Papers on Language & Literature

Literary history, theory, and interpretation.

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 3, Summer

Henry Roth's National and Personal Narratives of Captivity
Henry Roth, who died in 1995 at age 89, was the author of Call It Sleep (1934), Shifting Landscape (1987), and a multi-volume novel, Mercy of a Rude Stream, published between 1994 and 1998. Most of the significant questions concerning Roth's artistic...
Ironic Mysticism in Don DeLillo's Ratner's Star
It must always remain an open question whether mystical states may not possibly be superior points of view, windows through which the mind looks out upon a more extensive and inclusive world. -William James, Varieties of Religious Experience ...
Katherine Mansfield's "Bliss":
"The Rare Fiddle" as Emblem of the Political and Sexual Alienation of Woman CHANTAL CORNUT-GENTILLE D'ARCY In the final part of To the Lighthouse, Lily Briscoe, the amateur artist, is contemplating her painting and pondering on the elusive...
The Muslim East in Byron's Don Juan
The Eastern affinities which Byron developed while he was in Turkey and Greece, and which colored his Oriental Tales (Rishmawi 48-62), are still felt in his later poetry, particularly in his masterpiece. Yet it should be stated that although the East...
Wharton's the Buccaneers and Pre-Raphaelitism
Whenever a well-known writer leaves a novel unfinished, it often takes on a life of its own-witness Dickens's The Mystery of Edwin Drood or Stevenson's St. Ives and The Weir of Hermiston. Before she died Edith Wharton had written 89,000 words of The...