Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 30

About Those Categories. in the Roberts Court's First Major Decision, the Ideas of Liberalism, Conservatism, Activism and Deference to Democracy Got Blurred
Byline: George F. Will For many months the nation has reverberated with the clanging certitudes that swirl around today's process of confirming Supreme Court justices. Last week the first major decision handed down by the Roberts Court demonstrated...
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A Fine Mess in Malibu; Charges of Smuggling Overshadow the Refurbished Getty Villa
Byline: Cathleen Mcguigan (With Barbie Nadeau, Eric Pape and Jennifer Ordonez) The old Getty villa in Malibu always had a wacky Hollywood vibe. A replica of a grand Roman house that was buried when Mount Vesuvius blew in A.D. 79, it looked so fabulously...
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An Incredible Marriage? Disney and Pixar's CEO Steve Jobs Talk of Joining Forces
Byline: David J. Jefferson Disney CEO Robert Iger believes in happily-ever-afters. For two years, Disney's relationship with Pixar Animation Studios--creator of such blockbusters as "Finding Nemo" and "Toy Story"--was on the rocks, soured by an...
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Baghdad's Big Oil Bust; It's Open Season on Iraq's Refineries and Pipelines
Byline: Scott Johnson and Michael Hastings (With Christopher Dickey in Paris) Guarding the Fatah oil refinery used to be a pretty straightforward job for Saif Mohammed. Insurgents hit only sporadically, and usually missed important targets. But...
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Batten Down the Insurance; in the Face of Total Loss to Your Home, You Might Learn That Your Coverage Isn't as Good as You Thought. Make Sure of What You're Covered For
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn (Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld) How "sure," exactly, is your homeowner's insurance? You buy policies that you believe will pay if you're burned out, or flooded out as Katrina's victims were. But in the face of a total...
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Betting on a Gusher; Putin Believes He Can Transform a Former State Gas Monopoly into a World-Class Energy Company
Byline: Owen Matthews (With Anna Nemtsova in Moscow) Vladimir Putin is betting big on oil and gas. for the first time in its 40-year history, the state gas giant Gazprom plans to allow foreign investors to buy its stock directly, perhaps as early...
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Cash on the Line; since 2003, Rosanne Cash Has Lost Her Father, Johnny-As Well as Her Mother and Her Stepmother. Her Striking New CD, 'Black Cadillac,' Is a Matter of Life and Death
Byline: Malcolm Jones Being the child of a celebrity means running into some part of your personal life every time you turn the corner. Being the child of a dead celebrity, as Rosanne Cash has discovered since her father's death in 2003, can drive...
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Health: Beating Back the Blues
Byline: Anna Kuchment Parnel Wickham wasn't getting much comfort from traditional psychotherapy. In the late 1990s her husband of 36 years walked out on her, her mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer's and she fell on financial hard times. "What happened...
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Hot Air in the Big Easy; the Mayor's Racial Comments Mar His Re-Election Bid
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores Peggy Wilson couldn't believe what she was hearing on the radio. Addressing a crowd on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Mayor Ray Nagin was claiming that God wanted New Orleans to remain majority black. "This city will be chocolate...
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If Martha Stewart Were a Geek
Byline: Steven Levy Ok, you've all got DVD players now. But before pondering the next step--Blu-ray? HD DVD? Downloaded movies?--give a thought to that old VHS player in the garage. The flashing "12:00" still pops up when you plug it in, doesn't...
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I Was out of a Job-And an Identity; Newly Retired, I Found That My Work Had Defined Me. A Class of Autistic Boys Taught Me to Change
Byline: Peter Borghesi (Borghesi lives in West Caldwell, N.J.) I got out of bed as usual. I shaved, showered and put on a clean shirt. Trotting out to the kitchen where my wife, Nadine, was standing, I looked at her and asked, "Now what?" The day...
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'Mommy, I Know You'; A Feminist Scholar Explains How the Study of Girls Can Teach Us about Boys
Byline: Carol Gilligan (Gilligan is the author of "In a Different Voice" and "The Birth of Pleasure." She is a university professor at NYU.) As the mother of three sons, I have attended my share of hand-wringing parent-teacher conferences. Having...
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NASCAR's Hot Numbers; Gearheads and Stats Pros Create a Racing 'Box Score.'
Byline: Daniel McGinn Until 2003, Stefan Kretschmann followed three sports: baseball, football and hockey. Then he watched his first NASCAR race. He was hooked. "I just love the strategy of it," he says. To better understand the action, Kretschmann...
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Newsmakers
Byline: Nicki Gostin (Marc Peyser) Angela Lansbury's latest role is the awful great-aunt Adelaide in the delightful new kid flick "Nanny McPhee." She talked with NEWSWEEK's Nicki Gostin. Why did you choose to play another villain? Angela Lansbury:...
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O'Connor's Rightful Heir? Kennedy May Check the Supreme Court's Tilt toward the Right
Byline: Evan Thomas And Stuart Taylor Jr. When conservative Washington lawyers who argue before the Supreme Court talk about "the Greenhouse Effect," they don't mean global warming. The Greenhouse in question is Linda Greenhouse, the longtime and...
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Our Bodies, Our Wires
Byline: Kay Itoi In his gadget-filled office at Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Prof. Kohji Mitsubayashi tells a visitor to touch a transmitter with one hand and a receiver with another. Voila! A jaunty TV jingle blares from attached speakers....
