Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 21

A Grittier Trip to the Holy Land
Byline: Sarina Rosenberg The Israel that 18,000 young Jewish Americans will see this summer on the free, 10-day trip offered by Taglit-birthright Israel is a land of ancient religious sites, sandy beaches and buff young soldiers. "It's a Jewish...
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A Portrait of Faith; with 'JESUS OF NAZARETH,' Pope Benedict XVI Fights Back against 'The Dictatorship of Relativism' by Showing the World His Vision of the Definitive Truth of Christ
Byline: Lisa Miller (With Julie Scelfo) Who was Jesus, really? It has become acceptable, even fashionable, lately to speak of the Christian Lord in casual terms, as though he were an acquaintance with a mysterious past. Pope Benedict's trip to Brazil...
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A Whacking Leaves HBO in Crisis
Byline: Devin Gordon and Johnnie L. Roberts Everyone at HBO knew they were about to lose a celebrated patriarch, a cornerstone of the network, and they even knew the date it would happen: June 10, the night of the series finale of "The Sopranos."...
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Back from the Dead; an Artist Dies, the Work's on Life Support. Should the Living Make It Get Up and Walk?
Byline: David Gates and Jac Chebatoris When Charles Dickens died in 1870, he was publishing monthly installments of a novel called "The Mystery of Edwin Drood." He left no hint of who did the murder--or if there was a murder--so several people kindly...
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Barry Bonds's Enhancement
Byline: George F. Will Would that Barry Bonds had retired after the 1998 season. He might be happier than he seems to be in his long trudge toward tainted glory. Certainly everyone who cares about baseball, and about the integrity of athletic competition...
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BeliefWatch: Entombed
Byline: Lisa Miller In interviews with NEWSWEEK in the days before the announcement of the "Jesus family tomb" (the suburban Jerusalem cave said to contain the bones of Jesus and his relatives, a claim that later turned out to be overblown), publishers...
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Easy Money, A Click Away
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn (Reporter Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld) If you're still picking your bank by whether there's a handy branch nearby, you haven't joined the 21st century. Branches are nice, especially when you've got a good book to read while...
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Fencing out the Detainees
Byline: Dan Ephron As democrats try to shut down the detention facility at GuantAnamo Bay, a few GOP congressmen are already gearing for the next battle: ensuring the detainees don't end up in their districts. In the past two weeks, Democrats have...
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Left Eye's Fatal Vision
Byline: Allison Samuels Lisa Lopes was a sad, tortured person--that much was clear after the TLC singer burned down her boyfriend's mansion in Atlanta back in 1994. But until you've seen the documentary "Last Days of Left Eye" (premiering May 19...
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Love on a Shoestring: Our $150 Wedding; with a Lot of Love and a Little Cash, My Husband and I Had the Marriage Ceremony of Our Dreams
Byline: Mary Beth Baptiste You might call me a minimalist, or just plain cheap, but when I set out to plan my recent wedding I didn't want anything elaborate. My husband-to-be, Richard, agreed, although he did harbor a wish for a Vegas drive-through...
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Mail Call: Love of God in the Time of War
Our May 7 cover story on keeping faith while on the battle lines drew a wide-ranging discussion on God's role in war. Many took issue with Army Chaplain Roger Benimoff's claim that he began hating God during his experience in Iraq. "War, like many...
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Meet the Next Billionaires; Calling All Geeks! Do You Have a Hot Idea for a Start-Up? If So, This Boot Camp Where Silicon Valley Meets 'American Idol' Is for You. That Is, If You Make the Cut
Byline: Steven Levy Sitting at the long trestle tables in Y Combinator's Mountain View, Calif., headquarters last January, the Weeblies felt wobbly. Back home at Penn State, the three undergraduates were alpha geeks, go-getters who'd capitalized...
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Netroots Renewed; Alums from Dean's Internet Staff Are Helping 2008 Candidates Succeed Where Their Previous Boss Failed
Byline: Andrew Romano Joe Rospars, a Howard Dean Web strategist, was at Vermont HQ when he got the bad news. The calls came from co-workers who'd flown out to Iowa, a week before the 2004 caucuses, to help. Sure, they said, Dean's Net team lured...
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Oh, Grow Up Already; 'Paprika' Is a Delicious Animated Film-For Adults. Why Can't Americans Stop All Their Mickey Mouse Stuff?
