Papers on Language & Literature

Literary history, theory, and interpretation.

Articles from Vol. 38, No. 3, Summer

A Darkness Pulled out of Us: Stanley Plumly and the Elegy of Relationship
"Language is a darkness pulled out of us." --Stanley Plumly, "Infidelity" In seven volumes over 30 years, Stanley Plumly has written numerous elegies--for friends, for poets, for his mother--that have much in common with the traditional elegy,...
Adventures in Pornographic Places: Eliza Haywood's Tea-Table and the Decentering of Moral Argument
In the opening pages of her 1743 conduct manual, A Present for a Servant-Maid, Eliza Haywood warns young female domestics against "Houses which appear well by Day, that it would be little safe for a modest Maid to sleep in at Night" (213). In these...
"It Is All a Darkness": Death, Narrative Therapy, and Ford Madox Ford's 'The Good Soldier'
Despite the publication of numerous essays that explore Ford Madox Ford's The Good Soldier (1915) in terms of its many intriguing narratological, aesthetic, comedic, and temporal aspects, the scholarship regarding Ford's most celebrated novel has...
The "Brute" Part in 'Hamlet' and 'Julius Caesar' Refigured-Regally
Was Shakespeare indebted at all to the likes of Malory if he meant by Antony's reference to "the most unkindest cut of all" (Julius Caesar 3.2.183) (1) to have had Brutus go so far as to sever his dictator's genitals vindictively for having brought...
"Then Something Snapped Inside Me": The Psychiatrist as Noir Protagonist in John Franklin Bardin's: 'The Deadly Percheron' (1946)
A common motif in one variety of American Noir crime fiction of the 1940's was the sudden violation of settled existence through some indiscriminate stab of a malign fate, or through the unprompted explosion of violent mayhem into perfectly ordinary...
The Secretive-Playful Epiphanies of Robert Frost: Solitude, Companionship, and the Ambivalent Imagination
Surprisingly, no one has yet tried to find a pattern that can unify the major epiphanies in the poems of Robert Frost; no study of the poet in the last thirty-five years even contains any variant of "epiphany" in its title (though Robert F. Fleissner...