The Journal of African American History

The Journal of African American History is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal that publishes scholarship on African American history. The Journal of African American History includes research and reviews.

Articles from Vol. 88, No. 4, Fall

"A Shadow of the Real Thing": Furrow Societies, Water User Associations, and Democratic Practices in the Kilimanjaro Region of Tanzania
In his essay on democracy and development in Africa, Gavin Williams in this Special Issue of The Journal of African American History argues that both the socialist and the liberal economic policies of African states over the past thirty years have...
Books Received*
Aarim-Heriot, Najia. Chinese Immigrants, African Americans, and Racial Anxiety in the United States, 1848-82. Urbana: University of Illinois Press. 2003. Pp. 289. Cloth $39.95. Allen Jr., Norman R., editor. The Black Humanist Experience: An Alternative...
Carter G. Woodson Distinguished Lecturers 2003-2004
The Association for the Study of African American Life and History and The Journal of African American History are pleased to present the list of the Carter G. Woodson Distinguished Lecturers for 2003-2004. These lecturers are among the leading scholars...
Commentary: U.S. African Americans, Africans, and Globalization
In 1974 I met with hundreds in South Africa and I realized that apartheid was sinful. When I was getting on the plane to go home, the police took me to a room, and told me to remove my clothes. A man with the biggest .45 I've ever seen...
Democracy as Idea and Democracy as Process in Africa
Democracy is an idea. It is deployed as an analytic concept, a normative ideal, a political prescription, and an empirical description. Its meanings slide among these usages. The idea of democracy is real in its far-reaching consequences. Democracy...
Development Hegemony and the Development Crisis in Africa: The Importance of Indigenous Knowledges and Practices in the Making of Food Policy
The dominant theme in development discourse and practice in the last two decades is that African and other "Third World" countries facing severe economic crisis are reaping the fruits of import substitution policies, which they initiated and pursued...
Examinations Standards, Educational Assessments, and Globalizing Elites: The Case of the West African Examinations Council
The term "globalization" has come to define the current geo-political order. A worldwide phenomenon, James Mittelman identifies globalization as a coalescence of varied transnational processes and domestic structures, allowing the economy,...
Introduction: Globalization, Neoliberalism, and Historical Conditionalities
During this period of history, African states as conceptual entities, physical realities, and governing units are being challenged by global interests, neoliberal economic policies, and profound internal social and physical upheavals. The present fifty-three...
National Liberation, Neoliberalism, and Educational Change: The Case of Post-Apartheid South Africa
It is extremely informative to read recent World Bank reports concerning higher education in the so-called developing countries. (1) Although the prescriptions were firmly committed to promoting core neoliberal values, such as the curtailing of government...
The Evolution of Health and Welfare Policies in South Africa: Inherited Institutions, Fiscal Restraint, and the Deracialization of Social Policy in the Post-Apartheid Era
Institutions which have died as creeds sometimes continue, nevertheless, to survive as habits. --Richard H. Tawney, 1931 (1) The central question in this essay is: Why is the social policy reform program of the post-apartheid African National...