Byline: David Ansen This Friday "Shrek the Third" will swagger into theaters, its eye on the prize of seizing its predecessor's crown as the most successful animated film in history. A few days later, with far less fanfare, "Paprika," the work of...
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Paranoid in Tehran; Labor Organizers, Feminists, Party Animals, Visiting Scholars-Iran's Hard-Liners See Enemies on Every Side
Byline: Dan Ephron and Maziar Bahari Shaul Bakhash told himself the ordeal was almost over. In calls and e-mails, the George Mason University professor's wife, Haleh Esfandiari, 67, said she hoped to be home in Maryland soon, free at last after...
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Perspectives
"Hand on heart, I did what I thought was right." British Prime Minister Tony Blair, announcing he will step down on June 27, after more than a decade in office "As for the one Mormon running for office, those that really believe in God will...
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Prison Blues; A Surge in Arrests Is Raising New Questions about Iraqi Jails-And Heightening Concerns among U.S. Officials
Byline: Babak Dehghanpisheh (With Melinda Liu and Iraqi staff in Baghdad) Abdul Rahman Shimmari was getting ready for bed one night last March when the cops kicked in his door. They jabbed him with AK-47s and punched him in the face as he cried...
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(Rethinking) Gender; A Growing Number of Americans Are Taking Their Private Struggles with Their Identities into the Public Realm. How Those Who Believe They Were Born with the Wrong Bodies Are Forcing Us to Re-Examine What It Means to Be Male and Female
Byline: This story was written by Debra Rosenberg, with Reporting from Lorraine Ali, Mary Carmichael, Samantha Henig, Raina Kelley, Matthew Philips, Julie Scelfo, Kurt Soller, Karen Springen And Lynn Waddell Growing up in Corinth, Miss., J. T. Hayes...
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Saving Your Seed Money
Byline: Linda Stern William Alexander once spent $1,219 to produce 19 perfect heirloom tomatoes in his garden. He got a book out of it: "The $64 Tomato" (Algonquin; $13.95). Luckily, the book helped him recoup some of his green, though he still...
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Stopping a Kid Killer; A Concoction Called 'Cheese' Has Led to 21 Deaths in the Dallas Area, and Authorities Worry It Will Spread
Byline: Catharine Skipp and Arian Campo-Flores Nick Cannata finally seemed to be pulling his life together. A bright kid and talented artist, he had plunged into a spiral of drug use in his early teens after his parents' divorce--marijuana, cocaine,...
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The Democrats' Trade Troubles
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Last week house speaker Nancy Pelosi and congress-man Charles Rangel showed genuine leadership by making a deal with the Bush administration to ease the passage of new trade pacts. But they did so from within a party that...
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The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham When you are in the business of reporting on social trends," says Julie Scelfo , who worked on our cover this week, "you certainly hear about every last kind of subculture and event, but only occasionally do these things rise...
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The Island of Dreams; Once the Main Gateway to America, Ellis Island Is Getting Another Fix-Up
Byline: Ramin Setoodeh A century ago, if you immigrated to America by ship, the most important part of your journey was the six-minute medical inspection at Ellis Island in New York Harbor. You'd walk past a row of inspectors, each looking for a...
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The Threat in Our Midst
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Mark Hosenball The men who gathered inside the small Bronx apartment were tense, and they chatted nervously before the ceremony. The participants, among them a New York City musician and an emergency-room doctor from...
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The Truths We Want to Deny
Byline: Sharon Begley A man who resented his parents' favoritism toward his younger brother was receiving psychotherapy in Boston for relationship problems. His therapist thought they were making progress, but she knew a problem loomed. Pregnant,...
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Welcome to the Club; Philip K. Dick Would Be Amazed to Find Himself in the Library of America. That's Only One Reason He Belongs
Byline: Malcolm Jones If there is anyone who would not understand Philip K. Dick's inclusion in the Library of America--those uniform editions of what the Library calls the "best and most significant" American literature--it would be Dick himself....
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With the Best of Intentions; Paul Wolfowitz Has Always Wanted to Change the World-One Big Idea at a Time
Byline: Michael Hirsh He started out well. Conscious that he had image issues--he was the Ugly American architect of the unpopular Iraq War--Paul Wolfowitz, the now embattled World Bank president, ate lunch in the employees' mess hall rather than...
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