Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 152, No. 22, December 1

An Actress Moves on, or Tries To
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh You can almost touch the sadness in Michelle Williams's movie 'Wendy and Lucy.' Michelle Williams disappears so deeply into her new movie "Wendy and Lucy," it's like you're watching a documentary. Williams plays Wendy,...
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A Path out of the Woods
Byline: Fareed Zakaria We need China to see that its interests are aligned with America's. If not, things could get very, very ugly. For weeks the world has eagerly awaited word from the Obama transition team about the people who will head up...
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A Plan for Hard Times: Print Cash
Byline: Tony Dokoupil People nationwide may start hoarding their cash as recession fears grow. But in Riverwest--a progressive enclave of Milwaukee--residents have another answer to their money trouble: they'll print their own. The proposed River...
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Don't Get Depressed, It's Not 1929
Byline: Daniel Gross Instead of out-of-work men asking, 'Brother, can you spare a dime?' we have executives asking Congress if it can spare $100 billion. It's difficult to avoid the ubiquitous comparisons between the current sad state of financial...
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Even Sinatra Took Some Cues from Q
Quincy Jones--musician, producer, Oprah's BFF--has put his life (including his school report cards) into a coffee-table book: "The Complete Quincy Jones: My Journey and Passions.'' He spoke to Allison Samuels: You had a rough childhood. My dad...
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Get a Life, Doc, If You Dare
Byline: Mary Carmichael Residents are often too busy wiping the noses and taking the temperatures of other people's kids to do the same for their own. There's an e-mail making the rounds with a job description attached. If you apply, be warned:...
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Heading for a Wipeout
Byline: Caitlin McDevitt The airlines' new fees for baggage will hit skiers hard--and ski-equipment retailers aren't happy. Eddy Korbel has spent 14 years in what might seem an especially challenging profession: selling ski equipment to the perpetually...
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How to Find Your Post-50 Job
Byline: Linda Stern Retirement is so overrated. Study after study shows that the current generation of 50somethings wants to keep working, and for the majority who are doing work requiring more brain than brawn, it won't hurt. "You're not mining...
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It's Not All Downhill
Byline: Linda Stern You've seen the commercials: hippie vans, long flowing hair, Woodstock music and rhetoric about "the generation that swore it would never grow old." As members of the postwar cohort head into their 60s and beyond, marketers are...
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Just One More Frame!
Byline: Suzanne Smalley; With Katie Connolly and Sarah Kliff How do you raise kids in the White House and 'keep them normal,' too? The White House may be the most important center of power in the world. But it's also just a home, a place that...
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Katrina Kids: Sickest Ever
Byline: Mary Carmichael Even before the storm, they were some of the country's neediest kids. Now, the children of Katrina who stayed longest in ramshackle government trailer parks in Baton Rouge are "the sickest I have ever seen in the U.S.," says...
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Know How to Set Limits
One of the joys of retiring is spending time with your grandchildren. But these relationships don't always come cheap. Matthew Tuttle, a certified financial planner and author of "Financial Secrets of My Wealthy Grandparents," sees a lot of older clients...
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Laughing in the Face of Change
Byline: Carlos Mencia; Mencia, creator of Comedy Central's "Mind of Mencia," is on an 80-city tour. By trading a secure career for his passion, this comic found himself. Right now, a lot of people are losing their jobs. They're saying, "Oh, my...
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Let's Stop the Whining
Byline: Fake Steve Jobs; Fake Steve Jobs is the alter ego of NEWSWEEK's Daniel Lyons. Yes, batteries suck. But the iPhone is still a piece of heaven in your pocket. I can't believe I'm saying this, but for once I actually agree with something...
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Let's Talk Touchdowns
Byline: Daniel McGinn In a down economy, a networking guru is hosting Football 101 tutorials. Her theory: being able to discuss sports may spur friendships and help build careers. As soon as the invitation arrived, Joy Cline Phinney began to...
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Letter? I Never Got Any Letter, Herbert
Byline: Jonathan Alter Before his Inaugural, FDR craftily dodged attempts to saddle him with Hoover's crisis. What Obama can learn. Americans are scared and eager for change. They elect the Democratic presidential candidate by a healthy margin,...
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Mamet Stage Direction
Byline: Jeremy McCarter To speed the play, think poetry, not potty mouths. David Mamet writes plays and movies and TV shows about tough guys. When he came out as a conservative, he did so in the lefty Village Voice, which was a tough-guy thing...
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No Headline
Byline: Weston Kosova "It's the talk of the town -- Where will President-elect Barack Obama and his wife, Michelle, decide to send 10-year-old daughter Malia and 7-year-old daughter Sasha to school when they move into the White House?" --The Washington...
