Papers on Language & Literature

Literary history, theory, and interpretation.

Articles from Vol. 43, No. 2, Spring

"Elbowing Vacancy": Philip Larkin's Non-Places
To consider the significance of place in Philip Larkin's oeuvre may seem a foredoomed endeavor. For one whose particularity in rendering the quotidian is almost a signature trait, it is revealing that of the 172 poems Larkin wrote between 1946 and...
Epic, Ode, or Something New: The Blending of Genres in Thomson's Spring
The mid-eighteenth-century long poem is best and in greatest complexity represented by James Thomson's The Seasons and its revisions. While the idea of the long poem as a poetic genre is a twentieth-century effort of scholars to come to terms with...
Off the Raft: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Jane Smiley's the All-True Travels and Adventures of Lidie Newton
1 In the long history of Harper's magazine, the most letters ever received about an article was in response to a 1996 essay by Pulitzer prize-winning novelist Jane Smiley entitled "Say It Ain't So, Huck"(Berube 693). In this now-notorious piece,...
"The Fertilising Conflict of Individualities": H. G. Wells's A Modern Utopia, John Stuart Mill's on Liberty, and the Victorian Tradition of Liberalism
For all the humanity he wins to, through his dramatic device of dialogue, I doubt if anyone has ever been warmed to desire himself a citizen in the Republic of Plato; I doubt if anyone could stand a month of the relentless publicity of virtue...
The Locale of Melville's Gothicism
The publication of Horace Walpole's The Castle of Otranto in 1764 marks the inception of a literary mode that would be developed largely in Britain over the remainder of the eighteenth century by authors including Clara Reeve (The Old English Baron),...