Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 12, March 22

After the Flood
Byline: Andrew Romano can we continue to live where nature doesn't want us? The sand was the thing we noticed first. Mostly because it hadn't been there at all yesterday, or any day before yesterday, and now it was absolutely everywhere. For...
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A Holy Book
Byline: Mac Margolis A pope and a rabbi begin a conversation ... Newly enthroned, his papal whites barely wrinkled, Francis I has taken the Roman Catholic world by storm. Vaticanistas parse the pontiff's every gesture and genuflection, but the...
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All for $100
Byline: Michael Moynihan The eventful life of Harry Reems. Obscenity, supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart famously declared, is difficult to define but rather easy to identify. One knows it when one sees it. British philosopher Bertrand Russell...
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America's Latest Renaissance Man
Byline: Buzz Bissinger Even in the baddest bad-ass behavior of his basketball days, when his hair looked like flame and his enormous piercings seemed made from a chain-link fence and it was always hard to divide his reality from his calculated ridiculous,...
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Around the World in Six Ideas
Byline: Christopher Dickey Losing Our Religion Americans are not giving up on God (only about 3 percent are atheists). But a growing number are turning away from organized religion. According to a recent survey, 20 percent say they have no religious...
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A Tarnished Icon
Byline: Kamil Tchorek Lech Walesa brought down Communist Poland, but now he's besmirching his own reputation. By 1984, Lech Walesa was an icon. A Polish shipyard electrician with modest farming roots, he had come from nowhere to inspire a workers'...
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Check, Please!
Byline: Michael Tomasky America's restaurant technology is worse than Polynesia's. It happened again not long ago. We went out to dinner and had a perfectly pleasant meal. We were sated. Ready to go. Then we sat. And I wondered what I always...
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Death of a Facebook Activist
Byline: Mike Giglio Did Morsi's government cover up a political murder? Mohamed al-Gendy, a popular activist, was last seen alive at around 2:30 a.m. January 28, when he said good night to a journalist friend near Cairo's Tahrir Square and headed...
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Gritty Glamour
Byline: Isabel Wilkinson Marilyn Minter has something to say--and the art world is finally listening. When i arrive at Marilyn Minter's Manhattan studio on an unseasonably warm March afternoon, the artist is presiding over her assistants the...
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Habemus Papam? Habemus Controversy!
Byline: Fania Oz-Salzberger Why Jews could never have a pope. In our co-authored book, Jews and Words (Yale, 2012), my father, Israeli novelist Amos Oz, and I, a historian of ideas, combined our differing outlooks to propose a new take on Jewish...
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Jurassic Republicans
Byline: Paul Begala Can the GOP escape from 1955? In his new biography of Roger Ailes, Zev Chafets writes that Ailes longs for America when it was "its natural, best self, which he locates, with modest social amendments, somewhere in midwestern...
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Little Island, Big Problem
Byline: Steve H. Hanke The financial crisis in Cyprus has global ramifications. Who's going to bail out Cyprus: Brussels or Moscow? That's the multibillion-dollar question. In mid-March, the European Union and the International Monetary Fund...
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Mumbai: Please Call It Bombay
Byline: Dilip D'Souza It's just a nondescript shed. But if there's a more telling descriptor of my city's essence, of a certain schizophrenia that runs in the veins of some of us who call this place home, I have yet to find it. Tucked on a quiet...
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Pakistan's Woman Warrior
Byline: Christopher Dickey Accused of blasphemy, Sherry Rehman fights back. "Blasphemy." When you hear that word in America, it conjures up visions of the Salem witch trials or, worse, the Middle Ages and the Inquisition. It is not a word that's...
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Tabloid Man
Byline: Michael Daly Nora Ephron's last work comes to Broadway. There he was up on stage, Mike McAlary, brought back to life by Tom Hanks with uncanny accuracy, a moustache making him look like the New York newspaper columnist who fought a losing...
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The Baroness of Bebop
Byline: Liesl Schillinger Hannah Rothschild on the trail of her elusive, bohemian relative. During a trip to New York in 1948 or 1949 (the fog of the decades has obscured the precise year), the British-born Baroness Pannonica "Nica" de Koenigswarter...
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There Be Dragons Here
Byline: Jace Lacob The complex new season of 'Game of Thrones.' When it launched in 2011, HBO's fantasy drama Game of Thrones quickly became part of the global collective consciousness, an often brutally violent and staggeringly beautiful series...
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Wait before You Date
Byline: Trevor Butterworth Is middle school too early for kids to couple up? Teen romance may have been dissected a million ways by popular culture, but that dubious analysis pales in comparison to a recent study that followed the arc of teen...
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Wang Yi
Byline: Melinda Liu A top diplomat on a tough assignment. Wang Yi is urbane, multilingual, pragmatic, and, when needed, a wily negotiator. In short: he is everything a top diplomat should be. And that is a good thing, because as China's new foreign...
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