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No Small Task for Eric Holder
The new attorney general will face tremendous pressure to go after those who authorized torture. The U.S. Justice Department faces an internal crisis in morale and a public crisis in credibility. And while every Justice Department pushes its political...
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Now We're Cooking with -- Batteries
Byline: Keith Naughton; With Patrick Crowley and Hilary Shenfeld Electric storage is the weak link in a high-tech world. Fixing it could improve our lives--and the planet. The energizer bunny is nowhere to be found inside the suburban Milwaukee...
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Obama's Nuclear Reservations
Byline: Daren Briscoe Political squabbling over how to store waste could hold back the industry. It was one of Barack Obama's big applause lines. At nearly every campaign stop, the candidate promised to end our dependence on foreign oil and slash...
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Obama to Take on Torture?
Byline: Michael Isikoff Despite the hopes of many human-rights advocates, the new Obama Justice Department is not likely to launch major new criminal probes of harsh interrogations and other alleged abuses by the Bush administration. But one idea...
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Perspectives
"She's ready." A confidant of Hillary Rodham Clinton, after reports that the senator will give up her seat to become secretary of state in the Obama administration "Until they show us the plan, we cannot show them the money." Speaker of the...
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President 2.0
Byline: Daniel Lyons and Daniel Stone; With Barrett Sheridan Obama harnessed the grass-roots power of the Web to get elected. How will he use that power now? Barack Obama is the first major politician who really "gets" the Internet. Sure, Howard...
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Putting Idle Hands to Work
Author and activist Van Jones says the quest for cleaner energy can create big job gains right now. For the Obama administration, aggressively pursuing a new energy strategy will be a top priority. Environmental activist Van Jones, author of "The...
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Senior Discounts Go beyond the Multiplex
Byline: Linda Stern If you can force yourself to admit that you're a senior, you can cash in on discounts on everything from cell phones to ski trips. That doesn't sound so old, right? The oft-ridiculed senior-citizen discount is alive and well...
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Show-and-Tell Time
Byline: Evan Thomas and Pat Wingert He's promised to bring change to Washington, but does Obama's calculus include D.C.'s awful schools? When the time came to find new schools for their two daughters, Michelle and Barack Obama did not even look...
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TARP and ADD
Byline: George F. Will Congress has made bureaucrats into legislators; or perhaps it has made Hank Paulson into the fourth branch of government. It is futile, but not pointless, to note that the federal government's blizzard of bail-outs is unconstitutional....
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The Editor's Desk
Byline: Daniel Klaidman Writing in The New York Times, columnist David Brooks lightly mocked the phenomenon as "O-phoria," the wall-to-wall coverage of Barack Obama's election--the insta-books, the quickie documentaries and, yes, the magazine covers....
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The Greener Way to Pay
Byline: Daniel Stone Printing cash consumes energy, but it beats credit. It takes an enormous quantity of energy to print, transport, count and sort the dollar bills in your wallet. The U.S. Bureau of Printing and Engraving cranks out $750 million...
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The Paper Chasers
Byline: Daniel Lyons Isn't it ironic: Xerox is hoping it can profit by teaching companies how to reduce their printing. It's Sophie Vandebroek's favorite magic trick. Vandebroek, the chief technology officer at Xerox, is standing before a roomful...
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The Picture of Health
Byline: Kim Lute; Lute lives in Atlanta. Conventionally speaking, I'm unhealthy. But perhaps it's time we redefined the word. On a recent Monday morning, I underwent a routine liver biopsy. I changed into one of those awful hospital gowns, signed...
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What Michelle Means to Us
Byline: Allison Samuels ***** Correction: In our Dec. 1 story "What Michelle Means to Us" we said that Michelle Obama would grace the March cover of Vogue. While Vogue has in fact been in discussions with her representatives about appearing on...
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When DNA Is Not Destiny
Byline: Sharon Begley Experiences can silence genes or activate them. Even shyness is like Silly Putty once life gets hold of it. "Personality must be accepted for what it is," Oscar Wilde counseled. "You mustn't mind that a poet is a drunk."...
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When Left Is Right
Byline: Julia Baird Rachel Maddow always thought she was an outsider. How did she become a star? "Can you believe that sellout, Barack Obama?" says Rachel Maddow, looking around the room. "Let's hit him from the left!" It's 1:30 p.m. on Nov....
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Who's Watching the Money?
Byline: Michael Hirsh and Daniel Gross With the economy worsening and the Bush team adrift, queasy markets are looking to Obama to set the course. But is naming a Treasury secretary enough? Barack Obama thought he could have a fairly normal transition....
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You Can Go Home Again
After 31 years in a corporate job in Manhattan, I'm taking huge risks to open a diner in faraway Maine. If I'm lucky, my family will have a better, simpler life. It hit me one day in 2005 walking up Eighth Avenue on my way to work at NEWSWEEK. During...
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