Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 11, March 15

Cathy McMorris Rodgers
Byline: Michelle Cottle A Republican woman takes on her party's men. Being a Republican woman has had its rocky moments over the past several months. Consider, then, the awesome burden that now falls on Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, the newly...
Read preview Overview
Drug Testing for Congressmen
Byline: Paul Begala A modest proposal in response to an obnoxious one. So Congressman Stephen Fincher has come up with an idea. Not a new one, to be sure, but Washington today is a Sahara of ideas, so every idea is welcome. Fincher, a Republican...
Read preview Overview
Evolution Bites the Dust
Byline: Trevor Butterworth Mites are regressing. Could humans do so, too? Dust mites are known as tiny scavengers, living on the vast pall of dead skin shed by the animal world--and while they clean up the world in their own little way, they...
Read preview Overview
!Francis!
Byline: A.N. Wilson A Jesuit pope, a golden opportunity for change. Habemus Papam! The first Jesuit. The first pope from the Americas. And, at first, bafflement on St. Peter's Square since Jorge Mario Bergoglio wasn't exactly a household name....
Read preview Overview
Gut Putt? Tut-Tut!
Byline: Luke Kerr-Dineen A proposed rule sparks revolt in the golfing world. When Keegan Bradley won the 2011 PGA Championship--one of golf's four major tournaments--he became the first player to win a major using what's known in the golfing...
Read preview Overview
Heart of Culture
Byline: Maya Jaggi The Congo hosts a celebration of African arts. Brazzaville's corniche, a once elegant drive with an air of abandonment, looks out over the Congo River, the immense silted waterway that shaped the destiny of equatorial Africa....
Read preview Overview
He's a Rebel
Byline: Vikram Jayanti Phil Spector's Last Stand It's a story as old as justice. The crazy man crying out, "It's not fair!"--his calls falling deaf ears. Now it's Phil Spector's story too, about to be twice-told anew, once in his last-chance...
Read preview Overview
Is He Jesus?
Byline: Benjamin Lytal J.M. Coetzee portrays the son of God in his new novel. J.M. Coetzee's new novel is a return to form. More than that: it may be his most brisk and dazzling book. Opening in the key of Kafka, the novel creeps into a nail-biting...
Read preview Overview
Like We Love Him
Byline: Andrew Romano How Justin Timberlake grew into America's favorite pop star. zjustin Timberlake is our biggest male pop star. I realized this for the first time the other day. It hit me during the final leg of Timberlake's dizzying campaign...
Read preview Overview
Obama in Zion
Byline: Peter Beinart The president needs to charm Israelis--but also scare them. It's a cliche that every newly elected president takes office determined to rectify his predecessor's mistakes. It's less common for a newly reelected president...
Read preview Overview
Once upon a Time in Venezuela
Byline: Roger Lowenstein A writer revisits the complex land that gave us Hugo Chavez. On my first assignment for The Daily Journal, the English-language newspaper in Caracas, I found my way to the Venezuelan Congress, a gem of colonial architecture...
Read preview Overview
St. Petersburg, Miracle on Marshland
Byline: Josip Novakovich Peter the Great patterned the city after Amsterdam, and even though St. Petersburg is newer than New York by almost 100 years, in some places it feels a thousand years old--a few buildings seem to be a cross between Roman...
Read preview Overview
Sweet Truth
Byline: Kent Sepkowitz Why experts know what's best for your health. Mayor Michael Bloomberg's administration received a major setback March 11 when a judge halted its plan to limit the size of sugary drinks in New York City. The mayor had hoped...
Read preview Overview
The Newsroom
Byline: Daniel Klaidman Few days before the start of the Iraq War, I was summoned to the Pentagon, along with other senior editors for major U.S. news organizations. The message from Victoria Clarke, Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld's spokesperson,...
Read preview Overview
The Speechwriter
Byline: David Frum My youngest daughter was born in December 2001: a war baby. When my wife nursed little Beatrice in the middle of the night, she'd hear F-16s patrolling the Washington skies. A few weeks before, a sniper had terrorized the Washington...
Read preview Overview
What's in a Name?
Byline: Candida Moss The new pope's choice of 'Francis' hints at the direction of his reign. Enter Pope Francis. The first Jesuit pope. The first from Latin America. It is, indeed, a historic moment for the papacy. Those who waited for a leader...
Read preview Overview
'You Just Have to Have It!'
Byline: Megan McArdle $2,000 to make coffee? $800 to boil rice? In any color you'd like! Inside the American housewares craze. The Kenwood Cooking Chef looks sort of like a cross between a stand mixer and a movie robot. It can chop, slice, shred,...
Read preview Overview