Papers on Language & Literature

Literary history, theory, and interpretation.

Articles from Vol. 46, No. 2, Spring

A Bibliography of the Works of Frederick S. Frank
Poe, Edgar Allan. The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym. Ed. Fred Frank and Diane Long Hoeveler. Peterborough, ON: Broadview, 2010. Evans, Bertrand. The Origins of the Modern Study of Gothic Drama, Together With a Re-edition of Gothic Drama from Walpole...
A Note on One of the Earliest Gothic Ballads: Frank Sayers's "Sir Egwin"
Frederick S. Frank--Fred to all who knew and learned from him-- explored the minor manifestations of the Gothic spirit with as much relish and attention to detail as his important work on its major authors. Whether tracking down illustrations...
Coda: Remembering Fred
Those who have contributed to, and all those who will read, this special issue of PLL in honor of Fred Frank are, of course, only a tiny fraction of those whose lives, both personal and professional, were touched by Fred. An erstwhile colleague...
First Gothics: Walpole, Evans, Frank
I It is unusual to be able to date the start of a literary field of study, let alone locate the origin of a literary form. Yet, in the case of the Gothic drama, it is possible to do both. Horace Walpole, whose Castle of Otranto (1764) is said to...
Gothic Architectonics: The Poetics and Politics of Gothic Space
Its legions of copycats aside, Gothic literature has been extremely fortunate in its key architects. Whether in its condensed, initial conception in Horace Walpole's The Castle of Otranto (1764), or its more expansive form in Ann Radcliffe's The Mysteries...
Introduction
For someone so keenly interested in all things Gothic, Frederick S. Frank had an unusually ordinary upbringing. Born on December 23, l935, in Cobleskill, New York, he grew up in what he later referred to as an idyllic, small, rural community. He spent...
More Gothic Gold: The Sadleir-Black Chapbook Collection at the University of Virginia Library
"Gothic Gold: The Sadleir-Black Collection of Gothic Fiction" was one of Fred Frank's favorite articles, and he wrote to me shortly after it was published to tell me how much he had enjoyed his time surveying the collection in Charlottesville, VA....