Papers on Language & Literature

Literary history, theory, and interpretation.

Articles from Vol. 32, No. 3, Summer

"A Stranger in a Strange Land": Biblical Typology of the Exodus in Dryden's 'The Spanish Friar'; or, 'The Double Discovery.'
Critic Susan J. Owen bemoans the fate of John Dryden's The Spanish Friar; Or, the double discovery (1680), a play she deems important though much neglected (97). Discomfited by the play's disjointed appearance, scholars continue to neglect this tragicomedy....
'Christabel,' 'King Lear,' and the Cinderella Folktale
Source studies of Coleridge's mysterious ballad Christabel have been numerous and yet tentative. In the well-researched and well-known Road to Tryermaine, Arthur Nethercot admits that he "has not found any one whole story on which .... the poem depends"...
From a Home to the World: Stephen Crane's 'George's Mother.'
Stephen Crane's career can be considered as similar to Keats's in the swift coming to maturity of the two writers. As with Keats's movement from the apprentice effort of Endymion in 1817 to the great odes of 1819, Crane developed quickly from the...
Robert Stone's Decadent Leftists
That "the best lack all conviction while the worst are filled with passionate intensity"(1) -- Yeat's conclusion early in this century -- continues to apply, although now the best are bigger wimps, and the worst are more murderous. To Robert Stone...
"Too Soon Marr'd": Juliet's Age as Symbol in 'Romeo and Juliet.'
The tender age of Juliet Capulet provides the focus of the initial conversation between Lord Capulet and Count Paris in Romeo and Juliet. She is still a child, says her father, "a straunger in the world" who "hath not seene the chaunge of fourteen...