The Journal of African American History

The Journal of African American History is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal that publishes scholarship on African American history. The Journal of African American History includes research and reviews.

Articles from Vol. 94, No. 3, Summer

A Historian in the World
Like so many of us. Professor John Hope Franklin had been a fixture in my life ever since I first discovered his magnificent From Slavery to Freedom: A History of Negro Americans in high school, and read it in earnest as a freshman at California State...
A Life of Integrity: A Tribute to Professor John Hope Franklin
Our sole defen[s]e, our only weapon, is a life of integrity, whether we meet honour or dishonour, praise or blame. II Corinthians 6:7-8a The New Testament in Modern English (J. B. Phillips) On the afternoon of 5 November 2008, a steady stream...
A Man for All Seasons in the Journey from Slavery to Freedom
Just days after the horrific assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., on 4 April 1968, I and two other African American students at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in Terre Haute, Indiana (there were only four of us out of a student body of...
Black and Blue: African Americans, the Labor Movement, and the Decline of the Democratic Party
Paul Frymer, Black and Blue: African Americans, the Labor Movement, and the Decline of the Democratic Party. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2008. Pp. 202. Cloth $55.00. Paper $24.95. Paul Frymer's Black and Blue is primarily concerned...
From Slavery to Freedom, Third Edition: Snapshot from the Life of a Book
John Hope Franklin for me will forever be associated with the third edition of From Slavery to Freedom (1967), which I bought in August 1971 in New York City for all of $2.00 (list price was $3.45). (1) I was about to start my first full-time job in...
Humanity, Scholarship, and Proud Race Citizenship: The Gifts of John Hope Franklin
John Hope Franklin died seven weeks after my mother, Dona Lolita Irvin, of the same cause: congestive heart disease. World renowned and universally mourned, he was two years older than my mother, she, a celebrity in her own right on a closely circumscribed,...
Interview with Dr. John Hope Franklin
INTRODUCTION In 2007 we celebrated the 60th anniversary of the first edition of From Slavery to Freedom (FSTF), John Hope Franklin's groundbreaking synthesis that introduced African Americans' narrative history to millions of people throughout the...
Introduction: Exploring the Legacy of Dr. John Hope Franklin
"Hello, it's nice to meet you young man. Have a seat, and make yourself comfortable." I had arrived on time for my first meeting with Professor John Hope Franklin whom I had been hoping to study with for years. I had waited for some time to get an...
John Hope Franklin and Black History in Transition
During our very first conversation, which took place in 1974 at the Southern Historical Association meeting, John Hope Franklin and I discovered that we shared a mutual appreciation of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). John Hope...
John Hope Franklin: Mentor and Confidante
On the evening of 25 March 2009, I was sitting quietly in my office at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, oblivious to the world, pondering an upcoming presentation on African American women, suffrage, and partisan politics in the...
Participant-Observer of History: John Hope Franklin-Scholar, Mentor, and Promoter of African American Women's History
When Dr. John Hope Franklin died on 25 March 2009, the historical profession lost a true pioneer, a "historian's historian," and one of the most important scholars of the 20th century. For over 70 years, John Hope Franklin contributed major works to...
"Standing on the Shoulders of a Giant": Personal Reflections on a Great American
Unlike many others, I did not know Dr. John Hope Franklin as his student or as a university colleague. I did not use any of his books in my undergraduate work, since U.S. history was not my major field of study. At the doctoral level in the early 1970s,...
"We Can Best Honor the Past ... by Facing It Squarely, Honestly, and above All, Openly"
Over the years, I had many gratifying conversations with Dr. John Hope Franklin. Two of those conversations, however, stand out, in large part because they left me perplexed. In 1994, I had the honor of presenting Dr. Franklin with the Carter G. Woodson...