Papers on Language & Literature

Literary history, theory, and interpretation.

Articles from Vol. 44, No. 4, Fall

An "Other" Destiny: Mimesis, Parody, and Assimilation
There is a deeply painful moment in Ekow Eshun's travel narrative Black Gold of the Sun when the London-born, young black protagonist goes to Ghana. It is important to note that this journey to his parents' home country is taken in a profoundly unromantic...
Challenging Conversations: Notes on the Blueprints for Progress Workshop
Contrary to the popular theory that people should not talk politics at the dinner table, people can actually benefit by talking about politics and progress much more frequently. Often times, however, engaging in dialogue about progressive ideas is...
From Here to Fredonia
Comfort We Know COMPOSED BY KYLE GEORGER Lots of woods, farm animals, corn, and the smell of manure define my home environment. Over the summer, I would wake up every morning at seven a.m., help with the cleaning of the barn, feed the animals,...
Look Left, Look Wright: Observations from the City of Light
I. Richard Wright wrote Black Boy just for me. Of that, I was certain. At least that's what I told myself as a lanky, lumbering seventh grade girl, a mess of wiry hair and thick, nearsighted lenses, ones I kept interred between the pages of a book....
Meeting Richard Wright in the Mountains: Reflections on Teaching at Northern Arizona University
Teaching African American literature can be a challenge that one is hardly prepared for and that requires much by way of patience and creativity. I was trained to teach African American literature at a large, predominantly white university in the South....
Richard Wright and Digital Movements
In November 2007, the online bookseller Amazon released the Kindle, an electronic-book (e-book) reader, and sparked publicity for this new device capable of holding the contents of hundreds of books. A few e-book reader devices had preceded the Kindle,...
The Multiple Frames for a Dynamic Diaspora in Richard Wright's Black Power
The life of Richard Wright, born in 1908 less than a half a century after the Thirteenth Amendment's ratification ended U.S. slavery, in some way stands as testament to the United States' ability to reinvent itself. In less than fifty years, the United...
Tougaloo College, Richard Wright, and Me: Teaching Wright to the Millennial Student
Tougaloo College is a small, private, historically black liberal arts college in Mississippi. Regarded as the cradle of the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement, Tougaloo College's historic Woodworth Chapel has seen prominent figures of the Movement from...
Uncle Tom's Children Revisited
Revisiting Uncle Tom's Children seventy years after its initial publication in 1938, we can profit from recalling a pithy exchange between Richard Wright and Zora Neale Hurston in the form of book reviews. Wright put himself in conversation with Hurston,...