Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 156, No. 21, November 22

All about Mea
Byline: Jacob Weisberg W. doesn't sweat much, except history. Upon leaving office, the U.S. president moves quickly into a new job: press agent for his past. None openly acknowledge this role, and few fail to become obsessed with it. By tradition,...
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Back to the Genetic Future
Byline: Sharon Begley Why family medical history is key. In this age of DNA, with for-profit companies scanning customers' genomes for DNA variants associated with disease and the "$1,000 genome" within reach, it seems positively antediluvian...
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Bag Wars
Byline: Dana Thomas LVMH's Bernard Arnault has an insatiable appetite for luxury brands. Now the 'wolf in cashmere' is licking his chops over one of the last family-controlled companies in the business: Hermes. Will he win, and turn class to mass?...
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Bunga-Bunga Nation
Byline: Barbie Nadeau As a media magnate and prime minister, Silvio Berlusconi has spent decades reshaping the country in his own image. The result is not a pretty sight. It's 8:30 p.m., and all eyes turn to Italy's most popular satirical news...
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'Deathly Hallows'? Try Deadly Boring
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh The new Harry Potter movie starts with a close-up shot of the Minister of Magic, who barks: "These are dark times. There's no denying it." You're obviously supposed to notice the 2010 subtext, but it's hard to make that leap...
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Europe Still Has Too Many Chiefs
Byline: William Underhill Good news for true believers in the European Union: this week President Obama will make an appearance at an EU-U.S. meeting in Lisbon. Europhiles haven't forgotten Obama's previous blow to the bloc's prestige when Washington...
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Hail to the Chiefs
Byline: Daniel Stone The presidency has grown, and grown and grown, into the most powerful, most impossible job in the world. In 1936 Franklin Roosevelt felt overwhelmed. The New Deal had begun to spawn dozens of new agencies, and Roosevelt,...
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'I Do'? I Don't!
Byline: Eve Conant Brian Brown is leading the fight against gay marriage. And succeeding. Brian Brown's hate mail is divided into two categories: messages that go straight to the police and those he dumps into a growing computer file labeled...
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Jews You Can Use
Byline: Jerry Adler There is no particular reason why the National Museum of American Jewish History should be located in Philadelphia, rather than, say, Brooklyn, except that it happened to have been founded there in 1976, by members of Congregation...
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Keeping It Local
Byline: Julie Halpert "Locally made" is a popular term for budding entrepreneurs with romantic notions of taking a product in their community and turning it into a profitable business. But transforming a local gem into a cash cow takes more than...
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The Pillaged Voice
Byline: David Ansen In a business notoriously obsessed with youth, where it's not uncommon for screenwriters to lie about their age to win a job, David Seidler is a stunning anomaly. At 73, he finds himself, for the first time in his career, a hot...
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The Warrior's Brain
Byline: Andrew Bast What happens when PTSD and battlefield concussions collide? The worst was the day Brooke Brown came home to find her husband with a shotgun in his mouth. But there had been many bad days since Lance Cpl. David Brown had returned...
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Truth or Consequences
Byline: Evan Thomas Obama's only real hope to be an effective president and secure his legacy: talk straight about the looming economic disaster facing the country. Two years into his presidency, Barack Obama remains a remote, even mysterious...
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War-Toy Wishes
Byline: John Barry As Lockheed Martin's Marietta, Ga., plant prepares to begin building the 187th--and last--F-22 super-fighter, the military is already dreaming of its successor. In a query to the aerospace industry earlier this month, the Air...
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Why It's So Risky
Byline: Pat Wingert "Blackout in a can." That's what kids call the fruity caffeinated-alcohol drinks that offer a cheap, fast way to get drunk and party all night. As safety concerns grow, so does the pressure to pull these potent products from...
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Why Japan Fell.And What It Teaches Us
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson It's hard to remember that in the 1980s Japan had the world's most admired economy. It would, people widely believed, achieve the highest living standards and pioneer the niftiest technologies. Nowadays, all we hear are...
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