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Perspectives
"Operations are under preparation." Osama bin Laden, in an audiotape, warning that Al Qaeda was preparing new attacks on the United States "When you look at the way the House of Representatives has been run, it has been run like a plantation."...
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Politics: No Longer Lying Low, 'Rove Is in the House!'
Byline: Holly Bailey The Republican National Committee organized a forum for conservative bloggers earlier this month, telling attendees they'd be briefed by RNC Chairman Ken Mehlman and other party operatives on the 2006 political outlook. But...
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Predator and Prey; More Than Four Years after 9/11, Bin Laden Issues Another Threat. Can New Technology Help to Silence Him?
***** CORRECTION: Correction: In the Jan. 30 article "Predator and Prey," we misidentified the name of a book by William Blum. It is "Rogue State," not "Rogue Nation." NEWSWEEK regrets the errors. ***** Byline: Michael Hirsh, Mark Hosenball...
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Price Chopper; Can Dell's Low-Cost Model Work for Flat-Panel TVs?
Byline: Christian Caryl These days there is no product that embodies the ruthless, near-frictionless manufacturing machine of global capitalism more perfectly than the flat-panel TV. Sales are skyrocketing and prices plummeting in a market dominated...
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SAVING SOUL FOOD; Health-Conscious African-Americans Are Reinventing Classic Recipes. So Long, Pork Fat; Hello, Baked Chicken
Byline: Claudia Kalb and Anna Kuchment Sylvia Woods knows her soul food. For the past 40-plus years, she's been dishing out the best of it at her famed restaurant Sylvia's, in Harlem--the fried chicken, the macaroni and cheese, the sweet candied...
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She's Gotta Have Him; A Woman Agonizes about Race in 'Something New.'
Byline: Allison Samuels Interracial relationships aren't exactly new in Hollywood movies--remember "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner"? But what was the last romantic comedy in which the babe was black and the hunk was white? The aptly titled "Something...
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Technology: Searching for Searches; the Government Is Demanding Millions of Your Queries. AOL, Yahoo and Microsoft Have Coughed Up. Google Is Resisting
Byline: Steven Levy Civil-liberties advocates reeling from the recent revelations on surveillance had something else to worry about last week: the privacy of the billions of search queries made on sites like Google, AOL, Yahoo and Micro- soft. As...
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The Bush Battle Plan; It's the War, Stupid. the Strategy for Election 2006
Byline: Richard Wolffe And Holly Bailey For any White House aide, it should have been an easy crowd: a group of pro-Bush business lobbyists at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, a short walk from the West Wing. But when chief of staff Andy Card delivered...
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The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker When we asked her to write this week's cover story about the increasing trouble boys are having in school, Peg Tyre thought she should tell her own sons: Mac, 13, and Mose, 10. "What does she know about it?" Mac asked his brother...
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The Last Battle? Why a New War over DVD Formats May Not Matter
Byline: Christian Caryl Headlines from the consumer Electronics Show in Vegas screamed: gloves off in digital war. Electronics makers choose sides in battle. The contest is over the $15 billion DVD industry, with the winner to set the standard for...
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The Other Big Brother; the Pentagon Has Its Own Domestic Spying Program. Even Its Leaders Say the Outfit May Have Gone Too Far
Byline: Michael Isikoff The demonstration seemed harmless enough. Late on a June afternoon in 2004, a motley group of about 10 peace activists showed up outside the Houston headquarters of Halliburton, the giant military contractor once headed by...
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The Trouble with Boys; They're Kinetic, Maddening and Failing at School. Now Educators Are Trying New Ways to Help Them Succeed
***** CORRECTION: Correction: In "The Trouble with Boys" (Jan. 30), we misattributed the photos of Eagle Academy in the Bronx that appear on pages 51 and 52. They were taken by Jesse Chehak, not Matt Gunther. NEWSWEEK regrets the error. *****...
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Till Faucets Do Us Part; Warning: Remodeling Can Wreck a Marriage
Byline: Karen Breslau On television decorating shows, the featured couple is inevitably cheerful and agreeable: cooing as they examine tile samples, nudging each other with mutual delight as they shop for chandeliers. But as anyone who has been...
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Time to Face Reality on Iran; at Best, a Military Strike Would Set Back Iran's Program a Few Years, Inflame Public Opinion There and Unify the Nation in Its Bid to Go Nuclear
Byline: Fareed Zakaria (Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com.) The huffing and puffing in Washington is so strong these days, it could start a gale. High officials warn Iran not to continue work on its nuclear program. Politicians on both...
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Woman of Iron and Silk; Israel's New Foreign Minister Was Raised on the Idea of Greater Israel. Now She's Working with a Different Map
Byline: Lally Weymouth Tzipi Livni is a rising star in Israel. She was one of Ariel Sharon's favorite colleagues--the first person he asked to join his new party, Kadima. She's also very popular among Israeli voters, who consider her honest and...
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Zucker's Busy New Office; NBC's CEO Is Working Fast to Revive the Peacock Network's Fortunes. Will His Moves Be a Big Hit?
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts NBC typically doesn't rely on an idiot boss to dig itself out of a hole. But as chairman Bob Wright recently noted, these are "desperate" times. So for help NBC turned to "The Office," a ratings-challenged sitcom from...
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