shooting a scene for what will become his 317th...
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The Road Warrior
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores and Suzanne Smalley; With Holly Bailey, Jonathan Alter, Eleanor Clift And Jessica Ramirez ***** Correction: In "The Road Warrior" (Dec. 24), we stated that "under Iowa's arcane caucus rules, a precinct where 25 people...
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The Roots of Fear
Byline: Sharon Begley; With Anne Underwood, Richard Wolffe And Suzanne Smalley On The Campaign Trail, And Jeneen Interlandi THE evolutionary primacy of the brain's fear circuitry makes it more powerful than reasoning circuits. For the candidate...
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The Savvy, Salty Political Saint
Byline: Julia Baird; With Jennie Yabroff Eleanor Roosevelt was not just an idealistic First Lady. As a new collection of papers reveals, she was also a smart, disciplined and unabashed strategist. Eleanor Roosevelt, a woman known for her upright...
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Tracking A Paper Trail
Byline: Mark Hosenball And Michael Isikoff In the summer of 2005, the then CIA Director Porter Goss met with the then National Intelligence Director John Negroponte to discuss a highly sensitive matter: what to do about the existence of videotapes...
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Two Leaders, on A Collision Course
Byline: Lally Weymouth With a controversial election only weeks away, Pakistan's president and its leading opposition politician square off. THE PRESIDENT PERVEZ MUSHARRAF Two days before he planned to lift the state of emergency he had...
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When Docs Are in Doubt
Byline: Mary Carmichael There's a reason doctors started acting godlike: some patients wanted to believe it wasn't just an act. Few people know better than I do that doctors are imperfect beings: I married one, and for all his brilliance, he...
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