Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 158, No. 15, October 10

A Medical Gamble
Byline: Sharon Begley; Sharon Begley writes about science and health for Newsweek. Cancer in the pancreas doesn't have to be a death sentence. How Steve Jobs tried--but failed--to beat the odds. Steve Jobs was right to be optimistic when, in...
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Death Is 'Life's Change Agent'
Live every day as if it's your last. An excerpt from Steve Jobs's memorable address to Stanford's class of 2005. When I was 17, I read a quote that went something like: "If you live each day as if it was your last, someday you'll most certainly...
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Design Different
Byline: Steven Heller; Steven Heller is the co-chair of the SVA MFA design program. Steve Jobs's true genius was in design--from phones to retail, he reshaped our world with a look that was cool, clean, and friendly. When it came to design, Steve...
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Garage Band
Byline: Dan Lyons; Dan Lyons writes about technology for Newsweek. Steve Wozniak built a motherboard. Steve Jobs built a business. The seeds of Apple's triumph. They began as outlaws. In 1971, 16-year-old Steve Jobs and his 20-year-old pal Steve...
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He Made Geek Chic
Byline: Robin Givhan; Robin Givhan writes about fashion for Newsweek. Suits are for suckers. With his turtleneck-and-jeans uniform, Jobs was the real nerdy deal, the corporate dork his customers didn't have to be. Women have long struggled with...
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"Hi. It's Steve."
Byline: Aaron Sorkin; Aaron Sorkin is a screenwriter and producer. Aaron Sorkin on an unforgettable phone call. "Why don't you come on up here and let me give you a tour of the place." I'd never met Steve Jobs but we'd begun a phone friendship....
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Hollywood's 'Devilish Angel'
Byline: Nick Summers; Nick Summers is a senior writer for Newsweek covering media. Ousted from Apple, Jobs looked to moviemaking for salvation--and nearly bankrupted himself in the process. Computers didn't make Steve Jobs a billionaire--toys...
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How 'Bout Them Apples?
For four decades, Steve Jobs created the gadgets and toys we use for work and play. 1976 Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak cofound Apple on April Fools' Day and begin building the first Apple computer in Jobs's garage. 1977 The Apple II launches,...
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Remembering Jobs
Within minutes of his death, tributes flooded in, including millions on Facebook and Twitter. Blake Seely, Apple employee "His legacy wasn't any specific product. It's Apple. That's a lot of pressure. We have to rise to it and make all his work...
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Thanks for the Future
How a college dropout trusted his gut, defied corporate America, and carried us into tomorrow. New York City, March 20, 1983: Steve Jobs is gazing at ancient Greek sculptures in the Metropolitan Museum of Art as he spends the day with John Sculley,...
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The Best of Frenemies
Byline: Leander Kahney The relationship between Gates and Jobs was always complicated, sometimes nasty, and, in the end, surprisingly tender. In 1997, Steve Jobs took the stage at Macworld in Boston. It was one of his first public appearances...
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The First Love of Jobs's Life
Laurene Powell Jobs is warm, funny, socially engaged, and intensely private. Meet the apple of the great genius's eye. You've fallen in love with the genius future billionaire and married him. How do you then live? You can devote yourself, like...
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The Geniuses We'll Never Know
Byline: Niall Ferguson This essay is not about Steve Jobs. It is about the countless individuals with roughly the same combination of talents of whom we've never heard and never will. Most of the 106 billion people who've ever lived are dead--around...
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The Godfathers of His Genius
The inspired innovators before him who made Steve Jobs's triumphs possible. In the pantheon of American innovators, nobody comes close to the defining legacy of Steve Jobs. It is commonly misrepresented. He was not an Edison. He was not equipped...
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The Jobs Number
Byline: Josh Dzieza He changed more than the computer business. Jobs transformed every industry he touched. MOVIES Jobs bought the computer division of George Lucas's company, initially for its software. After a rough beginning, which included...
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The Next Tech Guru?
Byline: Nick Summers They say he was one of a kind. But someone has to fill Jobs's sneakers. LARRY PAGE Google A computational genius--Google's crucial "PageRank" technology is named after his graduate work at Stanford--Page and partner Sergey...
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The Pixar Touch
Other studios caught up to the 3-D tech--but never the storytelling. Toy Story 1995 The world's first computer-generated feature film became the highest-grossing movie of the year. Digital animation was here to stay. A Bug's Life 1998 ...
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The Tech Seer
Steve Jobs wasn't always right, but his ability to foresee innovations was uncanny. Here are a few of his more remarkable predictions. AN INTERNET WORLD When he called it: 1985 Back when computers were just becoming personally affordable, Jobs...
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The Wilderness Years
Byline: Leander Kahney; Leander Kahney runs the website Cultofmac.com. The bleakest time in Jobs's career would turn out to be his most productive. The decade that Steve Jobs spent away from Apple is often seen as his "wilderness" years, a time...
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What Jobs Taught Me about the Value of Failure
Stay hungry. Stay foolish. Take risks. And whatever you do, don't be afraid to fall. On a sunny California morning in June 2005, my friends and I ran into the Stanford stadium for graduation. As part of the university's irreverent "wacky walk,"...
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World Wide Jobs
Byline: Josh Dzieza From tripping on LSD in India to discovering a mouse in Palo Alto, a global timeline of an inventor's life. Syria Early 1950s Abdulfattah Jandali, Jobs's father, leaves Syria to study at the University of Wisconsin, where...
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