Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 161, No. 31, August 30

A Living Soviet Museum
Byline: Brandon Presser Welcome to Transnistria, the place that time forgot. Our van slows under a large red and green banner embossed with a gilded hammer and sickle. We had left Chisinau, Moldova's capital, at sunrise, and after more than two...
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Arsenio Is Back
Byline: Winston Ross The millennials may not know him. But watch out: the adventurous television host returns. When it was my turn to ask Arsenio Hall a question, I scanned my list: He'd already covered how this show might be different from the...
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Art's Big Road Trip
Byline: Isabel Wilkinson Doug Aitken's 'Station to Station' throws artists, musicians, and everything in between on a cross-country train to see what sticks. Four years ago multimedia artist Doug Aitken began thinking about the experience of...
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Bill De Who?
Byline: David Freedlander After a surprising, meteoric rise in the polls, Bill de Blasio is suddenly on the brink of becoming New York's next mayor. What does he really believe? "I am going to talk about Joseph Stiglitz every chance I get!" Bill...
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Exporting Homophobia
Byline: Nico Hines A British parliamentarian accuses Moscow of diplomatic shenanigans and bigotry. A senior British politician has accused Russian officials of trying to have him removed from his post as the head of an influential parliamentary...
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From Professor to Savior
Byline: Daniel Gross Can Raghuram Rajan rescue India's economy? And you thought your first week of work was tough. Imagine taking the helm of the central bank of the world's second-most-populous country and its 10th-largest economy at a time...
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Go Big or Stay Home
Byline: Kenneth M. Pollack On Syria, there aren't many good options. But the president has chosen the worst of them all. The complexities of the Syria conflict touch on American interests in myriad ways--ways that don't necessarily line up neatly...
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One Direction, Super Sized
Byline: Kevin Fallon Morgan Spurlock shows us how the boy band got larger than life. Who are One Direction's biggest fans? There's 14-year-old Crystal Pineda, who began camping out on the streets of New York City six days before the British pop...
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Portrait of the Photojournalist
Byline: Kara Cutruzzula Behind the haunting images of Steve McCurry. "I've never been interested in accumulating stamps in my passport," says Steve McCurry, who nonetheless has gone through many little blue books during his decades as a photojournalist...
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The Bachelor
Byline: Andrew Romano Could Cory Booker be elected president without getting married? A promising politician from a mid-Atlantic state remains unmarried. At some point in his career, rumors begin to fly. Rivals question his masculinity, his mannerisms,...
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The Italian Idol
Byline: Barbie Latza Nadeau Forget about age, baldness, or any lines on his face--actor Toni Servillo is adored, admired, and desired. To his moviegoing compatriots, he is the sexiest star since Sophia Loren--despite a soaring forehead, a bald...
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The Last Hurrah
Byline: Emma Garman The poshest book you'll read this year is also a charming account of a lost world. Any notion that 20th-century British aristos weren't really eccentric, stiff-upper-lipped animal lovers who led utterly charmed lives of luxury,...
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The Oddball
Byline: Eleanor Clift Tom Coburn, the Senate's least predictable member, surprises Washington yet again. The receptionist answers the phone "Dr. Coburn" when you call the senator's office, underscoring the importance he attaches to his hometown...
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Too Radical for the Taliban
Byline: Sami Yousafzai and Ron Moreau A high-level fighter accuses his fellow militants of going soft--and engineers a schism that could have major consequences for Afghanistan. It was early November 2001, and--with the onslaught of a Northern...
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